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Posted: 3/14/2006 3:39:59 PM EDT
I was wondering the steps I need to take in making my trigger break nice and crisp.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 5:11:42 PM EDT
can you not put a set screw in the Grip screw hole kinda like they way superior arms does there Lower
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 10:46:40 PM EDT
Shoot the gun a lot. It'll break itself in after a thousand or two rounds. You can also use a lower power trigger return spring to lighten it up a bit.
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 10:53:18 PM EDT
You will smooth out a trigger by shooting the crap out of it, and you will lighten the pull a tad by going to a weaker spring (or by cutting a leg off of it), but you'll never make the break any crisper. That's determined by the engagement surfaces and angle of the sear.

If you file it to change it, you'll take off the surface hardening of the trigger and sear, and end up with a trigger that degrades. It can be done, but it doesn't usually last.

The only GOOD way to get a nice clean, crisp break is to put in an aftermarket trigger. I like the RRA 2-stage myself, as it's reliable and easy....and a vast improvement over the stock job.
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 11:22:40 PM EDT
I would not file on it too much, like Swingset said, it will degrade if you take too much of the surface off. I have had decent luck polishing with a fine stone. Look up "15 minute trigger job" for one of the common ways to work one over.

Link Posted: 3/16/2006 2:43:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mrassII:
can you not put a set screw in the Grip screw hole kinda like they way superior arms does there Lower


Yes you can. you also have to re cut the rear of the trigger for the safety and rework your disconnect. I had some extra parts so I did it just to see if it could be done but I don't recommend doing this.
Get yourself a good after market trigger if you feel stock is not good enough.
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 4:23:23 AM EDT
Dry fire practice, you should be doing this already.
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 8:59:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/16/2006 9:02:15 AM EDT by halfmoonclip]

Originally Posted By caneau:
Shoot the gun a lot. It'll break itself in after a thousand or two rounds. You can also use a lower power trigger return spring to lighten it up a bit.


Yep. Or dry snap it, as noted.
You can speed up the process with the '15 min trigger job', or just polish the sear surfaces with a buffing wheel on a Dremel. I found an old tube of teflon based lube that helped a lot as well.
I tried a 'target' trigger that was actually worse than OEM. Arghhhh.
Moon
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 3:16:59 PM EDT
???? I used to compete in TRAP and SKEET shooting, and i learned 1 thing,, dont service your own triger , period

I use an RRA 2 stage triger and dont know if a better triger is made,, out of the box it fires crisp and clean.....if you F up your triger you will have to buy another,,,so save the one you have for another PARTS FRANKEN rifle and just buy a good triger for your good gun........................................
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 3:25:33 PM EDT
I've seen people experiment with polishing compounds applied during normal use. I've seen people make their weapons unsafe by preloading the trigger. It doesn't effect the break, just the length of pull.

Stock AR triggers have a positive angle on them. Make it a neutral or negative angle to lighten the pull and it becomes a safety issue. Notice how the hammer moves down a bit when you begin the stroke of the trigger?

Spend $75.00 for a cheap (Brownells) RRA 2 stage match trigger. Its worth it to be safe and have a 5 pound pull. That's what mine was when I put it in a couple'a months back. I haven't shot a lot since then but I'm sure it'll break in right.

The AR / M16 is a combat rifle, designed for reliability, not precision shooting. If you're trigger pull is screwing you up that bad, it's probably something you need to fix in YOU, not in the gun.

No offense intended, just being observant.
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 3:50:26 PM EDT
Apparently most triggers are carburized [thin hard skin,soft core=tough], most heat treat facilities offer a .030" or .060" case. So even if a .010" case is what the trigger people are asking for,it would take a dam lot of stoning to get close to comprimising the case, you just want to remove tooling marks. Triggers and files should not be used in the same sentence. You should be using a 600 grit stone or finer and maintain the original angles. It's not rocket science. Mike
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 1:13:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By velvetant:

Originally Posted By mrassII:
can you not put a set screw in the Grip screw hole kinda like they way superior arms does there Lower


Yes you can. you also have to re cut the rear of the trigger for the safety and rework your disconnect. I had some extra parts so I did it just to see if it could be done but I don't recommend doing this.
Get yourself a good after market trigger if you feel stock is not good enough.


This is everything I did.
www.referenceonly.com/Affordable_Trigger.pdf
www.ar15.com/lite/topic.html?b=3&f=12&t=268257
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