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Posted: 3/11/2006 10:11:18 AM EDT

Air Force introduces next generation cruise missile

by Staff Sgt. Ryan Hansen
Air Armament Center Public Affairs

3/9/2006 - EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (AFPN) -- Since the late 1970s the Department of Defense has tried and failed numerous times to give the warfighter an affordable standoff cruise missile capable of taking out the enemy's air defenses early on in a conflict.

Fast forward to 2006 and that warfighter need has finally been met by the Air Force's next generation cruise missile -- the Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile, or JASSM.

At 14 feet long and 2,250 pounds, JASSM is an autonomous, conventional munition with a standoff range of more than 200 nautical miles. It is designed to defeat heavily defended, high-priority enemy targets deep behind enemy lines.

JASSM can be released in virtually any type of weather and uses its inertial navigation and Global Positioning Systems to find its intended target and then its infrared seeker for pinpoint accuracy just before impact.

Once in the air, the stealthy cruise missile can reach high subsonic speeds at .85 mach. It is also equipped with an anti-jammer that keeps the enemy in its crosshairs regardless of their technology or capabilities.

Warfighter's operational need
For years the warfighter has emphasized the need for an affordable standoff weapon they could use to attack high-priority targets from outside the enemy's air defenses. This weapon would give both fighter and bomber aircraft the ability to strike heavily defended and high-value targets in any weather and keep them out of harms way.

The last attempt to try and provide this capability was the Tri-Service Standoff Attack Missile in 1986. But after eight years of development, the secretary of defense terminated the program because of problems with the weapon and escalating costs. However, the warfighter's need for the weapon still remained, so the Department of Defense went back to the drawing board.

"The United States desperately needed a first-day-of-the-war stealthy cruise missile that could go in and take out those threats that put our manned platforms at risk," said Gerry Freisthler, director of the Air Armament Center’s engineering and acquisition excellence directorate. "We needed something to go in and take on those double digit (Surface-to-Air Missiles) that may be able to put our aircraft and aircrews at risk, and that's how JASSM came about."

The newly christened JASSM program office was charged with not only making a high survivability standoff weapon capable of attacking various types of targets, but also one made with speed and affordability in the acquisition world. They partnered with DOD, industry and the warfighter to streamline many processes that were often timely and cumbersome before; they emphasized affordability at every juncture.

"With JASSM the most important things were (to be) on cost and on schedule," said Mr. Freisther, who led the JASSM program from 2002 to 2004. "We gave the contractor a lot of flexibility with removal of (military) standards and (specifications) and from the beginning the program office had a very close relationship with Air Combat Command."

Together this combined team set the framework for the much needed weapon and JASSM started taking baby steps on its way to the warfighter.

Testing challenges
Even though the JASSM program office had set a solid foundation for their weapon and knew what pitfalls to avoid, that didn't mean the road to handing the weapon to the warfighter would be easy or without struggles.

The weapon began engineering and manufacturing development in 1997 and entered low rate initial production just four years later in 2001. Then the next important step for JASSM came in July 2004 when it reached full rate production.

However, even as JASSM continued to hit milestones some challenges remained.

"Achieving demonstrated in-flight reliability turned out to be our biggest challenge in the transition from development to full rate production," said Col. Jim Geurts, who manages the program as the Long Range Missile Systems Group commander.

"To address these challenges, we pulled together the experts from across industry and the Department of Defense to review our plans and give us feedback to ensure we could achieve the type of reliability growth needed as we began fielding large numbers of assets in the field," Colonel Geurts said.

Their hard work paid off and the JASSM team went back to prove the weapon could deliver on its promise. During flight tests in 2005 the weapon scored nine successes in 11 tests, followed by two more successful flights in 2006.

On the heels of those successes, the weapon finished the year strong reaching initial operational capability on the B-52 Stratofortress and B-1B Lancer. More than 350 JASSMs have been delivered and are in the hands of the warfighter and ready for combat use worldwide.

"The JASSM weapon system continues to demonstrate high reliability in flight and ground testing," said Maj. Gen. Jack J. Catton Jr., director of requirements for Air Combat Command. "More and more units are gaining the capability to effectively employ the weapon system."

Future capabilities
While JASSM has proven itself, the LRMSG has plans to make it even more lethal.

The second phase of the program is to make an extended range version of the weapon. JASSM-ER will increase the standoff capability to more than 500 nautical miles. The weapon, which looks exactly the same as the original from the outside, has a new engine and can carry more fuel. It will first be integrated on the B-1B and will be ready for flight testing later this Spring.

"A JASSM-ER will have the same lethality and stealth as a JASSM, but it will deliver that knock-out punch from more than twice as far away," said Lt. Col. Stephen Davis, JASSM Block 2 Squadron commander. "In the simplest terms, this means some child's mom or dad won't have to fly their B-1 through enemy threats to strike many deeply placed targets."

But additional stand-off range isn't the only thing they are improving. The LRMSG is also adding a weapons data link that will enable key command and control elements to communicate with the weapon after it's already in flight.

"The data link will plug the weapon right into the warfighting network," said Michele Brazel, LRMSG deputy director. "They'll be able to track what each missile is doing in flight, retarget it in flight if need be, and then get a good indication of whether or not it destroyed its target."

JASSM is also scheduled to be one of the first weapons to be Universal Armament Interface compliant. UAI is a joint initiative that will allow the Air Force to incorporate new precision-guided munitions onto its aircraft without requiring major changes to each aircraft's software.

New development activity is also planned to enable JASSM to enhance its maritime engagement capability and become the air launched weapon of choice not only for highly defended fixed and relocatable land targets, but moving maritime targets as well.

And recently the Australian Defense Force selected JASSM to be its long range air-to-surface missile for their F/A-18 Hornet fleet.

As it stands right now the Air Force currently plans to buy 2,400 JASSMs and 2,500 JASSM-ERs with production extending through 2018.

(Courtesy of Air Force Materiel Command News Service)



And because I know this thread is worthless without pics:





Link Posted: 3/11/2006 6:02:54 PM EDT
Why do the pics look photoshopped?
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 12:03:07 AM EDT
The last photo are the wrong "JASSM", they were the loser's (McDonnell Douglas / Boeing) entry. I know, I worked on the AGM-158 (JASSM) missile back a few years ago during the development stages.

We (LM Aero - ADP) handed the Missile and Space an operational design, and they have to dick with it to save pennys, and the result, Navy back off from the program and the USAF threatened to cancel the program.

BTW, ever since the Navy back off from the program (Navy wants the POS SLAM-ER), logically the J (Joint) should be dropped, and the program should have been re-named as ASSM. Now won't it sond funny when the news reporter reports US have launched three ASSM against targets in (you name a hostile country). I guess, in that case, they will call it the AGM-158.

For pictures and video, go to:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/wms/findPage.do?dsp=fec&ci=11299&sc=400
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 12:10:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By leungken:
The last photo are the wrong "JASSM", they were the loser's (McDonnell Douglas / Boeing) entry. I know, I worked on the AGM-158 (JASSM) missile back a few years ago during the development stages.

We (LM Aero - ADP) handed the Missile and Space an operational design, and they have to dick with it to save pennys, and the result, Navy back off from the program and the USAF threatened to cancel the program.

BTW, ever since the Navy back off from the program (Navy wants the POS SLAM-ER), logically the J (Joint) should be dropped, and the program should have been re-named as ASSM. Now won't it sond funny when the news reporter reports US have launched three ASSM against targets in (you name a hostile country). I guess, in that case, they will call it the AGM-158.

For pictures and video, go to:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/wms/findPage.do?dsp=fec&ci=11299&sc=400



Is that the weapon they used to call J-SOW (with attached piggy jokes, of course)?
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 12:11:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By leungken:
The last photo are the wrong "JASSM", they were the loser's (McDonnell Douglas / Boeing) entry. I know, I worked on the AGM-158 (JASSM) missile back a few years ago during the development stages.

We (LM Aero - ADP) handed the Missile and Space an operational design, and they have to dick with it to save pennys, and the result, Navy back off from the program and the USAF threatened to cancel the program.

BTW, ever since the Navy back off from the program (Navy wants the POS SLAM-ER), logically the J (Joint) should be dropped, and the program should have been re-named as ASSM. Now won't it sond funny when the news reporter reports US have launched three ASSM against targets in (you name a hostile country). I guess, in that case, they will call it the AGM-158.

For pictures and video, go to:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/wms/findPage.do?dsp=fec&ci=11299&sc=400



Sorry about that, all the top pics came from the lock-mart page, the bottom one was from FAS I think, go figure they have the wrong info.
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 12:13:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By leungken:
The last photo are the wrong "JASSM", they were the loser's (McDonnell Douglas / Boeing) entry. I know, I worked on the AGM-158 (JASSM) missile back a few years ago during the development stages.

We (LM Aero - ADP) handed the Missile and Space an operational design, and they have to dick with it to save pennys, and the result, Navy back off from the program and the USAF threatened to cancel the program.

BTW, ever since the Navy back off from the program (Navy wants the POS SLAM-ER), logically the J (Joint) should be dropped, and the program should have been re-named as ASSM. Now won't it sond funny when the news reporter reports US have launched three ASSM against targets in (you name a hostile country). I guess, in that case, they will call it the AGM-158.

For pictures and video, go to:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/wms/findPage.do?dsp=fec&ci=11299&sc=400



Also isn't the slam-er nonpowered? Maybe I have my acronymese mixed up, but we do have a ~20 mile range 40K "glide" standoff weapon in development right?
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 12:15:43 AM EDT
sweet
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 11:49:38 PM EDT
No, JSOW is a navy program, Texas Instrument (now Raytneon) produiced the missile, and was used in Desert Storm. Glider, non-powered, and they did not perform well. JSOW uses either a unitary warhead or bomblet. JASSM (AGM-158) uses a unitary warhead.

SLAM and SLAM-ER are powered, it uses the Harpoon aft. section which contain a turbojet engine. The SLAM-ER was rushed to production (doing some round about way to delay operational tests) because DOD wants to replace it with JASSM. To be serious, the SLAM-ER is a joke, smaller warhead, less range, less survivable older avionics and guidance at double the price of an AGM-158. BTW, AGM-158 have already been navial qualified. The argument is, SLAM and SLAM-ER in a pinch can use against ships, and JASSM was not designed for anti-ship role.

I uesd to work for McDonnell Douglas before Lockheed Martin ADP. I asked but was turn down by MD's management to transfer to Phantom Works, so I jumped ship to LM ADP. The JASSM win is sweet victory for me and the rest of the LM team.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:00:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By leungken:
No, JSOW is a navy program, Texas Instrument (now Raytneon) produiced the missile, and was used in Desert Storm. Glider, non-powered, and they did not perform well. JSOW uses either a unitary warhead or bomblet. JASSM (AGM-158) uses a unitary warhead.

SLAM and SLAM-ER are powered, it uses the Harpoon aft. section which contain a turbojet engine. The SLAM-ER was rushed to production (doing some round about way to delay operational tests) because DOD wants to replace it with JASSM. To be serious, the SLAM-ER is a joke, smaller warhead, less range, less survivable older avionics and guidance at double the price of an AGM-158. BTW, AGM-158 have already been navial qualified. The argument is, SLAM and SLAM-ER in a pinch can use against ships, and JASSM was not designed for anti-ship role.

I uesd to work for McDonnell Douglas before Lockheed Martin ADP. I asked but was turn down by MD's management to transfer to Phantom Works, so I jumped ship to LM ADP. The JASSM win is sweet victory for me and the rest of the LM team.



Good info, thanks! I just read in the March 6th Aviation Week that the Aussies are buying JASSM as well, for use on their F-18s. Congrats on that win too.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:19:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/13/2006 12:20:56 AM EDT by Mxphreaky]

Originally Posted By Dave_A:

Originally Posted By leungken:
The last photo are the wrong "JASSM", they were the loser's (McDonnell Douglas / Boeing) entry. I know, I worked on the AGM-158 (JASSM) missile back a few years ago during the development stages.

We (LM Aero - ADP) handed the Missile and Space an operational design, and they have to dick with it to save pennys, and the result, Navy back off from the program and the USAF threatened to cancel the program.

BTW, ever since the Navy back off from the program (Navy wants the POS SLAM-ER), logically the J (Joint) should be dropped, and the program should have been re-named as ASSM. Now won't it sond funny when the news reporter reports US have launched three ASSM against targets in (you name a hostile country). I guess, in that case, they will call it the AGM-158.

For pictures and video, go to:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/wms/findPage.do?dsp=fec&ci=11299&sc=400



Is that the weapon they used to call J-SOW (with attached piggy jokes, of course)?




no the JSOW is a clusterbomb unit and doesnt have a propulsion system.

there are some vids of it floating around on the net. we watched a bunch of them in tech school. we had a static model to get hands on with.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:43:22 AM EDT
So these things will be buzzing tehran soon?
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:18:31 AM EDT

Good info, thanks! I just read in the March 6th Aviation Week that the Aussies are buying JASSM as well, for use on their F-18s. Congrats on that win too.


Guess what, the Aussie's version have software upgrade to include anti-ship role, so why is our Navy keep buying those SLAM-ER.

Thanks, we won the program back a few years ago, it is a significient breakthru because it snached cruise missile production and development from the two strongholds, Raytheon and Boeing. Before JASSM, LM never produced a single cruise missile.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 8:22:18 AM EDT
IIRC Lock-Mart is working on a pretty nifty miniature cruise missile.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 8:36:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:
IIRC Lock-Mart is working on a pretty nifty miniature cruise missile.



The Netfires LAM for the Army?
www.missilesandfirecontrol.com/our_products/firesupport/NETFIRES/product-NETFIRES.html
Or do they have another one also?
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 8:37:15 AM EDT
WHY ARE YOU YELLING?
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 8:41:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
WHY ARE YOU YELLING?




LOUD NOISES!!!
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 9:11:04 AM EDT



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:
IIRC Lock-Mart is working on a pretty nifty miniature cruise missile.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Netfires LAM for the Army?
www.missilesandfirecontrol.com/our_products/firesupport/NETFIRES/product-NETFIRES.html
Or do they have another one also?



You meant LOCAAS. Netfire is an adaption of LOCASS (Netfire LAM) with a larger airframe to extend the range and time to loiter on target.

LOCAAS can be a very potential warhead/payload carried on other deliver systems, and so far, thats all I have to say.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 10:34:23 AM EDT
Hello Iran
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 11:38:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By leungken:



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:
IIRC Lock-Mart is working on a pretty nifty miniature cruise missile.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Netfires LAM for the Army?
www.missilesandfirecontrol.com/our_products/firesupport/NETFIRES/product-NETFIRES.html
Or do they have another one also?



You meant LOCAAS. Netfire is an adaption of LOCASS (Netfire LAM) with a larger airframe to extend the range and time to loiter on target.
LOCAAS can be a very potential warhead/payload carried on other deliver systems, and so far, thats all I have to say.


Negative,

This is what I was talking about...SMACM.



Surveilling Miniature Attack Cruise Missile
SMACM is a long range, high endurance, expendable, unmanned air vehicle (UAV) that can be used in a reconnaissance role or in an armed version to attack moving or stationary targets. With a range of over 200 miles, SMACM can be launched from outside the range of enemy air defenses from the F/A-22 and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, as well as most combat aircraft. SMACM incorporates a proven turbojet engine, two-way data link, multimode warhead and an all-weather seeker. It is similar to the size of a Small Diameter Bomb, and compatible with the BRU-61A munition rack.

SMACM offers a choice of two seekers. The first, a Tri-Mode seeker, is a combination of a millimeter wave (MMW) RF radar, an imaging infrared (IIR), and a semi active laser (SAL). These three modes provide an all-weather capability, and when seeker data is fused can categorize the target. It is currently the seeker on the Joint Common Missile under contract with the US Army and US Navy.

The second seeker option has a MMW, an active LADAR, and a SAL. This combination of sensors is called a Tri-Star seeker. This seeker, when coupled with its automatic target recognition algorithms, provides a high probability combat ID of any tactical military vehicle with extremely low false alarm rates. The 3-D images give the LADAR unprecedented capability to identify targets in cluttered environments.

The seekers on SMACM have the capability to find, categorize/ID, transmit target location and provide a battlefield assessment of subsequent precision attacks. SMACM range/endurance makes it an ideal miniature expendable UAV. The armed version can also destroy the target when commanded.

link
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 11:43:06 AM EDT
attag
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 11:54:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/13/2006 11:56:03 AM EDT by vito113]
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:01:56 PM EDT
Technically the SMACM is a UAV not cruise missile. A cruise missile is an airframe built around one mission, to deliver a lethal dose of highly potent medicine.

A UAV is a multi-role airframe, and that it can be configurated to perform a suicide mission still makes it a UAV not a missile.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:15:56 PM EDT


Mass: About 1 300 kg
Length: 5.10 m
Diameter: 0.166 m
Wing span: 3 m, fins deployed
Warhead: BROACH perforating and explosive charge (You guys bought the BROACH design off us, it's rather good!)
Speed: Mach 0.8 +
Navigation: Iinertial, GPS and Terprom
Terminal guidance: infrared imagery homing head Iinertial, GPS and Terprom
Range: > 250 km
Final phase: imaging infra-red seeker automatic target recognition (ATR) and tracking high precision terminal guidance



Storm Shadow is heavier, 2800+ versus 2,250, and it is too long and not shaped to fit inside some of our airciraft. Well we both know the rest in our head.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:55:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/13/2006 12:56:40 PM EDT by COLE-CARBINE]

Originally Posted By leungken:
Technically the SMACM is a UAV not cruise missile. A cruise missile is an airframe built around one mission, to deliver a lethal dose of highly potent medicine.

A UAV is a multi-role airframe, and that it can be configurated to perform a suicide mission still makes it a UAV not a missile.



Cheater. I've always kind of thought of a cruise missile as a UAV. Besides Lock-Mart prolly' called it a cruise missile just to get the acronyn SMACM(smack 'em).
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 2:37:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:

Originally Posted By leungken:



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:
IIRC Lock-Mart is working on a pretty nifty miniature cruise missile.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Netfires LAM for the Army?
www.missilesandfirecontrol.com/our_products/firesupport/NETFIRES/product-NETFIRES.html
Or do they have another one also?



You meant LOCAAS. Netfire is an adaption of LOCASS (Netfire LAM) with a larger airframe to extend the range and time to loiter on target.
LOCAAS can be a very potential warhead/payload carried on other deliver systems, and so far, thats all I have to say.


Negative,

This is what I was talking about...SMACM.

www.missilesandfirecontrol.com/our_products/strikeweapons/SMACM/images/Photo01-420.jpg

Surveilling Miniature Attack Cruise Missile
SMACM is a long range, high endurance, expendable, unmanned air vehicle (UAV) that can be used in a reconnaissance role or in an armed version to attack moving or stationary targets. With a range of over 200 miles, SMACM can be launched from outside the range of enemy air defenses from the F/A-22 and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, as well as most combat aircraft. SMACM incorporates a proven turbojet engine, two-way data link, multimode warhead and an all-weather seeker. It is similar to the size of a Small Diameter Bomb, and compatible with the BRU-61A munition rack.

SMACM offers a choice of two seekers. The first, a Tri-Mode seeker, is a combination of a millimeter wave (MMW) RF radar, an imaging infrared (IIR), and a semi active laser (SAL). These three modes provide an all-weather capability, and when seeker data is fused can categorize the target. It is currently the seeker on the Joint Common Missile under contract with the US Army and US Navy.

The second seeker option has a MMW, an active LADAR, and a SAL. This combination of sensors is called a Tri-Star seeker. This seeker, when coupled with its automatic target recognition algorithms, provides a high probability combat ID of any tactical military vehicle with extremely low false alarm rates. The 3-D images give the LADAR unprecedented capability to identify targets in cluttered environments.

The seekers on SMACM have the capability to find, categorize/ID, transmit target location and provide a battlefield assessment of subsequent precision attacks. SMACM range/endurance makes it an ideal miniature expendable UAV. The armed version can also destroy the target when commanded.

link



Ok, so there is more than one small cruse missile. being about the same size as a SDB makes it bigger than the LAM but still...
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