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Posted: 7/20/2003 2:01:49 PM EDT
Is it bad for an AR15 ?
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 2:27:39 PM EDT
Nope. As long as the upper receiver and bolt/carrier are in place, it won't hurt a thing.
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 2:30:06 PM EDT
No, it won't hurt your weapon. If it really bothers you, get a couple of snap caps.
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 5:48:40 PM EDT
"Nope. As long as the upper receiver and bolt/carrier are in place, it won't hurt a thing. " Zardoz brings up an important point, as long as the all the above items are in place you are ok, missing that upper and thats bad. dry firing is one of the best ways to get a feel for your trigger...Jason
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 6:18:12 PM EDT
I went to a Colt armorer course earlier this year. Instructor said it won't hurt a thing.
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 6:50:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By firefighter2904: "Nope. As long as the upper receiver and bolt/carrier are in place, it won't hurt a thing. " Zardoz brings up an important point, as long as the all the above items are in place you are ok, missing that upper and thats bad. dry firing is one of the best ways to get a feel for your trigger...Jason
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In case you were wondering ralbano, they mean that you'll break off your bolt stop if you dry fire w/o the upper attached.
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 7:59:22 PM EDT
Thanks, Guys.
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 8:44:07 PM EDT
Dry fireing only hurts rimfire rifles. In a center fire rifle the fireing pin hits in the center of the chamber which means that if there's no cartridge in it just hits air. In a rimfire rifle the fireing pin strikes the rim of the case that is on the ouside edge of the camber opening. If there is no cartridge in the chamber the fireing pin strikes the ouside edge of the chamber. This can damage the chamber and the fireing pin. Thats why you should not dry fire a rimfire rifle.
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 10:12:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Gun_Addict: Dry fireing only hurts rimfire rifles. In a center fire rifle the fireing pin hits in the center of the chamber which means that if there's no cartridge in it just hits air. In a rimfire rifle the fireing pin strikes the rim of the case that is on the ouside edge of the camber opening. If there is no cartridge in the chamber the fireing pin strikes the ouside edge of the chamber. This can damage the chamber and the fireing pin. Thats why you should not dry fire a rimfire rifle.
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Are you sure about that? I've always thought that centerfire calibers can break the firing pin through dry-fireing...The manual of my 9mm 92FS advised against it. Not saying you're lying or bullshiting, I'm just curious if i've got my story straight. Thanks
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 11:31:15 PM EDT
As a firearms instructor I will have each student give me on average five hammer falls for each actual round fired, just to familiarize themselves with the weapon, and trigger.(Novices) There are even some weapons that you have to dry fire in order to disassemble. (Glock) I have done the dry fire drill with ARs, shotguns,revolvers, and autos. Never once have I seen a weapon malfunction/break because of it.
Link Posted: 7/21/2003 5:53:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/22/2003 5:58:46 AM EDT by Forest]
Originally Posted By Lockedon: Are you sure about that?
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If he isn't, I am.
I've always thought that centerfire calibers can break the firing pin through dry-fireing
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Only on poorly made parts (those lacking proper heat treatment). For example my CZ-52 can't be dry fired w/o breaking the firing pin (stanard FP on those were not heat treated and thus brittle). OTH my Rugers and Glock have no issues dry firing - but they are much higher quality firearms. I'm really surprised your Barretta would advise against it.
Link Posted: 7/21/2003 8:31:04 AM EDT
Other than that, there is a general admonition to not ever dry fire, for safety reasons. Turns out that some dry fires weren't, with sometimes disastrous results. I will do it only after making sure there is no magazine in the gun and no ammunition in the chamber. With free-running firing pins, like the AR, I don't like to dry fire at all because the shoulder of the pin is rammed into the firing pin hole with a lot of force from the fairly strong hammer strike. On a pistol with a firing pin spring, there is some relief from the force of the impact. Also, many free-running firing pins can retrofitted with springs, also reducing the chance of slam-fires.
Link Posted: 7/21/2003 4:25:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 1saxman: Other than that, there is a general admonition to not ever dry fire, for safety reasons. Turns out that some dry fires weren't, with sometimes disastrous results. I will do it only after making sure there is no magazine in the gun and no ammunition in the chamber. With free-running firing pins, like the AR, I don't like to dry fire at all because the shoulder of the pin is rammed into the firing pin hole with a lot of force from the fairly strong hammer strike. On a pistol with a firing pin spring, there is some relief from the force of the impact. Also, many free-running firing pins can retrofitted with springs, also reducing the chance of slam-fires.
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Gee; guess I shouldn't have been dry firing my SP1 1500-2000 times a year for the past 25 years, huh? [:D]
Link Posted: 7/21/2003 4:35:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2003 4:36:34 PM EDT by Boomholzer]
I generally dont dry fire anything repeatidly without a snap-cap. I will atleast dry-fire ARs, AKs and revolvers (no snap-cap) without cringing. I'm especially cautious with non-military sporting arms such as bolt actions. I dont have any reasoning or argument. I guess I was cautious with most firearms I have due to ignorance.
Link Posted: 7/21/2003 6:06:17 PM EDT
I cracked all of my receivers by dry firing.
Link Posted: 7/21/2003 7:25:00 PM EDT
Yes I'm sure, I was told this by remington when I E mailed them about dry fireing my 597. (wich is a .22lr)
Link Posted: 7/21/2003 10:23:51 PM EDT
I snapped off the tip of the firing pin in my CZ52 by dry firing it too. "Click" "tic tic tic" as the tip rolled out of the barrel. On the other hand, I have dry fired a M1911A1 a gazillion times during security watch changes and it never hurt those old Colts a bit.
Link Posted: 7/22/2003 4:16:37 AM EDT
My Ruger rimfire .22 10-22 gets dry fired almost every time the magazine runs out. (The bolt doesn't lock back on this rifle when the last round is fired and I lose count of # of rounds fired.) No firing pin problems so far.
Link Posted: 7/22/2003 6:00:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 1saxman: Other than that, there is a general admonition to not ever dry fire, for safety reasons.
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Says who? Every trainer I've ever had the pleasure of learning from recommend dryfiring. Hanguns and rifle - match and 'tactical' shooting. Dry firing is good practice.
Link Posted: 7/22/2003 1:12:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Forest:
Originally Posted By 1saxman: Other than that, there is a general admonition to not ever dry fire, for safety reasons.
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Says who? Every trainer I've ever had the pleasure of learning from recommend dryfiring. Hanguns and rifle - match and 'tactical' shooting. Dry firing is good practice.
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He means you could have an AD
Link Posted: 7/22/2003 2:22:49 PM EDT
FWIW I dry fired my ar in the kitched and it cost me $136.00 to replace a double window. I nnnneeeeeeeevvvvvvveeeeeeerrrrr leave a round in the chamber. Well OK maybe I did once!!!!!!! Remember the four rules, one being ALWAYS CHECK THE CHAMBER.........
Link Posted: 7/22/2003 3:07:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/22/2003 3:08:24 PM EDT by Ohio]
Originally Posted By 1saxman: I will do it only after making sure there is no magazine in the gun and no ammunition in the chamber.
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I make it a point that there is no ammo in the [b]room[/b] when I dryfire. Just makes me happier.
Link Posted: 7/22/2003 3:29:47 PM EDT
Excessive dry firing will make hair grow on the palm of your hands, and eventually it will make you go blind.
Link Posted: 7/22/2003 9:34:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Derek45: Excessive dry firing will make hair grow on the palm of your hands, and eventually it will make you go blind.
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ROFLMAO
Link Posted: 7/23/2003 3:59:34 AM EDT
FWIW I dry fired my ar in the kitched and it cost me $136.00 to replace a double window.
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I bet a .223 is really loud in the house! (I know that a .22 rimfire is! [:D]
Link Posted: 7/23/2003 10:42:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By magneto: I bet a .223 is really loud in the house! (I know that a .22 rimfire is! [:D]
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I've always wanted to try that with my .22lr[}:D]
Link Posted: 7/23/2003 2:06:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Derek45: Excessive dry firing will make hair grow on the palm of your hands, and eventually it will make you go blind.
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hahahahahahahaha!!!! im already wearing corrective lenses!!!! and that mach 3 turbo just wont get every little stubble on my palms!!!
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