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Posted: 2/15/2006 5:03:53 PM EDT
I cant imagine that is very practical to wear hearing protection during combat. I would probably want hear what was going on around me. On the flip side I can only speculate as to what it must sound like to be in combat. I guess what trying to say is, the few times I've pulled the trigger on one of my ARs without hearing protection I regreted it for a few days. How do you deal with it?
Thanks for the insight.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 5:17:04 PM EDT
I've seen some operators wear the Peltor hearing protectors that use small microphones mounted on them that amplify the sound until it reaches 85 and above decibels, then they "cut-off" the sound to keep from damaging hearing. They also make ear plugs that work this way and I think that the troops that have helmets issued to them favor the plugs because they work better with the helmets. I bought a pair of the plugs for about $30.00 at Wal-Mart, they work pretty well and I was just trying them out to see if I liked them. I'll probably buy a better set of them someday, I really liked them. ARKAR
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 5:37:47 PM EDT
We always wore muffs on the range and plugs in the field. One of the oddities of combat (at least for me) is that the gunfire and explosions seem to be muted. Your blood rushes and it seems like your heart is pounding in your ears. I never had any problems with hearing when shots were fired. I currently own a set of Peltor Comtacs and only wish I had them back then.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 5:52:54 PM EDT
I never use hearing protection when I shoot my AR, I only use hearing protection when I’m shooting a high-powered rifles, doesn’t seem to bother me with my AR.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 5:56:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hylton:
I never use hearing protection when I shoot my AR, I only use hearing protection when I’m shooting a high-powered rifles, doesn’t seem to bother me with my AR.



WHAT?!


Had too...
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:01:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thanegrooms:

Originally Posted By Hylton:
I never use hearing protection when I shoot my AR, I only use hearing protection when I’m shooting a high-powered rifles, doesn’t seem to bother me with my AR.



WHAT?!


Had too...



I don't wear hearing protection when I'm hunting (yes, I do hunt some things with an AR) but the few times I've fired the AR, I had serious hearing problems for an hour, and occasional ringing for the next few days. This is not something I can imagine doing on a regular basis. It wouldn't take very long to ruin your ears.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:05:18 PM EDT
I'm only 26 and have lost a significant amount of my hearing. It happens over time and you won't notice it at first. It's nearly impossible for me to understand someone when in a noisy enviroment unless I can see their lips moving to see what they are saying. Its hard to hear people on the phone etc.. It sounds like I have cotton in my ears. On top of the fact I have to have something like a fish tank or fan running at night when I sleep to drowned out the ringing in my ears when it is quiet. Pure hell. Wear ear protection! I double up now, and wish I would have before. It doesn't take long to permanently damage your ears.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:16:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hylton:
I never use hearing protection when I shoot my AR, I only use hearing protection when I’m shooting a high-powered rifles, doesn’t seem to bother me with my AR.



Good luck with your hearing.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:23:02 PM EDT
I've been wearing Pelitor Electronic Muffs for the last couple rotations. They've been issued to us and work wonders. You can hear radio traffic inside the HUMVEE (ie loud noise) and also hear your comrades. Gun shots and IEDs your ears are protected. I've had 40% hearing loss in my left ear since I was 23 and have a hearing ear aid for it.

CD
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:28:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ARKAR:
I've seen some operators wear the Peltor hearing protectors that use small microphones mounted on them that amplify the sound until it reaches 85 and above decibels, then they "cut-off" the sound to keep from damaging hearing. They also make ear plugs that work this way and I think that the troops that have helmets issued to them favor the plugs because they work better with the helmets. I bought a pair of the plugs for about $30.00 at Wal-Mart, they work pretty well and I was just trying them out to see if I liked them. I'll probably buy a better set of them someday, I really liked them. ARKAR



Were those the green plugs by SSI (red clamshell package)? Just curious as I was thinking of picking them up myself, if these are the ones.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:32:53 PM EDT
Wear them while shooting and at rock concerts, trust me, it pays off. You only have one set of ears.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 6:33:12 PM EDT
I use the Duo plugs



Green end is like any other plug, but Yellow end has a little tube in it that allows you to hear people and whatnot around you while blocking the gun blast

they are like $10-15
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 9:30:11 PM EDT
Sordins are part of the MICH communication system. Radio reception, enhanced ambient sound, and hearing protection all in one. Fits under the helmet.

I am waiting for the Bluetooth wireless version to be released. MSA buyout delyed the introduction.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 9:39:01 PM EDT
I don't wear hearing protection when dismounted, but when I'm on the move in a HMMWV you better believe I wear it. First, the constant HMMWV noise has a detrimental effect I bet, and since you can't hear anything over it anyway you're not missing much by wearing ear pro. Second, after the first two IEDs that I was hit by in my truck, I had horrific tinnitus for a week, and I'm sure some permanent hearing loss (we'll see when I take my redeployment hearing exam). There is no way to describe how loud an IED is when it hits your truck. It is mindblowing. The sound itself is completely disorienting.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 9:40:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bushHK:
I cant imagine that is very practical to wear hearing protection during combat. I would probably want hear what was going on around me. On the flip side I can only speculate as to what it must sound like to be in combat. I guess what trying to say is, the few times I've pulled the trigger on one of my ARs without hearing protection I regreted it for a few days. How do you deal with it?
Thanks for the insight.



Well considering my friend James who fought in Iraq for two years with the 1st Marine, is now almost 40% deaf I would say that hearing protection is necessary. The poor bastard talks so loud all the time now you think he's drunk everyday, not to mention he watches the tv so loud the neighbors complained, and unless he's looking right at you or you yell then he may not hear you.

Link Posted: 2/15/2006 9:55:07 PM EDT
Having had the opportunity to meet a man that was hit by an IED and lost his hearing in both ears, I would say that it is important. Not just because he can't ear, but because you can't even walk straight without ear drums.

As far as protection from gunfire, in my hunting experience, the chemicals that rush through your body will protect you from most of a gunshot. That doesn't mean that you will be able to hear after a fight, or even during.

Several militaries around the world have adopted suppressors on all weapons, and thet would be a good idea for us as well. Some units already have. If you are in an environment where IEDs are common, active earpro is a good idea. Earplugs would probably work better when it is very hot, too.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 10:18:16 PM EDT
WHAT
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 10:50:52 PM EDT
I can't imagine routinely firing a gun without hearing protection, that is insane.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 11:10:19 PM EDT
most everyone is wearing earpro of some type. leaders have peltors hooked into MBITR radios. Some of us bought our own peltors and they work great; fit under the helmet just fine. Others use earplugs; you can actually hear better with earpro in than if you're recovering from loud noise.

i am a big believer in earpro. get the best you can for your application and use it as much as you can
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 12:45:45 AM EDT


In other words, even if the firearm in question isn't a "High Power", i.e.; .22 Rimfire, everybody here will wear hearing protection when they shoot.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 1:27:04 AM EDT
I don't shoot nor did I go outside the gate without wearing my Walker Game Ears.

I had a buddy fire an M14 years ago with my head even with the muzzle. That was the last time I get around a gun without hearing protection.

Anyone who tells you they are not doing damage otherwise is fooling not only themselves but others as well.

There is no substitute. I lost a job possibility with US Customs due to my hearing loss from this.

You have to look at what it is worth to you, especially down the road.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 1:52:36 AM EDT
The Duo-Plugs are our Brigade SOP. I didn't wear plugs walking around last tour, but that was all dismounted work with shots fired few and far between. This time it's all enclosed Hummvees and IED's.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 2:24:48 AM EDT
I wear ear plugs all day, 5 days a week. So I'm pretty comfortable with them. I can hear pretty well with them on, I guess maybe it sharpened my sences.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 2:30:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Beckes:

Originally Posted By ARKAR:
I've seen some operators wear the Peltor hearing protectors that use small microphones mounted on them that amplify the sound until it reaches 85 and above decibels, then they "cut-off" the sound to keep from damaging hearing. They also make ear plugs that work this way and I think that the troops that have helmets issued to them favor the plugs because they work better with the helmets. I bought a pair of the plugs for about $30.00 at Wal-Mart, they work pretty well and I was just trying them out to see if I liked them. I'll probably buy a better set of them someday, I really liked them. ARKAR



Were those the green plugs by SSI (red clamshell package)? Just curious as I was thinking of picking them up myself, if these are the ones.



That's the ones, they have adjustable volume, three different size plugs to fit to your ears and have worked pretty well so far. Pick up a pair and try them, I think you'll like them. ARKAR
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 2:45:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2006 2:49:10 AM EDT by armaliteuser]
Thanks for all the responses from our Military personel.

I treat Veterans of all ages with the few left from WWII, with hearing difficulties.
IEDs usually = blown ear drums that heal with scarring not allowing drum to quiver as much (air conduction loss)
Howitzer crews with bone conduction loss (nerve conduction loss). Ever wonder why you can still hear yourself with plugged ears?

Even with ear protection for air conduction the bone conduction system over time can be affected.

Recreational, outdoor shooters can get away longer with ear protection.
Indoor shooters, even with air conduction protection) cannot really protect from bone conduction damage but it takes longer to damage.

More exposure=faster hearing loss

Experiencing balance problems= inner ear damage, not drum damage

Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:22:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ARKAR:

Originally Posted By Beckes:

Originally Posted By ARKAR:
I've seen some operators wear the Peltor hearing protectors that use small microphones mounted on them that amplify the sound until it reaches 85 and above decibels, then they "cut-off" the sound to keep from damaging hearing. They also make ear plugs that work this way and I think that the troops that have helmets issued to them favor the plugs because they work better with the helmets. I bought a pair of the plugs for about $30.00 at Wal-Mart, they work pretty well and I was just trying them out to see if I liked them. I'll probably buy a better set of them someday, I really liked them. ARKAR



Were those the green plugs by SSI (red clamshell package)? Just curious as I was thinking of picking them up myself, if these are the ones.



That's the ones, they have adjustable volume, three different size plugs to fit to your ears and have worked pretty well so far. Pick up a pair and try them, I think you'll like them. ARKAR



My roommate bought some yesterday when we went to Wally-World. I almost did, but he makes better money than I, so I figured I'd let him try them.


Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:35:11 AM EDT
Back in my Class III days I fired a 20 round mag out of an M-16 and forgot to wear hearing protection. I realized it after the first burst but, being young and stupid (is there any other combination?), I kept on going. My ears rang for a week. How it is tolerated in combat I do not know--lot's of service-connected injuries for hearing loss I am sure. I'm glad to hear our soldiers are protecting themselves with the latest equipment.

After three decades of rock concerts, car stereos and gun ranges (where I always wore hearing protection w/ the exception of the above) I have significant hearing loss. I'm working up my nerve to get a hearing aid.

Eyes and ears cannot be replaced--protect them!
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:43:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FeedMyBeltFed:
I'm only 26 and have lost a significant amount of my hearing. It happens over time and you won't notice it at first. It's nearly impossible for me to understand someone when in a noisy enviroment unless I can see their lips moving to see what they are saying. Its hard to hear people on the phone etc.. It sounds like I have cotton in my ears. On top of the fact I have to have something like a fish tank or fan running at night when I sleep to drowned out the ringing in my ears when it is quiet. Pure hell. Wear ear protection! I double up now, and wish I would have before. It doesn't take long to permanently damage your ears.



Very good post. You and I are in the same boat. I am 37 now, but my tinnitus has been going on since I was about 21. All those times I shot without any protection when I was young finally caught up with me. I started wearing plugs when I began shooting a rifle, but I didn't when I hunted and I am paying for it. Now I carry plugs when I hunt and on the range I use plugs and muffs.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 6:37:24 AM EDT

I use the Duo plugs

Green end is like any other plug, but Yellow end has a little tube in it that allows you to hear people and whatnot around you while blocking the gun blast

they are like $10-15



I used these in Iraq. Outstanding. Green end out is for loud sharp noises (gun fire, IEDs), the yellow side out is for steady state noises (helicopters, Hummvees).
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 6:40:54 AM EDT




Insert YELLOW plugs for weapons fire in dismounted mode.
Insert OLIVE DRAB plugs for steady state noise in and around aircraft, noisy vehicles and watercraft. etc.

Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:51:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FeedMyBeltFed:
I'm only 26 and have lost a significant amount of my hearing. It happens over time and you won't notice it at first. It's nearly impossible for me to understand someone when in a noisy enviroment unless I can see their lips moving to see what they are saying. Its hard to hear people on the phone etc.. It sounds like I have cotton in my ears. On top of the fact I have to have something like a fish tank or fan running at night when I sleep to drowned out the ringing in my ears when it is quiet. Pure hell. Wear ear protection! I double up now, and wish I would have before. It doesn't take long to permanently damage your ears.


thats tinitus, I have that problem also but I have learned to deal with it. I never listened to loud music or did anything to damage my hearing and yet I have it.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:05:22 AM EDT
I have 70% hearing loss in my right ear and 45% left ear. It is all because when I was young I didn't think I needed to wear hearing protection when shooting. I had a guy fire a 12 gauge shotty over my right shoulder once. I fired hundreds of rounds of .44 mag and other bigbore handguns with no hearing protection. Throw in some cranked up heavy metal for good measure and you have me almost legally deaf at 37 years old. Good for all you guys that wear hearing protection religiously. I really wish I had. I do now, just to protect what I have left. I am currently using a set of Bilson T3s. They may be a little bit of overkill but at this point what little I have left is very precious.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:05:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2006 8:07:08 AM EDT by SelectFire]

Originally Posted By Hylton:
I never use hearing protection when I shoot my AR, I only use hearing protection when I’m shooting a high-powered rifles, doesn’t seem to bother me with my AR.



I've been an aircraft mechanic for 30 years this April and like people have said you won't ever notice the gradual hearing loss until it's really too late.A jet engine is rated around 120db but gunfire can go up around 140 or higher.
By the time you notice problems many of the tiny hair like deals in your ears that enable you to hear have been damaged and that's it.
Game over.
Wear something everytime you shoot or you'll regret it later.


Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:14:48 AM EDT
ALWAYS WEAR YOUR EARPRO!!! If you are deploying to a combat zone, skip the DVD player or IPOD and get some electronic hearing amplifiers/protection. You can get over the boredom, not the hearing loss, and don't fool yourself thinking that the adrenaline flowing through your body prevents hearing loss, it doesn't, it just seems muffled at the time. I work construction and my team leader is deaf as a rock, he runs all sorts of shit all day with no earpro, plus he served on a cruiser in Vietnam, he wore no earpro when he was on deck and they were firing the 8'' guns. I'm sure THAT didn't help any. Now I always carry some disposable earpro with me everywhere I go, you never know when you are going to need it and it doesn't pay to be without it even once. Don't have any earpro with you? I once chewed up some paper and stuck it in there at a concert, your friends might laugh at you, but you'll have the last laugh when their 45 and can't function without a hearing aid.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:22:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Hylton:
I never use hearing protection when I shoot my AR, I only use hearing protection when I’m shooting a high-powered rifles, doesn’t seem to bother me with my AR.



This is either complete B.S. or incredibly stupid.

Seydou
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:46:22 AM EDT
I learned to wear hearing protection the hard way. I fired 3 rounds of a .480 Ruger without any, which was an extremely stupid mistake, and now I have permanent hearing damage. I am 17 and I already have tinnitus...
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:55:22 AM EDT
There is one reference in the book "Blackhawk Down" of a Delta Force operator who was wearing ar plugs. He popped it to listen to a noise he heard in the back of a house he was hiding in.

There are these ear plugs that have a mechanical valve (hoc valve?) which blocks high decible sounds (see the red ones in the picture bellow). It is non-electronic and effective for outdoor use. I have used them, but they are in no way as effective as properly inserted foamies in blocking damaging sound levels. But that's the trade off.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 9:28:55 AM EDT
I wear double protectin at the range. If I can get them, I wear the new combat earplugs on patrols and convoys. The Etymotics ER-20 is cheap and works similarly to the combat plugs, you will take damage with the ER-20 though. The Peltor Tactical 6 fits under the new Army Combat Helmet, I need to get a set.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:40:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2006 5:42:40 PM EDT by Capt_Wizzbang]

thats tinitus, I have that problem also but I have learned to deal with it. I never listened to loud music or did anything to damage my hearing and yet I have it.


You can get tinnitus other ways as well, I'm not sure what they all are. Getting punched in the ear or even in the side of your head hard enough will do the job sometimes. With trauma like that the hearing loss is hit and miss, but I can guarantee you that if you take a hard enough whack on the head your hearing will get damaged, I've seen it a million times.

People exposed to carbon monoxide for example might have ringing in the ears...I notice I get loud ringing in my ears after I've had a lot to drink. Who knows what did it for you but loud noise is only one road.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:45:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DevL:
Sordins are part of the MICH communication system. Radio reception, enhanced ambient sound, and hearing protection all in one. Fits under the helmet.

I am waiting for the Bluetooth wireless version to be released. MSA buyout delyed the introduction.



Sordin is the way to go.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:57:30 PM EDT
In Iraq, whenever I was in the Bradley I wore these, on the ground I wore nothing because my hearing is already so bad I couldnt hear anyone say a damn thing with them in. As for gunfire, on the range I always wear them, in real life, I never notice the noise, and I still get 5's and 10's on my hearing test, go figure


Originally Posted By KnobCreek:
us.st11.yimg.com/store1.yimg.com/I/botach_1885_237884929



Insert YELLOW plugs for weapons fire in dismounted mode.
Insert OLIVE DRAB plugs for steady state noise in and around aircraft, noisy vehicles and watercraft. etc.


Link Posted: 2/17/2006 10:16:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dragonfly228:
There is one reference in the book "Blackhawk Down" of a Delta Force operator who was wearing ar plugs. He popped it to listen to a noise he heard in the back of a house he was hiding in.

There are these ear plugs that have a mechanical valve (hoc valve?) which blocks high decible sounds (see the red ones in the picture bellow). It is non-electronic and effective for outdoor use. I have used them, but they are in no way as effective as properly inserted foamies in blocking damaging sound levels. But that's the trade off.
www.customearprotection.com/products/images/sonicvalves.jpg



Who makes these plugs?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 11:54:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2006 11:55:36 PM EDT by Spade]

Originally Posted By fogofwar:
Back in my Class III days I fired a 20 round mag out of an M-16 and forgot to wear hearing protection. I realized it after the first burst but, being young and stupid (is there any other combination?), I kept on going. My ears rang for a week.




5 rounds, an AR-180B, a muzzle brake, and an earthen berm.

I brought my M4 back to PA to shoot this weekend. Forgot my "ears" in VA. No range time for me.


Thanks for the links to the plugs guys. More than once I've been that guy aiming while everybody else stands around waiting to check targets because I never heard the cease fire through my muffs. Always hate that.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 12:08:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FeedMyBeltFed:
I'm only 26 and have lost a significant amount of my hearing. It happens over time and you won't notice it at first. It's nearly impossible for me to understand someone when in a noisy enviroment unless I can see their lips moving to see what they are saying. Its hard to hear people on the phone etc.. It sounds like I have cotton in my ears. On top of the fact I have to have something like a fish tank or fan running at night when I sleep to drowned out the ringing in my ears when it is quiet. Pure hell. Wear ear protection! I double up now, and wish I would have before. It doesn't take long to permanently damage your ears.



im the same age and in the same boat, went deaf mostly from car stereo's and the guns just made it worse.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:25:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SelectFire:

Originally Posted By Hylton:
I never use hearing protection when I shoot my AR, I only use hearing protection when I’m shooting a high-powered rifles, doesn’t seem to bother me with my AR.



I've been an aircraft mechanic for 30 years this April and like people have said you won't ever notice the gradual hearing loss until it's really too late.A jet engine is rated around 120db but gunfire can go up around 140 or higher.
By the time you notice problems many of the tiny hair like deals in your ears that enable you to hear have been damaged and that's it.
Game over.
Wear something everytime you shoot or you'll regret it later.






I spent eight years in the USAF as an aircraft mechanic and have noticable (not significant) hearing loss. We never doubled up and now I'm paying the price. Thank God there is no permant ringing or such but it still sucks to have to have people repeat themselves just because they are soft spoken.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 2:43:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KnobCreek:
us.st11.yimg.com/store1.yimg.com/I/botach_1885_237884929



Insert YELLOW plugs for weapons fire in dismounted mode.
Insert OLIVE DRAB plugs for steady state noise in and around aircraft, noisy vehicles and watercraft. etc.




Can these be bought anywhere, or do I just have to hope I get them issued eventually?
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 9:11:31 PM EDT
I've had firearms related hearing loss since I was in 9th grade back in '79 (first diagnosed). Nobody I shot with back then (countryboy) had ever even HEARD of hearing protection, let alone used it. I remember being issued ear plugs during Marine Corps bootcamp, and wondering what all the fuss was about. I eventually enrolled in the PLC officers selection program when I was in college, but was told I didn't qualify for flight training due to this hearing loss, and so I pretty much lost all my interest in that career path and opted to just finish out my reserve commitment.
I've had a constant, high-pitched ringing in my ears all this time. Right at the same frequencies as crickets, through mosquitos. I kind of miss hearing the crickets...
The only time it bothers me during normal day to day activity is with soft spoken females...like my wife. Of course some might call that a blessing. It gets old having to ask people to repeat themselves.
I religiously use hearing protection now, but, naturally, it's way too late.
My father was with the 11th Marines during WW2, and brought home some serious hearing loss, and it surprises me he didn't do more to educate and protect us kids while teaching us to shoot. Maybe he thought rifles were ok, and only howitzers produced damage...unknown.
All I know is, when ever I take my little monsters out shooting I double up their hearing protection with foam plugs and earmuffs.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 10:01:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LthrnckZero:

Originally Posted By KnobCreek:
us.st11.yimg.com/store1.yimg.com/I/botach_1885_237884929



Insert YELLOW plugs for weapons fire in dismounted mode.
Insert OLIVE DRAB plugs for steady state noise in and around aircraft, noisy vehicles and watercraft. etc.




Can these be bought anywhere, or do I just have to hope I get them issued eventually?



If you deploy I guarantee you'll get them.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 11:04:14 AM EDT
Said it before and I will say it again: some of you firing your AR's and any other firearm who do not feel your hearing is affected better read some of these post carefully. I see firearm related hearing impairment routinely every day in my practice and there are numerous well done studies of veterans demonstrating significant loss directed related to degree of exposure. You will know when you can't hear someones voice on the phone or when you cannot hear someone speaking in a group or when your kids/spouse yell at you for having the tv at 87 decibels. Please don't subsidize my gun addiction with your bad choices. My 2 cents.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 11:23:29 AM EDT

Concern for my hearing is what is driving me to get suppressors for my AR's.

After those are paid for I'll be looking into Suppressors for my M1A and PTR91.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 11:25:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Hylton:
I never use hearing protection when I shoot my AR, I only use hearing protection when I’m shooting a high-powered rifles, doesn’t seem to bother me with my AR.



If you can shoot a 14 1/2 in M4 with mil spec ammo and have it not bother you I think your hearing is 3/4 gone already.
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