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Posted: 2/3/2006 10:19:03 AM EDT
I shot my Ar15 last weekend with a bipod. It was my first time with either. I noticed I was tending to string shots vertically.
I used a concrete bench with the bipod legs on a carpet sample we keep at the range. I was using a scope.
I noticed that when I shot the rifle jumped and meved off the target quite a bit.
I used one arm with my left folded across my body under the pistol grip while sitting.
Am I doing this wrong? I have shot rifles and pistols for 40 years, but either offhand, prone or sandbagged. I don't remember any rifle jumping so far.
Is it possible I didn't have it pulled in tight enough to my shoulder, or is this common when using a bipod?
Thanks,
Jim
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 1:33:47 PM EDT
the muzzle of my rifle jumps as well when i shoot off a bipod but i have no problems with stringing.

tuck the rifle closer and try holding down the front if its freefloated.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 1:35:48 PM EDT
Is it free floated?
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 1:38:29 PM EDT
"Load" the bipod. Assuming it is free floated.

To Load the bipod get down in your position and have the rifle on the bipod legs. Now scouch forward about an inch and lean into the bipod. If that doesn't work try harder.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 2:07:49 PM EDT
It isn't free floated- yet.
I have the Harris bipod mounted via an adapter to the stock round handguard.
I am not absolutely it is stringing. I have a lot of variables to sort through.
I was using the Winchester white box bulk ammo, and my 20" Colt HBAR still has the stock trigger that is heavy as hell. The bipod is new, and it is my first. It is a Harris bencrest model.
Couple all that with the fact that this is my first AR15 and I have a lot to try to see what's the problem. There may, in fact, be no problem and I just need to get used to the rifle.

On other rifles I have had stringing is usually always a bedding problem, but I wondered if the bipod may be putting pressure on the barrel via the lower handguard.

Thanks,
Jim
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 10:10:52 PM EDT
bipods and slings will deflect a non free floated barrel. vertical stringing can also be caused by inconsistencies in ammo or barrel heating.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 10:37:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2006 10:39:20 PM EDT by TylerM_8]

Originally Posted By pepperbelly:
It isn't free floated- yet.
I have the Harris bipod mounted via an adapter to the stock round handguard.
I am not absolutely it is stringing. I have a lot of variables to sort through.
I was using the Winchester white box bulk ammo, and my 20" Colt HBAR still has the stock trigger that is heavy as hell. The bipod is new, and it is my first. It is a Harris bencrest model.
Couple all that with the fact that this is my first AR15 and I have a lot to try to see what's the problem. There may, in fact, be no problem and I just need to get used to the rifle.

On other rifles I have had stringing is usually always a bedding problem, but I wondered if the bipod may be putting pressure on the barrel via the lower handguard.

Thanks,
Jim



Could that be his problem? If I recall correctly, when I shot Winchester white box it was scattered quite a bit. I thougt I read on here that they have over-pressure problems.
Link Posted: 2/4/2006 7:39:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By pepperbelly:
It isn't free floated- yet.
I have the Harris bipod mounted via an adapter to the stock round handguard.
I am not absolutely it is stringing. I have a lot of variables to sort through.
I was using the Winchester white box bulk ammo, and my 20" Colt HBAR still has the stock trigger that is heavy as hell. The bipod is new, and it is my first. It is a Harris bencrest model.
Couple all that with the fact that this is my first AR15 and I have a lot to try to see what's the problem. There may, in fact, be no problem and I just need to get used to the rifle.

On other rifles I have had stringing is usually always a bedding problem, but I wondered if the bipod may be putting pressure on the barrel via the lower handguard.

Thanks,
Jim



Could that be his problem? If I recall correctly, when I shot Winchester white box it was scattered quite a bit. I thougt I read on here that they have over-pressure problems.



That's the easiest fix. I'll try some different ammo and see what happens.
Jim
Link Posted: 2/4/2006 8:32:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pepperbelly:
I noticed I was tending to string shots vertically.

I used a concrete bench with the bipod legs on a carpet sample we keep at the range. I was using a scope.

I noticed that when I shot the rifle jumped and meved off the target quite a bit.

I used one arm with my left folded across my body under the pistol grip while sitting.

Is it possible I didn't have it pulled in tight enough to my shoulder, or is this common when using a bipod?

Thanks,
Jim




Try folding your left arm while putting your left hand on the swivel of your buttstock. Your left hand should "push" the stock toward your right shoulder ... holding it steady.

While ARs do have some felt recoil, IMO, it should not be jumping that erratically as you described it. It may just be a problem with technique rather than equipment. Good luck.
Link Posted: 2/4/2006 8:57:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By eye_spy:

Originally Posted By pepperbelly:
I noticed I was tending to string shots vertically.

I used a concrete bench with the bipod legs on a carpet sample we keep at the range. I was using a scope.

I noticed that when I shot the rifle jumped and meved off the target quite a bit.

I used one arm with my left folded across my body under the pistol grip while sitting.

Is it possible I didn't have it pulled in tight enough to my shoulder, or is this common when using a bipod?

Thanks,
Jim




Try folding your left arm while putting your left hand on the swivel of your buttstock. Your left hand should "push" the stock toward your right shoulder ... holding it steady.

While ARs do have some felt recoil, IMO, it should not be jumping that erratically as you described it. It may just be a problem with technique rather than equipment. Good luck.



Technique probably did play a part. I folded my left arm under the buttstock but didn't know what to do with it so I kept it on the bench.
I expected some movement, but I actually had to find the target again through the scope after every shot. It moved to the left completely off the target board.

Jim
Link Posted: 2/4/2006 9:31:31 AM EDT
Have you tried holding the rifle down with a Sling. Put the Sling through the hole in the bi-pod and loop it around your left Bicep. Pull tight while taking your left hand and make a fist under the rear of the shock. Push your right shoulder into the butt of the stock and push forward.

So what your doing is pulling at the bi-pod with your left arm while taking your fist has a rest and pushing forward with your right shoulder. You need to get where there is the same pressure so the barrel does not deviate to much....Free floating heps allot
Link Posted: 2/4/2006 9:43:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By edpmedic:
Have you tried holding the rifle down with a Sling. Put the Sling through the hole in the bi-pod and loop it around your left Bicep. Pull tight while taking your left hand and make a fist under the rear of the shock. Push your right shoulder into the butt of the stock and push forward.

So what your doing is pulling at the bi-pod with your left arm while taking your fist has a rest and pushing forward with your right shoulder. You need to get where there is the same pressure so the barrel does not deviate to much....Free floating heps allot



I'll try that. It sounds like it might help. The sling is attached to the swivel stud on the bipod. Do I need to reroute it?

A free float tube is definately in my future. As are handloads.
Jim
Link Posted: 2/4/2006 10:47:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By edpmedic:
Have you tried holding the rifle down with a Sling. Put the Sling through the hole in the bi-pod and loop it around your left Bicep. Pull tight while taking your left hand and make a fist under the rear of the shock. Push your right shoulder into the butt of the stock and push forward.

So what your doing is pulling at the bi-pod with your left arm while taking your fist has a rest and pushing forward with your right shoulder. You need to get where there is the same pressure so the barrel does not deviate to much....Free floating heps allot



+1 here.

Usually, when there is a lot of stringing either horizontally or vertically, the shooter, not the rifle, is doing something different.

It could be that 1/2 way thru a mag, you are getting a little tired and relaxing on the forward pressure on the 'pod. ANYthing that changes your grip, your cheek weld, your shooting position, WILL throw your aim off.

Try this: Load one round at a time, take time to find the EXACT position you had before, the same cheek weld, the same pressure on the shoulder, the same position of your arm under the rifle, same sling tension, etc. Take some time to fire each shot, I bet you'll find that your groups tighten up a lot!

Happy shooting.
Link Posted: 2/5/2006 2:09:58 PM EDT
I went out again today, and I believe the problem is solved. I pulled the rifle into my shoulder a little tighter- that helped. I pulled on the sling- that helped also.
I think the problem was that I was holding the rifle too loosely.

Now, to get a tighter pattern can someone recommend a turkey choke?

Next trip I will shoot for groups. Today was another familiarization session. I was getting around 1.5" to 2" groups.

That trigger has got to go though!

I was regularly hitting the 8" gong at 200 yards using a 100 yard zero, so I must be close to doing something right.

Jim
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:20:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 8:24:56 AM EDT by eye_spy]
That's good to know.

I was trying to search for pictures posted by members that would best illustrate what I was talking about but I could not find them anymore.

FWIW, here's the closest picture i could come up with. Not an AR, but you get the picture ... Same principle seated down.




ETA: Yes, it is much easier if you have a good trigger. Replace it with an aftermarket trigger (Chip or JP) or if your smith is good, just have him do a trigger job. That's what I did.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:28:45 AM EDT
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