Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 3/11/2002 11:40:47 AM EDT
[i]This seemed a little bit too far OT for "ilikelegs" overheating post...[/i] No one said so, but there seem to be more than a just few "overclockers" here? [:D]
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 11:43:16 AM EDT
what the hell is an overclocker?
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 11:46:28 AM EDT
Basically it is "hotrodding" your pc's processor to run faster by changing some settings.
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 11:47:41 AM EDT
cool. how can i di it???? gateway 700x pentium 4
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 11:50:34 AM EDT
I'm running a pentium 4 1.5 ghz with liquid cooling overclocked to 2.1 ghz. I also have a highly modified case with lexan side panels and a dual front and rear mounted circulation fans. I also have a spiffy cold cathode lighting kit. It gets tons of looks at LAN parties. I'm working on building a case out of a Cocktail refriderator too.
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 11:55:02 AM EDT
Celeron II 566@852Mhz here. :)
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 12:02:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/11/2002 12:04:48 PM EDT by Gloftoe]
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 12:10:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By quietshoez: cool. how can i di it???? gateway 700x pentium 4
View Quote
There is a downside to overclocking. As alluded to earlier you will generate much more heat, you will burn up your processor if you aren't careful and your system will very likely become less stable than what you are used to now.
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 12:20:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 12:40:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/11/2002 12:41:08 PM EDT by CounterStrike]
The computer routing my cable connection is an Abit BP6 running dual celeron 366 @ 550. This setup has been run practically 24/7 for almost two and a half years, solid as a rock. I'd love to get rid of it but they don't fetch much on Ebay anymore and the truth is other then the newest games, nothing can really bog it down so its hard to justify replacing it.
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 12:46:57 PM EDT
I've been overclocking since I had my Celeron 300a @ 464Mhz. Now I run my Tbird1.13 @ 1.5Ghz. Have a huge Swiftech heatsink on there, the MC-462. Never get above 45C. Overclocking is a way to get big dollar performance out of a much less expensive CPU. Sure the lifetime is reduced, but I don't expect to use a processor for more than two years at most anyway. toast
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 2:06:47 PM EDT
Northwood 1.6 at 2332Mhz, stable as a rock! Jeff
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 2:37:49 PM EDT
Celery 566 running at 700mhz here, on an old Abit BH6. Wouldn't do 850. [>Q]
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 2:54:12 PM EDT
i started with a celeron 300a@ 450 back in the day when 450 was as fast as you could go
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 3:05:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By G-lock: Northwood 1.6 at 2332Mhz, stable as a rock! Jeff
View Quote
Jeff, can you give more details about your setup? I haven't overclocked since the celeron 300a at 464MHz, so I've been out of the loop for a while. I've heard that the northwood has a lot of potential due to the smaller core.
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 3:43:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Armed_Scientist: I'm running a pentium 4 1.5 ghz with liquid cooling overclocked to 2.1 ghz. I also have a highly modified case with lexan side panels and a dual front and rear mounted circulation fans. I also have a spiffy cold cathode lighting kit. It gets tons of looks at LAN parties. I'm working on building a case out of a Cocktail refriderator too.
View Quote
pics?
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:04:07 PM EDT
OK come on now. How do I become a overclocker?
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:28:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:34:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By zonan:
Originally Posted By G-lock: Northwood 1.6 at 2332Mhz, stable as a rock! Jeff
View Quote
Jeff, can you give more details about your setup? I haven't overclocked since the celeron 300a at 464MHz, so I've been out of the loop for a while. I've heard that the northwood has a lot of potential due to the smaller core.
View Quote
Sure, Gigabyte 8srx SIS645 Chipset, stock air cooling, 256 Meg DDR, GeForce2Ti. Was an upgrade to my BH6 Celly 600@1008Mhz, board started to die so I turned it into a novell server. Thing will post a 2560 but not reliable, without a voltage bump. Best 400 bucks I ever spent. Let me know if you need anything else. Jeff
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:46:22 PM EDT
Dale007: OK come on now. How do I become a overclocker?
View Quote
You read [url=http://www.overclockers.com/tips444/] this;[/url] "OVERCLOCKING BASIC TRAINING" OK all you overclocking rookies! Thinking about upgrading your wimpy computer into a lean, mean, overclocking machine? So, you want to become an expert computer tweaker? Then you've come to the right place. This article will arm you with general overclocking information most of us with overclocking experience seem to take for granted that "newbies" already know. However, from the trend of the questions asked by many beginner overclockers, maybe not everyone actually does know the overclocking basics. Read on and you too can join the ranks of the few, the proud, the computer overclockers. I will assume that you already know at least a little about working on computers. Hopefully, you aren't afraid to open up the case to install a new PCI card or swap harddrives. You do have enough sense to unplug the power cord before opening up your computer case, right? I will also assume that you know static electricity can kill electronic components, especially CPUs, so you should always ground yourself on the metal computer chassis before working inside the case. I usually rest my bare wrist against a non-painted metal surface of the case as I work. You really don't need a lot of fancy tools. Most work can be accomplished by just using a Phillips screwdriver, a regular screwdriver, and a pair of needle nosed pliers. What is Overclocking? Quite simply: Overclocking is running your computer at a faster clock speed than the manufacturer's specifications. But, why do we overclock our computers? Well, this brings us to the philosophy of overclocking. Different people have different reasons for overclocking. For some, it's to save money by maximizing their computer components. Gamers overclock in order to increase frame rates in their favorite 3D game. For others, it's a challenging hobby, not unlike hotrodding a car. A few folks do it for bragging rights and to have a faster computer than their buddies. Personally, I do it for all of these reasons and much more. I get a great sense of pride when I say, "Yeah, I built this sweet machine all by myself (with a little advice from my Overclockers.com Forum friends), plus it benchmarks faster and cost much less than a store bought OEM computer!" Overclocking Disclaimers No two computers will overclock the same, even if they're identical. Just because "Joe Overclocker" is running his Celeron chip at two million MHz, does not mean that your CPU will do the same. Often, it's several different factors (including luck) that allow some systems to overclock more than others. There are absolutely no guarantees in overclocking. Despite your computer geek skills and knowledge, you are dealing with random chance to a degree. Is there a risk of damaging components when overclocking? Why yes, of course. However, if you use common sense and follow the basic guidelines laid out in this article, then the risks are extremely low to nearly non-existent. Too much heat and too much voltage are the most frequent methods of frying components. Overclock at your own risk! Don't blame me if you toast a component! Also, most warranties are void if they find out you were overclocking.
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:46:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Paul: Save the money, wait 6 months and buy the same machine not-overclocked not with a voided warranty and enjoy. The applications have been following the CPU's for a long while now. The hot-rods of the 1950's are still worth something today. An overclocked PC is worthless in 18 months. It is an interesting and narrow hobby though. Saw come cool liquid cooled PC's at ComDex.
View Quote
Paul- Why is an overclocked machine worthless in 18 months, I've used all over my overclocked machines for 2 plus years before an upgrade. But, then I build from parts and pieces rather than buying pre-assembled machine cause I just want what I want and can't justify the cost of a whole new machine, also this takes care of the warranty issue for me. But hey I'm a network geek for a living and can take care of my own stuff. I'd be surprised if you can get a 2.3 gig 145 FSB P4 in the next year so I'm way ahead of the game. Just my two cents. Jeff
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:48:41 PM EDT
Basic Overclocking Components Computer Case: There are two schools of thought here: One is to take a generic cheap-o case, cut and hack holes into it, and then mount a host of fans into the newly modded case. Most cases have one exhaust fan at the power supply and one intake fan in the front lower area. You probably need at least two more case fans, another intake and exhaust. Plan ahead when installing extra fans. For example, put the intakes all in the front and the exhaust fans in the back, so they're not fighting each other. For those that aren't handy with power tools or just plain lack the time to modify a case, then spend the extra money and get a good case with all the cooling stuff already built into it. Consider getting a case big enough where nothing overhangs the motherboard. Removable mobo tray and side panels are great features. Power Supply: You need a good quality power supply for overclocking, because bumping up the CPU core voltage, using multiple fans, water cooling pumps, and other stuff like that requires lots of extra wattage. Most cases already have a power supply. If you tried to save money by getting a cheap generic case, then you got a cheap generic 235 watt power supply too. In my opinion, a 300 watt power supply is minimum nowadays, and if you're ever planning on running a power hungry AMD processor or peltier, then think about buying a 400w unit. Motherboard: It does not pay to be cheap here. If you can't afford a good motherboard, then save some bucks, mow some lawns for extra cash, beg your spouse, borrow from Mom and Dad, or do whatever you have to do to get enough money to buy a high quality motherboard. DO NOT SKIMP! This is the heart of your machine. Personally, I like Abit and Asus. You want a mobo with lots of FSB and voltage adjustments that can be easily changed in the BIOS. CPU: Do a whole bunch of research, ask lots of questions, and then do a fair amount of shopping around before investing in a processor. Look at the Overclockers.com CPU database to see which chips have been successfully overclocked. Personally, the best Intel chip for your overclocking buck right now is the Celeron 600 or the P-III 700. I don't have much AMD experience, but the Duron or the Athlon are very definitely worth considering too. Choose which motherboard you want first and then find a CPU to match your system. COOLING!: This is extremely important when you're overclocking. I can't stress cooling enough. Heat is the enemy! Do not try to raise the core voltage until you have good cooling. Forget the factory retail CPU heatsink and fan. Forget the Golden ORB, it's overclocking days are over. For the price, it's real hard to beat GlobalWin or Alpha coolers right now. When installing your CPU cooler, use a good quality thermal paste. Do not attempt to use that crappy thermal tape that comes with most coolers. Arctic Silver thermal paste is probably the best. However, for the budget minded, Radio Shack thermal paste is a good substitute.
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:50:22 PM EDT
Other things you can do to improve cooling are as simple and cheap as rerouting power wires and securing them out of the way. Additionally, round your flat data cables by wrapping them with electrical or duct tape and moving them out of the way. This trick vastly improves air circulation through the case interior and cost very little to do. RAM Memory: This is another place that you should not get cheap generic parts. Buy the best and the most you can afford. The minimum should be PC-133, preferably one 256 meg stick rather than two 128 meg modules. Mushkin, Crucial, Kingmax, and Corsair are all good brands. Lots of PC-150 memory available right now too. Choose CAS-2 rated RAM because it's faster and more overclockable than the normal CAS-3 memory. Video Card: Fortunately, most of the newer AGP 3D video cards seem quite tolerant to overclocking. I prefer the GeForce 2 video cards, especially the Hercules brand, but there are lots of other good GF2 cards on the market. Many folks swear by the Radeon cards too, but I don't have any personal experience with them. The 3dfx Voodoo cards are real decent graphics cards, but they went out of business, so future support will be non-existent; I'd probably avoid the Voodoo cards if I were you. There is a new budget video card out called Kryo II that is looking promising, but we don't know how well they'll overclock yet. Harddrives: High quality harddrives are worth there weight in gold to the overclocker. Extreme overclocking can cause data corruption and, in rare occasions, scramble your harddrive. Usually the drive is not permanently damaged and can be reformatted, but it's a huge hassle if you don't have your data backed up. Plan on spending a little extra and get a fast ATA100 harddrive that spins at 7,200 RPM - if your motherboard supports it. Maxtor has a great warranty and I've had good luck with them, but right now the overclocking king is the IBM harddrive in either the 20 gig or 30 gig flavor. Other Components: Overclocking usually causes the PCI bus to run out of spec (faster than normal), therefore, you'll need to buy, beg, or borrow good components that will run OK when overclocked. CD-ROM drives, sound cards, modems, and other miscellaneous components should all be high quality and selected because they can handle being overclocked. The old style ISA cards should be completely avoided if possible, they will just hurt performance. In fact, choose a motherboard without ISA slots for best results.
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:54:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 1: Other things you can do to improve cooling are as simple and cheap as rerouting power wires and securing them out of the way. Additionally, round your flat data cables by wrapping them with electrical or duct tape and moving them out of the way. This trick vastly improves air circulation through the case interior and cost very little to do. RAM Memory: This is another place that you should not get cheap generic parts. Buy the best and the most you can afford. The minimum should be PC-133, preferably one 256 meg stick rather than two 128 meg modules. Mushkin, Crucial, Kingmax, and Corsair are all good brands. Lots of PC-150 memory available right now too. Choose CAS-2 rated RAM because it's faster and more overclockable than the normal CAS-3 memory. Video Card: Fortunately, most of the newer AGP 3D video cards seem quite tolerant to overclocking. I prefer the GeForce 2 video cards, especially the Hercules brand, but there are lots of other good GF2 cards on the market. Many folks swear by the Radeon cards too, but I don't have any personal experience with them. The 3dfx Voodoo cards are real decent graphics cards, but they went out of business, so future support will be non-existent; I'd probably avoid the Voodoo cards if I were you. There is a new budget video card out called Kryo II that is looking promising, but we don't know how well they'll overclock yet. Harddrives: High quality harddrives are worth there weight in gold to the overclocker. Extreme overclocking can cause data corruption and, in rare occasions, scramble your harddrive. Usually the drive is not permanently damaged and can be reformatted, but it's a huge hassle if you don't have your data backed up. Plan on spending a little extra and get a fast ATA100 harddrive that spins at 7,200 RPM - if your motherboard supports it. Maxtor has a great warranty and I've had good luck with them, but right now the overclocking king is the IBM harddrive in either the 20 gig or 30 gig flavor. Other Components: Overclocking usually causes the PCI bus to run out of spec (faster than normal), therefore, you'll need to buy, beg, or borrow good components that will run OK when overclocked. CD-ROM drives, sound cards, modems, and other miscellaneous components should all be high quality and selected because they can handle being overclocked. The old style ISA cards should be completely avoided if possible, they will just hurt performance. In fact, choose a motherboard without ISA slots for best results.
View Quote
Nice info, you the Man!! Jeff
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:55:48 PM EDT
Basic Overclocking Procedures If you have built a computer following these basics, then the actual overclocking part will be quite easy. Make sure you have good cooling and watch your CPU load temps like a hawk. The better motherboards will have temperature monitoring capabilities. After each step of the overclocking process, thoroughly test your computer system for stability. I use the following programs: SiSoft Sandra, Prime95, 3DMark2000, and the Unreal game demo loop. Monitoring temps and testing for stability is critical during all phases of overclocking. First, make sure the computer runs OK at the default settings. Your objective is to find the highest, stable CPU speed. So for: INTEL CPUs: Increase the front side bus (FSB) speed a little at a time, then test for stability. Intel's CPU multiplier can not be changed, so increasing bus speed is the only way to overclock. Repeat until it becomes unstable. AMD CPUs: Increase the front side bus (FSB) speed a little at a time. AMD's CPUs can be altered so that changing the CPU Multiplier is possible (see Beginner's Guides for details). Note that you may have to decrease the multiplier if the CPU becomes unstable. Test for stability. Repeat until it becomes unstable. For best performance, you want to find the highest FSB and CPU speed that will run your system without any problems. If the computer won't boot, crashes, freezes up, pops up error messages or gives you the dreaded Blue Screen Of Death (BSOD), then it's unstable. Raise the voltage one notch at a time until it becomes stable again (check CPU load temps each time). For safety's sake, don't raise the CPU core voltage anymore than 10% to15% above default. Congratulations! You have now completed Overclocking Basic Training and you're on the way to becoming a seasoned veteran. Bryan Bain (batboy) Then go [url=http://forum.oc-forums.com/vb/index.php?s=107de71e30dd3721128de77cfb63a66e] here[/url]. [i] -------------------------------------------------- 1. Heat is the enemy! 2. The number one cause of computer problems is computer solutions 3. Heat is the enemy! 4. When computing, whatever happens, behave as if you meant that to happen. 5. Heat is the enemy! 6. A computer program will always do what you tell it to do, but rarely what you want it to do. 7. Heat is the enemy! 8. A complex computer system that doesn't work is invariably found to have evolved from a simpler system that worked just fine. 9. Heat is the enemy! [/i]
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 4:56:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Philadelphia_GunMan: Basically [overclocking] is "hotrodding" your pc's processor to run faster by changing some settings.
View Quote
Naw, overclocking's just putting on nice rallye stripes and pretty wheels ;) "Hotrodding" your computer is putting in 768 megs of RAM made by Siemens, two 30gig harddrives, a 32 meg AGP video card, a 64bit soundcard, surround speakers, a TV card, two CD drives (16xDVD and 8*8*16 CD-RW), a backup tapedrive, 3 fans, and a 300 Watt power supply. Add a LAN and a DSL connection :) That way, my 500 Mhz/512kb level 2 cache Pentium 3 (Katmai) leaves most machines you can buy way behind, and will still do, for at least another year. Then I'll upgrade the CPU :)
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 5:18:21 PM EDT
Oh, yeah -- [url]http://www.newegg.com/index.asp[/url] is kinda the "Eric the Ammoman" of the PC hot-rod world (s/hardware). Their prices are always great, they're boringly honest, & they sell everything from "generic" to "holly grail" cases, CPUs, etc.
Link Posted: 3/11/2002 5:20:18 PM EDT
A little tid-bit to add here. This is why overclocking is no big deal. When a CPU is produced, it is tested with others in it's class. Those that do better on the quality test get stamped at a higher speed. Simple as that. Before you flame me, notice I said "IN IT'S CLASS". There has never been any case of overclocking causing a system or CPU damage. It will act erratic long before that happens. What will cause damage is the wrong voltage. Make sure you get that right. Just keep her cool and overclocking will work up to the quality of the CPU. That being said, don't waste your time overclocking your word processor. CPU speed don't mean diddly on most computers since the bus speed and I/O (hard drive) speed are generally the major bottlenecks. Not the CPU. The technical truth is most PC's processors are never taxed. If your building a super hot graphics machine then clock'er up by all means. You have to have a very good graphics card to make this work for you. Windows won't load a damn bit faster on a hot CPU. AR15.COM won't work any faster either. You really want a kick-ass computer? Buy a motherboard that supports RAID 1 and use two 7200 RPM drives striped. Add that to your $300 graphics card. The sucker will go supersonic.
Top Top