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Posted: 11/26/2001 1:04:48 PM EDT
Okay History buffs, what are your favorite history books? [sniper] Californian by birth, Texan by choice.
Link Posted: 11/26/2001 1:24:01 PM EDT
1)The life and times of Peter the Great, by Robert Massey. Excellent book about the era in a critical time in Russki history. 2) Attacks, by Erwin Rommel - an autobiography of a very skillful small unit commander in WW1. The author gained an enviable reputation during WW2. (duh!) 3) Several of the first person accounts of allied soldiers during WW1 and 2 - "With British Snipers to the Reich," Dunlop's book, "Ordnance went up front," etc. Several of the Stackpole books. 4) The trilogy of Speer's books. I havent read them since high school and the author seemed very self serving, but they paint a good picture of political life in the third Reich. 5) "Stalin," don't recall the author. Thick book missing the cover. I pick it up every now and then when something regarding the Stalin era makes the news to put the news item in context. A lot of insight into Stalin written so soon after his death, considering the USSR was still around.
Link Posted: 11/26/2001 2:22:45 PM EDT
First person accounts of the way things were.
Link Posted: 11/28/2001 12:25:10 PM EDT
Oh boy! This is going to be a long list an din no particular order here's some of my favorites: Band of Brothers The Longest Day A Bridge Too Far The Last Battle Black Hawk Down Half A Wing, Three Engines and A Prayer The Civil War: A Narrative(All 3 Volumes) Battle Cry Of Freedom The Framing of the Consitition Miracle In Philadelphia Robert The Bruce William Wallace Just to name a few. [:)]
Link Posted: 11/29/2001 12:37:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/29/2001 12:30:06 AM EDT by Atencio]
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee The Holocaust oh and any books by Sven Hassel
Link Posted: 11/29/2001 3:49:11 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 6:23:35 AM EDT
Gotta add "Flags of Our Fathers" to the list. This is about the Iwo invasion and the 5 marines and 1 navy corpsman in the famous flag raising photograph.
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 6:51:47 AM EDT
The Rise & Fall of the Third Reich - It could happen to you The Forgotten Soldier - Personal experiences of a German Mechanized Infantryman on the Eastern Front We Were Soldiers Once, and Young - Early Vietnam combat experience Street Without Joy - Philosophical and practical look at the Vietnam War
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 7:24:51 AM EDT
Most of my history came out of College textbooks. But, Do You Count: The Jungle By Upton Sinclair
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 8:30:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By cc48510: Most of my history came out of College textbooks. But, Do You Count: The Jungle By Upton Sinclair
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only till it started getting preachy toward the end, damn communists.
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 9:42:02 AM EDT
Yeah, it quickly became nothing more than 1 more Communist Manifesto.
Originally Posted By Atencio:
Originally Posted By cc48510: Most of my history came out of College textbooks. But, Do You Count: The Jungle By Upton Sinclair
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only till it started getting preachy toward the end, damn communists.
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Link Posted: 12/8/2001 9:49:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/8/2001 9:47:10 AM EDT by Coz_45-age-caliber]
Guadalcanal Diary Bury my heart at Wounded Knee Blackhawk Down (just finishing it) Mountain Men Edited to add a forgotten title The book on which the movie "The Big Red One" was based. May not be historically perfect but one heckuva read.
Link Posted: 12/9/2001 12:06:13 PM EDT
Encyclopedia Brittanica GG
Link Posted: 12/9/2001 12:07:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By blackrifle51: Okay History buffs, what are your favorite history books? [sniper] Californian by birth, Texan by choice.
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Sorry to bust you bubble, but you will never be a Texan. GG
Link Posted: 12/16/2001 3:03:38 PM EDT
Ditto on MTweanie's recommendation of Forgotten Soldier. Another of my favorite's Popski's Private Army by Vladim Peniakoff account of long range desert operations behind enemy lines, in extremely severe conditions & then on to behind enemy line operations in Italy in their tricked out Jeeps. My feeling is the TV series Rat Patrol may be based upon this unit.
Link Posted: 12/26/2001 7:45:19 PM EDT
I am very partial to any book by Stephen Ambrose. My favorite was Band of Brothers.
Link Posted: 1/4/2002 6:37:11 AM EDT
Read a few autobiographies of commanders, Patton, Ulysses S Grant. Read the Entire History of WWII (Time Life)30 or so volumes Read some of the Civil War Collection (Hard Tack and Coffee, Daily minutiae of a Soldier, Ulysses S Grant, Mosbies Rangers, Grant) READ ABOUT AIRBORNE OPS IN WWII Reading now SEALS UDT/SEAL OPS IN VIETNAM LRRPS THE STORY OF THE RANGERS IN VIETNAM BLACKHAWK DOWN
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 10:20:54 AM EDT
"Frozen Hell- Retreat from Chosin" or something like that. This author was **unbelieveable** in his research. He tracks the name of the point man on the lead platoon of the lead company in North Korea when the Chinese hit. He then chronicles the horrors that involved the fighting retreat as well as the WORTHLESS US Army units who abandoned their wounded & weapons & simply ran in the face of the enemy. Damn fine book.
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 12:26:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Atencio: Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
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This book is very bad revisionism. It was based on real accounts of the Indians, but "cherrypicked" to make the author's point. The Indians were interviewed some 30 years before Dee Brown wrote [i]Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee[/i] by another historian. The original historian found that the Indian accounts could not be put together to create a coherent story without systematically selecting some accounts over others. He was unwilling to do so, so he left his manuscript in a raw form. Dee Brown wrote [i]Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee[/i] based upon the raw manuscript, telling the story he choose to tell by selecting the Indian accounts that made the point he wanted, and ignoring those that contradicted this.
Link Posted: 1/11/2002 4:30:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DonS:
Originally Posted By Atencio: Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
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This book is very bad revisionism. It was based on real accounts of the Indians, but "cherrypicked" to make the author's point. The Indians were interviewed some 30 years before Dee Brown wrote [i]Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee[/i] by another historian. The original historian found that the Indian accounts could not be put together to create a coherent story without systematically selecting some accounts over others. He was unwilling to do so, so he left his manuscript in a raw form. Dee Brown wrote [i]Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee[/i] based upon the raw manuscript, telling the story he choose to tell by selecting the Indian accounts that made the point he wanted, and ignoring those that contradicted this.
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you could probably say that about all history books, slanted to how the author wants it. Still I enjoyed reading the book.
Link Posted: 1/13/2002 1:20:27 PM EDT
"The Complete History of WWII" cira.1950 great book
Link Posted: 1/13/2002 3:42:27 PM EDT
The art of War....Sun Tzu Claudius the God...Robert Graves Don Quixote....Cervantes Ottoman Centuries....Lord Kindross Black Elk Speaks Fatal Shore....Hughes Good by to all that...Robert Graves(WW1) All quite on the Western Front...Remarque(WW1) T.E. Lawerence (WW1) Panzer Leader Gen. Heintz Gudierian (WW2) While England Slept.....Churchill (WW2) Churchill: Young Lion....? " Mien Kamph...A. Hitler " anything by Elie Wietzel " War and Trauma....Grinker and Speigel " 'Hell in a very small place' Bernard Fall 1st IC war 'Chickenhawk'....Robert Mason 2nd IC war 'No Greater Love'....Robert Donahue " 'Blackjack 33'.......Robert Donahue " ' Absolution'......Charles J. Boyle " 'The Cross and the Tomb, a history of the first Crusades......Robert Payne 'The interrogation of Joan' of Arc..K.Armstrong 'The Valley of the Assassins'...Freya Stark 'The closing of the American Mind...A. Bloom Speer reloading manual, 12 edition..... SAS Handbook AR15/M16: a practial guide....D. Long 'On Killing, The psychological cost of learning to kill in war and society'... Lt. Col. Dave Grossman Waiting for the publishing of Clinton's 'show and tell all' autobiography, 'Sox made me do it'
Link Posted: 1/13/2002 3:48:35 PM EDT
A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn
Link Posted: 1/13/2002 4:27:23 PM EDT
Josephus- Jewish War. When Jesus and the Apostles entered the Temple for the last time they said..."See Lord what manner of stones!" They marveled at the 30 foot long, 6 ton single stones of the wall of the Temples limestone construction. Jesus said "There is not one stone here which will not be thrown down"... Josephus led the resistance from Jotapata against the Romans during the Jewish civil war of 70 AD. He was captured, and forced to become an interpreter. In his spare time he wrote this 500 page history. It is fabulous!
Link Posted: 1/14/2002 12:37:21 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/14/2002 8:38:04 AM EDT
My most recent favorites: [i]Conquest : Montezuma, Cortes, and the Fall of Old Mexico[/i] by Hugh Thomas [url]http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0671511041/qid=1011028547/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_27_4/002-0650206-9089658[/url] [i]Texian Iliad : A Military History of the Texas Revolution, 1835-1836 [/i] by Stephen L. Hardin [url]http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0292731027/qid=1011029125/sr=1-2/ref=sr_1_74_3/002-0650206-9089658[/url] I'm currently reading [i]Gotterdammerung 1945: Germany's Last Stand in the East[/i] by Russ Schneider. Good book, but depressing.
Link Posted: 1/26/2002 5:45:45 AM EDT
How To Make War James Dunnigan The Guns of August Barbra Tuchman The March of Folly Barbra Tuchman Sherman's March Burke Davis The Arms of Krupp William Manchester A Bridge to Far Cornelius Ryan The Killer Angels Micheal Shaara Dark Sun Richard Rhodes The End of the line Robert Pisor The last Battle Cornelius Ryan The Sixth Extinction Richard Leaky
Link Posted: 1/26/2002 5:50:43 AM EDT
"Blackhawk Down"
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