Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 8/18/2003 10:08:30 PM EDT
I have a GAT trigger kit that I've had laying around for years. Are they actually legal to install in an AR15 or 10/22?

I'm going plinking next week, and I've never used it before, but I dont want to make a poor judgement call here.

Can you guys help me out? BTW, I'm in California if that has any bearing on the answer here....

Thanks
~smuggley
Link Posted: 8/18/2003 10:54:34 PM EDT
Yes, they are legal. These systems do not violate the ATF MG rule that says it's an MG if more one round is fired with a single action. Check your state laws though, I don't even like to hear about the draconian laws in Kalifornia...
Link Posted: 8/19/2003 6:25:28 PM EDT
I'll help you out...do NOT install it. It's a useless piece of shit that will make a nice scratch underneath your triggerguard. Learn to bump-fire instead.
Link Posted: 8/19/2003 6:46:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fistpoint: Learn to bump-fire instead.
View Quote
Bump fire?? Could someone please explain that? Mike
Link Posted: 8/19/2003 6:49:29 PM EDT
I'd like to see a trigger like the response trigger used on tippman paintball guns. You can really get the bullets to fly!
Link Posted: 8/19/2003 7:17:23 PM EDT
Trigger activators (ex: Hellfire, GAT, Triburst) are illegal in California. Dan
Link Posted: 8/19/2003 7:54:02 PM EDT
Thanks guys. I can always count on you folks to give me the straight answers. I will learn to bumpfire instead. Cheers ~smug
Link Posted: 8/20/2003 8:16:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/20/2003 8:31:46 AM EDT by jafager]
If by "response trigger" you mean the thing where you fire one shot on squeeze and one on release, IMHO it would be extremely dangerous to have something like that on a firearm (it sounds bad enough on a paintball gun). Releasing the trigger should make it *less* likely that you'll fire a shot. Anything else is counterintuitive and is guaranteed to lead to accidents. jafager
Link Posted: 8/20/2003 8:36:19 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jafager: If by "response trigger" you mean the thing where you fire one shot on squeeze and one on release, IMHO it would be extremely dangerous to have something like that on a firearm (it sounds bad enough on a paintball gun). Releasing the trigger should make it *less* likely that you'll fire a shot. Anything else is counterintuitive and is guaranteed to lead to accidents. jafager
View Quote
That's not how a response trigger works. Response triggers use pressurized gas to assist the user in actuating the trigger quickly and in a controlled manner.
Link Posted: 8/20/2003 8:37:03 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jafager: If by "response trigger" you mean the thing where you fire one shot on squeeze and one on release, IMHO it would be extremely dangerous to have something like that on a firearm (it sounds bad enough on a paintball gun). Releasing the trigger should make it *less* likely that you'll fire a shot. Anything else is counterintuitive and is guaranteed to lead to accidents. jafager
View Quote
The tippmann response trigger is a pneumatic cylender behind the trigger that uses a small amount of gas from firing to force the trigger forward. Its kinda like bump firing only the trigger does it for you. I have one on my 98 Custom and its neat. It would probably be illegal on a real gun though.
Link Posted: 8/20/2003 4:56:17 PM EDT
I deleted my first post which was "Yes, they really are legal, and Yes, they really suck, don't waste your money". Then I saw that you had already bought one and didn't want to flame you. I went on to say, save your money and learn to bump fire, at least that's free. All you need is a finger, the thumb next to it, and maybe a belt loop. The theory of operation is the same. With your offhand, hold the rifle forward of the trigger, like the forend/handguard. With your firing hand, put the thumb through a belt loop on the side your are holding the rifle, which you hold under your arm, and the finger on that hand on the trigger. Pull forward with your offhand while keeping your triggerfinger held back by your thumb/belt loop. The rifle will fire, and the recoil will push the rifle backwards. Keeping forward pressure with the offhand will pull the rifle forward again, causing you to pull the trigger. If you can find the sweet spot, you will can produce a continuous fire as the rifle rocks back and forth. It's just like many of the trigger systems except instead of a spring or what not, you are simply using your hand anchored to yourself. Do a thread search on bump firing and you will probably get a better explanation. The problem is, like many of the trigger systems, is that you cannot grip/hold your rifle with the firing hand, it must be held and pushed forward with the other. Some rifles will be too heavy, unbalanced, or you may not be able to grip and hold it adequately, especially while it fires continuously. Depends on the shooter, and it's not very safe if you loose the forward grip cause if it falls, the weight of the rifle will cause the finger still on the trigger, to fire while it swings down or wherever. If you are quick with your finger, and have a good trigger, you should be able to fire quickly enough to waste your ammo, just like real full auto. Full auto is only good for cover fire, room clearing, and entertainment, IMO, unless you have a really, really good muzzlebrake.
Link Posted: 8/21/2003 10:09:09 PM EDT
I've tried Bumpfiring with my 20" AR...It never worked....workes flawlessly with my AK though, and damn it's awesome! Come to think of it, it may not have worked with my AR due to the weight of the rifle. I'll give my M4 a shot (pun intended) Then again, it has a muzzle break so that might take away from the nessessary recoil.. AHHHHH!
Link Posted: 8/22/2003 5:16:31 AM EDT
I tried bump firing my M1A ONE time and had a hard time getting off of the trigger! Forget about accuracy with bump firing!
Top Top