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Posted: 4/6/2006 3:58:38 PM EDT
There has been some discussion about how the hypocrites in mexico treat legal-American Nationals

Can anyone confirm that foreign nationals in mexico are........

are NOT ALLOWED to OWN PROPERTY
are NOT ALLOWED to PARTICIPATE IN THE POLITICAL PROCESS
are NOT ALLOWED to PARTICIPATE AS A CLERGY
are NOT ALLOWED to RECEIVE GOVERNMENT FUNDED MEDICAL CARE
are NOT ALLOWED to RECEIVE GOVERNMENT FUNDED WELFARE PAYMENTS
ARE JAILED IF FOUND TO BE ILLEGAL-AMERICANS


YET THEIR GOVERNMENT NOT ONLY SENDS THEIR PEOPLE HERE IT DEMANDS "RIGHTS" AND "FAIR TREATMENT" FOR THEM

MUCH BETTER TREATMENT THAN AMERICANS RECEIVE IN MEXICO APPARENTLY


MILITARIZE THE DAMN BORDER ALREADY
STOP ALL WELFARE PAYMENTS TO ILLEGALS
NO CITIZENSHIP FOR CHILDREN OF ILLEGALS
STOP SPITTING ON OUR COUNTRY AND OUR CONSTITUTION
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 4:10:17 PM EDT
Yes, they are allowed to own property in Mexico, I've read.

Here in Nashville, a former attorney is in jail for murdering his 1st wife. After living in Mexico for several years he was extradicted (sp?) back to TN.

During the hearings, it turns out he had bilked several American retirees out of tens of thousands of $$$ by fraud. Many were quoted as sying they had to sell their homes in Mexico in order to recoup some funds just to live on.

Yes, this is third or fourth hand info on the internet. No, I have no way of knowing if their property was owned by a Mexican spouse or whomever.

As for clergy, I seriously doubt the Mexican govt would really know or care where a priest was from.

As for the rest, I have no clue.

My .o2
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 4:10:43 PM EDT
Here is something about how they treat their ILLEGALS

How does Mexico treat its illegals?
Apr 6, 2006
Larry Elder
www.townhall.com/opinion/columns/larryelder/2006/04/06/192651.html
Email to a friend Print this page Text size: A A "We can't infringe upon the right of people to move freely within our territory," said Mexican President Vicente Fox during President George W. Bush's recent visit. Earlier, Fox said he stood by the statement he previously made to the BBC: "I dare say that in 10 years, the U.S. will be begging, will be pleading with Mexico to send it workers."
Does Mexico practice what it preaches?

First, Mexico put its military and police forces on its porous, zigzagged, mountainous, crime-ridden southern border with Guatemala. Chiapas -- the South Carolina-sized southern Mexican state that shares the longest border with Guatemala -- is Mexico's poorest, most illiterate state. About Chiapas, one United Nations human rights commissioner said, "Mexico is one of the countries where illegal immigrants are highly vulnerable to human rights violations and become victims of degrading sexual exploitation and slavery-like practices, and are denied access to education and health care."

Typically, when Mexican authorities catch illegal aliens, they place them overnight in a detention center, then bus or fly them back to their country of origin. Despite the fact that Mexico militarized its border and deported 203,128 illegal immigrants in 2004, many illegals get through by bribing corrupt military and police.


Do Mexicans appreciate the way America has allowed so many poor, Mexican illegals to enter the United States? No. According to a recent Zogby poll, 73 percent of Mexicans call Americans "racist"! When asked whether the United States' wealth comes from freedom and "plenty of opportunity to work," 70 percent of Americans agreed, while only 22 percent of Mexicans agreed. Sixty-two percent of Mexicans said America became wealthy because "it exploits others' wealth."

While Americans, according to the poll, see Mexicans as hard-working (78 percent), Mexicans think of Americans as racist, intolerant and not very hard-working.

Racist?

Mexico should look in the mirror. According to the Houston Chronicle's Rachel Graves, around the turn of the 17th century, Mexico imported more African slaves than anywhere else in the New World. As a result, tens of thousands of blacks (no one knows for sure -- the Mexican census does not recognize them) live in Mexico, mostly in destitute villages in its poorest states. An estimated 30,000 to 40,000 blacks live in Costa Chica.

How do they fare? According to the Houston Chronicle, many are illiterate, struggling to get a decent education for their children from government schools. One Costa Chica missionary says, "The kids here are considered by their teachers to be largely unteachable." When stopped by the police, Mexican blacks are often instructed to sing the Mexican national anthem to prove their citizenship!

If so many Mexicans consider Americans racist, why do polls show that nearly half of Mexico's inhabitants say that their lives would improve if they could work here illegally?

Intolerant?

America legally accepts about one million immigrants per year, with perhaps as many as 12 million people living here illegally, about half of whom come from Mexico. Many estimate that 500,000 or more people enter the country illegally every year. California Lieutenant Governor Cruz Bustamante is Hispanic. So is the man who holds the powerful position of speaker of the California Assembly. Los Angeles, America's second-largest city, has a Hispanic mayor, and of the 54 members of California's congressional delegation, nine are Hispanic. The former governor of California once proposed granting driver's licenses to illegals. And in California, under some circumstances, an illegal alien can apply for the cheaper in-state college tuition. Many predict the Hispanic governor of New Mexico, Bill Richardson, former Clinton Cabinet member, will run for president.

Not very hard-working?

According to the International Labor Organization, Americans work more than almost anybody in the developed world, including Japan. The average American worked 1,824 hours in 2004, compared with the Spanish at 1,799 and the French at 1,441 hours. The Dutch put in even less -- working 25 percent fewer hours than Americans.

President Bush, against the wishes of many in his own party as well of half of all Americans, makes the reasonable case for a guest worker program that would allow or provide some sort of legal status for those living here illegally. Latino "activists" do that cause harm by staging protests and waving the Mexican flag and demanding their "rights." For example, Juan Jose Gutierrez of Latino Movement USA says, "We think that the right thing to do is to grant full rights, full equality, under the laws in the Constitution of the United States, to all immigrants, period."

Americans raise legitimate concerns about the competition illegals pose to unskilled labor, and that illegals cut in front of people already waiting in line to get in the country legally. Americans resent expenditures for illegals on education and health care, and problems posed by some who commit additional crime in America. Illegals' attitude of entitlement helps to explain the growing anger Americans feel toward illegal aliens. Students leaving high schools, waving Mexican flags and chanting "Si se puede" do President Bush -- and their "cause" -- no favor.

[Editor's Note: See also "Mexico's Glass House," just released by the Center for Security Policy (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader).]

Larry Elder is an accomplished attorney, radio personality, syndicated columnist, best-selling author and host of daytime television's The Larry Elder Show
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 4:12:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:
Yes, they are allowed to own property in Mexico, I've read.

Here in Nashville, a former attorney is in jail for murdering his 1st wife. After living in Mexico for several years he was extradicted (sp?) back to TN.

During the hearings, it turns out he had bilked several American retirees out of tens of thousands of $$$ by fraud. Many were quoted as sying they had to sell their homes in Mexico in order to recoup some funds just to live on.

Yes, this is third or fourth hand info on the internet. No, I have no way of knowing if their property was owned by a Mexican spouse or whomever.

As for clergy, I seriously doubt the Mexican govt would really know or care where a priest was from.

As for the rest, I have no clue.

My .o2



These are some of the things that the radio HOSTS are saying
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 6:34:39 AM EDT
I've never been to Mexicao and I don't want to go there. Why would I pay to visit the Turd World country that illegals come from? The water is diseased.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 6:44:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 6:46:31 AM EDT by MTUSA]
You can own property in mexico. (deliberate non- caps)
What the Govt allows you to purchase.
You can not buy waterfront property.
You also must verify (a bank statement will do)
that you have required amount of cash. No parasites on the dole.
We need to mirror the mexican's stance on immigration.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 6:53:42 AM EDT
I'd sell Mexico and live in Hell. They can have their "immigrants" back, too. Fuck 'em all. I'm sick of hearing about them, and I'm sick of seeing them. If they're not here to become Americans, and be productive members of our communities, then they can all fuck off.

Thank you. I'll be here all week.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:50:14 AM EDT
Guide to buying property in Mexico


CAN FOREIGNERS REALLY OWN PROPERTY IN MEXICO?
Yes, Americans and other foreigners may obtain direct ownership of property in the interior of Mexico. However, under Mexican law, foreigners cannot own property outright within the restricted zone. Instead, a real estate trust must be set up to hold title for the foreigner. Since foreigners are not able to enter into contracts in buy real estate, they must have a bank act on their behalf, much as a trust is use to hold property for minors because they also can not contract. The following is a brief outline of the law regarding such trust, known as "fideicomisos", but potential buyers should always get advice and have all real estate transactions overview by a licensed Mexican attorney.

WHO'S INVOLVED IN REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS IN MEXICO?
Normally, there are three to four players involved in any real estate transaction in the restricted zone:

A real estate company
The buyer's lawyer
A bank
A public notary
All four are helpful in their respective areas in assisting with real estate transactions. Transactions outside of the restricted zone do not involve a bank since it is not necessary to establish a real estate trust in those areas. Otherwise the transactions are much the same.

Because of the similarities of real estate transactions in general, it is easy to assume that the basic terms and principles which are familiar in the United States also hold true in Mexico. This assumption becomes easier to make when United States real estate terminology is adopted for transactions in Mexico. Much of the paperwork is similar, if not exactly the same, as that used in the US. Although, there are many aspects of Mexican real estate transactions that are identical to procedures carried out in the United States, there are many aspects that are completely different. As a rule, a foreigner should assume nothing.

Mexican real estate transactions are not carried out in the same manner as United States real estate transactions. The buyer must retain professionals to assist in the transaction. Mexico has yet to regulate real estate transactions. Real estate agents and brokers are not legally licensed in Mexico. Consequently, a foreign buyer cannot always depend on the normal safeguards that would be applied to real estate transactions in the United States. The old saying "let the buyer beware" is very appropriate. Anyone can set up a real estate company in Mexico. There are no special requirements or brokerage licenses to obtain. A would-be real estate agent merely has to establish a Mexican corporation, obtain a work visa, and he is in business.

There are good reasons why the real estate industry in the United States is highly regulated. Until the real estate industry is regulated in Mexico, there will always be some real estate companies who prefer that buyers know as little as possible about real estate transactions. After all, a buyer cannot ask questions if he does not have any knowledge of the laws.

Currently there is nothing similar to a Real Estate Commissioner or a Department of Real Estate in Mexico. Some states are beginning to look at some kind of real estate legislation, but it might be some time before this is a reality. The American Embassy and the American consulates in Mexico are good places to start when trying to determine if a real estate company is reputable. Some of the real estate companies have established quite a reputation for themselves at some of the Consulates.

A Mexican attorney should be involved to draw up contracts and to review the conditions and terms of sale. Additionally, an attorney can do a title search and point out any problems or alternatives a buyer may have. The buyer should always have his or her own attorney rather than using the attorney of the seller or some attorney used by a real estate company free of charge. As the old saying goes, you get what you pay for, and usually if someone's services are offered free of charge you are probably paying for them in some other way. Legally, only a licensed Mexican attorney should provide advice on the law. If an attorney is licensed in Mexico he should be able to produce a "cédula profesional." This document is a registered license to practice law in Mexico and includes a photo of the attorney and his signature. To be sure that an attorney is licensed in Mexico, a foreign buyer should ask to see the attorney's license, or have the attorney's license number included in a retainer agreement before employing any services.

American attorneys are not licensed to practice law in Mexico and should not give advice on Mexican Law. I should clarify, here, that I am referring to individuals who are licensed to practice law in the United States, and not merely individuals who are citizens of that country. There are currently very few Americans who are licensed to practice law in Mexico. The fact that a person is licensed to practice law in the United States in no way allows him or her to practice law in Mexico: Mexican or United States law.

Besides formalizing your real estate transaction, an attorney can be very helpful in saving you money. This is because attorneys are involved in many different transactions and have contacts with banks, notaries, and the Mexican government on a regular basis. Because of this they are aware of the most competitive cost and fees involved in a transaction and can make sure that the buyer is given the best possible prices. An attorney can also inform the buyer regarding his or her legal options and by doing so can make sure that no opportunities are missed: tax planning considerations, closing costs which should be paid by the seller, and ways of taking title to the trust rights which make sense for the particular circumstances of a specific buyer. Very often one piece of good advice can save the buyer thousands of dollars in tax savings or other savings when the buyer eventually sells the property.

When looking for an attorney it is important to remember that any Mexican attorney can normally handle a real estate transaction. The buyer is not limited to only the local attorneys where the property is located. All real estate transactions involving a trust are governed by federal law. This means that all such transactions are carried out the same way regardless if the property is in Cancun or Los Cabos.

THE RESTRICTED ZONE AND "FIDEICOMISOS"
The law declares that the Mexican nation has original ownership to all land and water in Mexico, as well as minerals, salts, ore deposits, natural gas and oil; but that such ownership may be assigned to individuals.

The Mexican Constitution prohibits direct ownership of real estate by foreigners in what has come to be known as the "restricted zone." The restricted zone encompasses all land located within 100 kilometers (about 62 miles) of any Mexican border, and within 50 kilometers (about 31 miles) of any Mexican coastline. However, in order to permit foreign investment in these areas, the Mexican government created the "fideicomiso," (FEE-DAY-E-CO-ME-SO) which is, roughly translated, a real estate trust. Essentially, this type of trust is similar to trusts set up in the United States, but a Mexican bank must be designated as the trustee and, as such, has title to the property and is the owner of record. The Mexican Government created the "fideicomiso" to reconcile the problems involved in developing the restricted zone and to attract foreign capital. This enabled foreigners, as beneficiaries of the trusts, to enjoy unrestricted use of land located in the restricted zone without violating the law.

A "fideicomiso" is a trust agreement created for the benefit of a foreign buyer, executed between a Mexican bank and the seller of property in the restricted zone. Foreign buyers cannot own real estate in the restricted zone due to Constitutional restrictions. The bank acts on behalf of the foreign buyer, taking title to real property. The bank, as trustee, buys the property for the foreigner, then has a fiduciary obligation to follow instructions given by the foreigner who is the trust beneficiary. The trust beneficiary retains and enjoys all the rights of ownership while the bank holds title to the property. The foreigner is entitled to use, enjoy, and even sell the property that is held in trust at its market value to any eligible buyer.

In order to allow foreigners to enter into the agreement contained in the Calvo Clause, Mexico requires all foreigners to apply for and obtain a permit from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs prior to contracting to acquire real estate in Mexico. This is currently done by the trustee/bank at the time a real estate trust is set-up.

Given the changes made for 1997 in the foreign investment Law, and the fact that a buyer can now apply for and obtain a trust permit in a matter of days, it is always better to secure the trust permit from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs before entering into any contract.

The bank, as trustee, must get a permit from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to establish a real estate trust and acquire rights on real property located within the restricted zone. The purpose of the trust is to allow the trust's beneficiary the use and exploitation of the property without constituting real property rights. The beneficiaries of the trust (fideicomisarios) may be:
Mexican corporations with foreign investment
Foreign individuals or legal entities
The law defines "use" and "exploitation" as the right to use or possess the property, including its fruits, products, or any revenue that results from its operation and exploitation by third parties or from the bank/trustee.

The law does not clarify how trust permits will be issued. Article 14 of the law states that the Ministry shall decide on issuing the permits "...considering the economic and social benefit, which the realization of such operations imply for the nation." The basic criteria used to determine such benefits are likely to change somewhat with the publication of the new foreign investment regulations. However, it is reasonable to anticipate that some of the unwritten rules used by the Mexican government in the area of real estate trusts will be included in the new foreign investment regulations. It is also possible that some of the confusing elements will be eliminated. It is important to understand the application of the current regulations, even if they are going to be replaced, as well as some of the unwritten policies the government has used in the past, to better understand what criteria will be used by the Ministry in the future.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs must grant any petition for a trust permit that complies with the stipulated requirements within 5 working days following the date of its presentation to the Ministry's central office in Mexico City. It must be granted in 30 days if the application is submitted to one of the Ministry's state offices. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs must confirm the registration of any property acquired by foreign-owned Mexican corporations a maximum period of 15 days following the filing of the petition. In both cases, if the maximum period passes with no action by the Ministry, the trust permit or registration are considered authorized.

There is a common misconception among foreigners investing in Mexico that once the trust expires, the beneficiary loses all rights and benefits of the sale of the property held in trust. This is not the case. On the contrary, the beneficiary has a contractual right under the trust agreement with the Mexican bank to all benefits that may result from the use or sale of that property, even though he does not hold title to the property. Under Mexican Law, the bank, as trustee, has a fiduciary obligation to respect the rights of the beneficiary.

A real estate trust is not a lease. The beneficiary can instruct the bank to sell or lease the property at any time. The beneficiary can develop and use the property to his liking and benefit, within the provisions of the law. Generally, the law allows most activities engaged in by foreigners.

Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:52:05 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:59:08 AM EDT
When I go to work at our plant down there, I have to stop at the border and get a 30 day work visa and get my passport stamped. I can't get into the parking lot much less the building without showing it to the private security guard. Before I leave, I have to pay $20 to a Mexican bank who stamps it as paid. I guess the bank gives some portion of it back to the Mexican.gov. Before I go back to the US, I have to stop and drop off my paid visa paperwork and get my passport stamped.

Mexican labor officials will fine the heck out of a company that has "illegal" workers at a facility, which is why I can't even get on the property without my visa paperwork.

If you forget to drop off your visa paperwork, or don't get your passport stamped you can get into deep doo doo. AFter your 30 days expires, they start fineing you on a per day basis. If you only go once or twice a year like me, it can pretty darn expensive, and they can and will arrest you.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:59:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:02:24 AM EDT
A good compendium of guides reference immigrants and their status in Mexico


Below is a NONpropietary documented list of some noteworthy differences between Mexico's and the USA's immigration regulatory legal schemes. Please feel free to use its contents in any altruistic way that you like. The contents of this article do not always necessarily reflect the views of those who run these bilingual Mexico directories, but the desire for prosperity in Mexico is shared by all who are involved in maintaining these directories as well as this legal analysis.
As a preface, there are probably under 100,000 U.S. born American citizens in Mexico and by some estimates as many as 20 million Mexico-born Mexicans in the USA. If the following anti-immigrant restrictions in Mexico are finally reformed so that Mexico's laws became nearly as "friendly" to foreigners as the USA's already are, would Mexico (with its consequently increasing investment and access to new ideas) still need to send so many of its people to sadly serve in menial tasks abroad? Everyone involved with maintaining these directories and this article loves and admires the Mexican people, and that is precisely why we have decided to maintain this informative list...

Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:05:10 AM EDT
The Google search terms I used were:

"foreign ownership of land in Mexico"
"immigration to Mexico"
"status of immigrants in Mexico"

Google is a great search engine (www.google.com) but Yahoo (www.yahoo.com) and Dog Pile (www.dogpile.com) are also good.


Originally Posted By 22bad:
There has been some discussion about how the hypocrites in mexico treat legal-American Nationals

Can anyone confirm that foreign nationals in mexico are........

are NOT ALLOWED to OWN PROPERTY
are NOT ALLOWED to PARTICIPATE IN THE POLITICAL PROCESS
are NOT ALLOWED to PARTICIPATE AS A CLERGY
are NOT ALLOWED to RECEIVE GOVERNMENT FUNDED MEDICAL CARE
are NOT ALLOWED to RECEIVE GOVERNMENT FUNDED WELFARE PAYMENTS
ARE JAILED IF FOUND TO BE ILLEGAL-AMERICANS


YET THEIR GOVERNMENT NOT ONLY SENDS THEIR PEOPLE HERE IT DEMANDS "RIGHTS" AND "FAIR TREATMENT" FOR THEM

MUCH BETTER TREATMENT THAN AMERICANS RECEIVE IN MEXICO APPARENTLY


MILITARIZE THE DAMN BORDER ALREADY
STOP ALL WELFARE PAYMENTS TO ILLEGALS
NO CITIZENSHIP FOR CHILDREN OF ILLEGALS
STOP SPITTING ON OUR COUNTRY AND OUR CONSTITUTION

Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:18:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 8:18:52 AM EDT by SgtWhiting]

Originally Posted By 22bad:
There has been some discussion about how the hypocrites in mexico treat legal-American Nationals

Can anyone confirm that foreign nationals in mexico are........

are NOT ALLOWED to OWN PROPERTY
are NOT ALLOWED to PARTICIPATE IN THE POLITICAL PROCESS
are NOT ALLOWED to PARTICIPATE AS A CLERGY
are NOT ALLOWED to RECEIVE GOVERNMENT FUNDED MEDICAL CARE
are NOT ALLOWED to RECEIVE GOVERNMENT FUNDED WELFARE PAYMENTS
ARE JAILED IF FOUND TO BE ILLEGAL-AMERICANS


YET THEIR GOVERNMENT NOT ONLY SENDS THEIR PEOPLE HERE IT DEMANDS "RIGHTS" AND "FAIR TREATMENT" FOR THEM

MUCH BETTER TREATMENT THAN AMERICANS RECEIVE IN MEXICO APPARENTLY


MILITARIZE THE DAMN BORDER ALREADY
STOP ALL WELFARE PAYMENTS TO ILLEGALS
NO CITIZENSHIP FOR CHILDREN OF ILLEGALS
STOP SPITTING ON OUR COUNTRY AND OUR CONSTITUTION



Build the wall
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:25:32 AM EDT
MUST speak Spanish too
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:25:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 8:29:24 AM EDT by HeVGunner]
I am currently an "illegal alien" in Mexico. I am working and I do not yet have my working papers- known as an FM3(allows you to work, or stay more than 6 months if you have your own source of income). I pay Mexican income tax - flat rate of 10%. My understanding is that after 5 years of maintaining an FM3, I may apply for Mexican FM2 which is, in effect, citizenship, although I will not have the right to vote.

The FM3 is very easy to get, although you must submit proof of address, front and profile pictures, a passport from your country of origin, fingerprints, and a $190 USD yearly fee.
Americans and other foreigners may own property in Mexico. If that property is within 100 km of the beach, or the border, it must be held in a bank trust, which means that the gov't COULD seize it at any time (generally due to illegal activity).

As far as being jailed- a lot of that comes down to attitude- the LEOs here are generally extremely polite (much better treatment/ attitude than i have gotten in Canada or the US)- generally due to the fact that they are loking for a pay off. $10-20 will generally get you out of any problem you have (DUI, bar fights, etc...) as long as you haven't committed any major violent crime, or hurt anyone.

I do not work near the border, but Mexicans in general think what is happening is reasonable. Several of my co-workers has jokingly said "The Americans took California and Texas from us- but that's ok- we're taking it back."

Many here in Mexico are living below the poverty line, even though they are working 10 hour days, 6-7 days a week. Jumping the line is seen as a viable way to have a better life, and for many, it is.

I am a Canadian, so I don't really have a dog in this fight- but if I were American, I would do something about it- vote out those polits who are responsible and are doig nothing to fix the situation....... You can't do anything about Mexico (here in Mexico), and bitching about it is stupid- why should the Mexican government do something about an issue the US gov't clearly has no problem with? Do something about it where you live and have some say.......protest, counterprotest, write letters, support canidates who share your views, volunteer for the MM or send money/support. Bitching on an internet BB isn't gonna do it for ya...
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 9:04:34 AM EDT
Mexican Constitution

Probably ought to brush up on it, since we'll be a de facto single country sooner or later.
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 7:40:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By callgood:
Mexican Constitution

Probably ought to brush up on it, since we'll be a de facto single country sooner or later.



Yup
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 7:48:01 PM EDT
I know that foreigners are not allowed to own a majority of a company in Mexico. You can invest there though.

And I know of people that have recieved "free" emergency medical care in Mexico. Just enough to stop the bleeding. Because frankly, thats all its good for.
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 9:40:46 PM EDT
I think the instant solution to our immigration woes is to institute a program that mirrors Mexican immigration policy! What is required of their aliens should be required of our aliens living here.

Then in the UN we just say. "Hey, our immigration policy is just like Mexico's. What's the problem??"
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 9:57:41 PM EDT
Come to think of it, I know an American citizen who bought a lot of property down in Mexico, including houses and an apartment building. He took out the loans denominated in Pesos.. he was having a hard time making the payments.. then the value of the Peso crashed, around 1994 I think. Suddenly those payments got a lot more affordable on his Dollar-denominated salary.



Link Posted: 4/8/2006 10:42:31 PM EDT
Cubans who land in Mexico (it happens) are returned to Fidel's workers' paradise.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 1:16:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By raven:
Cubans who land in Mexico (it happens) are returned to Fidel's workers' paradise.



"Pedro you fucking idiot! You read the compass backwards!"

Buy land in Belize. You can own it fee simple and the laws are British in origin.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 2:53:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/9/2006 2:54:08 PM EDT by 22bad]

Originally Posted By tenmikemike:
I think the instant solution to our immigration woes is to institute a program that mirrors Mexican immigration policy! What is required of their aliens should be required of our aliens living here.

Then in the UN we just say. "Hey, our immigration policy is just like Mexico's. What's the problem??"



That should be the first thing they look at doing, mexico isn't planning any amnesty anytime soon, are they?

eta:

MILITARIZE THE DAMN BORDER ALREADY
STOP ALL WELFARE PAYMENTS TO ILLEGALS
NO CITIZENSHIP FOR CHILDREN OF ILLEGALS
STOP SPITTING ON OUR COUNTRY AND CONSTITUTION
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