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Posted: 1/8/2006 8:05:45 AM EDT
Looking for some honest opinions, clarification, etc.

Do you folks think of the word 'Cop' as a trigger word?

My uncle is a retired LEO from Detroit - he retired about 79 or 80. He was on the Metro Squad during the riots of 67, and rode a bike around Detroit for many years. And it was a Harley. IIRC he was in the 13th.

Anyway, I used the word 'Cop' around him once as a teenager, and he schooled me about not using that word again. He told me it was disrespectful, and all LEOs felt the same. If you check my posts, you'll see I still use LEO instead.

I spent almost 4 years working around LEOs back in the mid 80s, and that word was occasionally used by them to describe themselves.

Was that a generational thing, regional thing? It was derogatory back in the 70s but not now?

It came up in conversation this morning, and I finally said FI and asked here.

Appreciate it.

Link Posted: 1/8/2006 9:37:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 12:21:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2006 12:21:47 PM EDT by Bucky145]
Cop to me means police officer as most of the negative meaning has been lost. I do not think just because someone calls me a cop it's disrespectful. Its all in the tone they use it. Some folks can really tell off a LEO and use Sir and still be very rude. I have seen some LEOs get all upset by the use of the word cop, but I'm not as demanding of respect towards myself just because I'm a LEO. Either way, they get the last word and I get the last act.

Hell, I'm even warming up to JBT.....ok maybe thats too far for in person conversations.

Link Posted: 1/8/2006 1:11:44 PM EDT
The other day - well last weekend - I was talking with 2 BPAs, and got around to a class they took; 'sensitivity, trigger words, etc.' I asked about this word, and they didn't see a problem, but like above as long as it wasn't used with disrespect. Also told me they knew it was a bad word, but in years gone by.

I asked my uncle about 1.5 yrs ago when he visited, and just got the 'it's disrespectful' speech.

Glock918,

We used to use that 'heck of a nice guy' statement when a boss was around and we wanted to call someone an AH. Didn't take him long to catch on.

Anyway, thanks guys.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:13:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:47:49 PM EDT
My personal opinion is that being called a cop is no different than being called a deputy. It does not bother me to be called a cop, as most poeple simply associate it with being the police. I can think of many other things I have been called on duty that were much more disrespectful than being called a cop.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 6:32:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2006 6:34:25 PM EDT by bigern]
Got called WhiteDevil my first day of FTO. And, yes, it is pronounced as one word.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 7:32:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NorCal_LEO:
Its better than Rookie, Barney Fife, Youngster, Po-leece man, Cracker, Trick, A**hole, One time, Po Po, Whiteboy, Wiggum, Porky, Bull, Fool, Hack, Punk, Bossman, D***head, The Man, Motherf***er, Sweetchuck, C***s***er, County Mountie, Pig, Swine, Crooked-a**-motherf***er, Furman, Boy, Boss, Dudley Do-Right, Tired-a** fool, C**k, White Devil, Biz-natch, Puto, Five-oh, Fuzz, Meter Peter, Ca-fe, Maricone, and Bacon though.



What NorCal doesn't mention is he was called all that... in one shift.

<­BR>
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 8:58:19 PM EDT
The word Cop first came about as an acronym from Citizens On Patrol I was told back in the first part of the 1900's. I haven't found out why it's supposed to be disrespectful. I don't take it that way. If I'm going to be set off, it's going to be something anyone can understand why.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:56:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 3:57:07 PM EDT by Pointman_M4A1]
my personal favorite that I have been called is "fascist pig" but that was from someone who was having his a** handed to him after resisting arrest.

Almost makes you want to practice your goose step.

MP SSG
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:05:17 PM EDT
Citizens on Patrol...that's interesting...that's the first time I've heard that it was an abbreviation.

Anyway, thanks for the responses, guys.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:37:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Backstop:
Citizens on Patrol...that's interesting...that's the first time I've heard that it was an abbreviation.

Anyway, thanks for the responses, guys.



Citizen On Patrol,
Constable On Patrol,
short for the copper badges or copper buttons on the uniforms
or the word cop from the 1700's that means to nab or apprehend.
Take your choice.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:45:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Backstop:
Do you folks think of the word 'Cop' as a trigger word?

My uncle is a retired LEO from Detroit - ............................Anyway, I used the word 'Cop' around him once as a teenager, and he schooled me about not using that word again. He told me it was disrespectful, and all LEOs felt the same.......




I do not think it is offensive and know a lot of cops that think it is a sign of maturity in the profession. You can be an officer when you come out of the academy but you are yet to be a "Cop" until you have experienced the job enough or have earned your way. It may also be which part of the country you are from as to whether it is offensive. That is the case with a lot of police slang, terminology, codes, et.

My personal opinion is that if a cop is offended by the word cop, then he is too sensitive for the job.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:24:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Tango7:

Originally Posted By NorCal_LEO:
Its better than Rookie, Barney Fife, Youngster, Po-leece man, Cracker, Trick, A**hole, One time, Po Po, Whiteboy, Wiggum, Porky, Bull, Fool, Hack, Punk, Bossman, D***head, The Man, Motherf***er, Sweetchuck, C***s***er, County Mountie, Pig, Swine, Crooked-a**-motherf***er, Furman, Boy, Boss, Dudley Do-Right, Tired-a** fool, C**k, White Devil, Biz-natch, Puto, Five-oh, Fuzz, Meter Peter, Ca-fe, Maricone, and Bacon though.



What NorCal doesn't mention is he was called all that... in one shift.

<­BR>



In a thread in the mod/staff forum
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 9:36:09 AM EDT
I don't take myself , or life in general, that seriously.
I am a Texas Peace Officer....that's what my license says.
I'm a cop.
The TV show is called COPS.
I do not consider it a slur. When it is prefaced by Fu**ing....it is not good.
The word cop is now ingrained in our culture and means police.
No big deal.
I have been called many things on the job.
What badguys don't know is that I run a lottery....call me "fuzz" one night and you may walk, "heat" on another, "the man" might get you in the pot.
Pig....will get you a beating Just kidding. I don't beat people that don't fight me.
My family have been cops since the 1950's. Never heard any of them bristle at the word cop.
But this was Chicago.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 9:53:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/11/2006 9:54:56 AM EDT by Seth_Livzz]

Originally Posted By tvc184:

Originally Posted By Backstop:
Citizens on Patrol...that's interesting...that's the first time I've heard that it was an abbreviation.

Anyway, thanks for the responses, guys.



Citizen On Patrol,
Constable On Patrol,
short for the copper badges or copper buttons on the uniforms
or the word cop from the 1700's that means to nab or apprehend.
Take your choice.



Close, it comes from way back when the Brits wore copper helmets.

I have no idea why any cop would feel being called a "cop" would be derogatory.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 10:06:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Seth_Livzz:

Originally Posted By tvc184:

Originally Posted By Backstop:
Citizens on Patrol...that's interesting...that's the first time I've heard that it was an abbreviation.

Anyway, thanks for the responses, guys.



Citizen On Patrol,
Constable On Patrol,
short for the copper badges or copper buttons on the uniforms
or the word cop from the 1700's that means to nab or apprehend.
Take your choice.



Close, it comes from way back when the Brits wore copper helmets.

I have no idea why any cop would feel being called a "cop" would be derogatory.



Because at one time is was used as a slur against PO's
Like calling someone from Japan a Jap.
Just shortens the word up, but it is disrespectful.
My father doesn't like being called a "cop", but he doesn't take offense, as that is the accepted term for PO nowadays.
If you really want to get his goat, call him Law Enforcement.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 12:30:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tvc184:

Originally Posted By Backstop:
Do you folks think of the word 'Cop' as a trigger word?

My uncle is a retired LEO from Detroit - ............................Anyway, I used the word 'Cop' around him once as a teenager, and he schooled me about not using that word again. He told me it was disrespectful, and all LEOs felt the same.......




I do not think it is offensive and know a lot of cops that think it is a sign of maturity in the profession. You can be an officer when you come out of the academy but you are yet to be a "Cop" until you have experienced the job enough or have earned your way. It may also be which part of the country you are from as to whether it is offensive. That is the case with a lot of police slang, terminology, codes, et.

My personal opinion is that if a cop is offended by the word cop, then he is too sensitive for the job.




I think it's kind of a regional thing also-when I was a COP in Illinois, we called ourselves cops as did the general public. When I moved to Texas and was in the academy I made a reference to "cops" and was told not-so-politely that in Texas we are police officers or "po'leece."
I'll take cop over "po'leece" any ol' day.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 2:24:05 PM EDT
I guess it's a "where you come from" sort of thing. I have no negative connotations about the word and usually refer to myself as a cop. For some odd reason though, I feel uneasy when someone calls me "boss" and I honestly don't know why.
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