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Posted: 2/21/2006 9:50:25 AM EDT
As discussed and shown here:

Battery Resurrection

Thanks,

Merlin
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:59:06 AM EDT
where's the linky
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:00:07 AM EDT
buy new ones?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:01:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Merlin:
As discussed and shown here:

Battery Resurrection

Thanks,

Merlin




Your link is "http://Battery Resurrection".



Shok
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:02:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Merlin:
As discussed and shown here:

Battery Resurrection

Thanks,

Merlin




Link Posted: 2/21/2006 3:18:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By QShok:

Originally Posted By Merlin:
As discussed and shown here:

Battery Resurrection

Thanks,

Merlin




pages.zdnet.com/iglesia2410/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/wwjd.jpg



How embarrassing!

Here you go:

Battery Resurrection... really, it works this time!
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 4:22:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 4:26:50 PM EDT by flatfender]
Google "nicad zapper" and save your money. The RC guys use them on their batteries. Popular science had a design in the 1970s.

Here's a how to (not my words):

Nicad rejuvenation
To rejuvenate any nicad battery it is important to first assess its present condition. A
battery that won't hold its charge needs to be treated differently than one with a reversed cell.
My experiments with nicads have convinced me that most batteries can be rejuvenated
to a worthwhile level of fitness - for very little effort I might add! Here are some of the steps
that can taken:

1) Blast into submission the "dentrites" responsible for rapid self-discharging. For 12 volt
batteries I use a 10,000µF capacitor charged to 70 volts. The full charge is then applied
across the battery terminals for about 5mS. This action may need to be repeated several
times. It seems to work best on a discharged battery.
2) Charge the battery by normal means, then place it on a load (approx 0.25C rate) and
measure the discharge time until the battery has reduced to about 9 or 10 volts. Work out the
ampere-hour rating and record it on the battery for future reference.
3) Charge the battery again and place it on another load (0.01C rate) until it discharges
down to about 6 volts.
4) Repeat steps 2 and 3 as often as need be until significant gains are realized.
Given that step 3 can take several days to complete one cycle, patience is a must!

Overall, a full rejuvenation would take between two and three weeks. If there are two or
more batteries, then it will obviously take longer. But once a battery has been brought back
to life, a once-a-month deep discharge (0.01C) is all it requires.

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