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Posted: 2/20/2006 10:33:54 PM EDT
I have a glock 19 and Im going to be getting fixed night sites (meps) for it. I will be paying someone to install them and I asked them about siteing it in for me and they told me that they would make sure that the sights are straight but for them to sight it in for me would be a waste of time because what works for them might not be good for me. He said to come in on a slow day that way I could take it to their range fire a few shots and see where we need to go from there. My question is at what distance should I fire the gun from (Im thinking 7 yards). Do I want to bench rest the gun (Im thinking that this would be a yes). How many rounds should I fire at one target and how many targets should I shoot at before I decide that the gun is as good as it is going to get. Thanks for your help.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 10:35:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/20/2006 10:39:00 PM EDT by Zaphod]
It's sighted in when you can hit your target.

As for range, that's an interesting question. I think I'd want to sight in for about 15 yards. Maybe someone will correct me.

A benchrest works because it removes you as a factor.

IIRC, standard practice is to fire 3-5 rounds and let the weapon cool. Don't know if that applies to handguns. When you can put a whole group within the circle you want, it's sighted in. After that, it's up to you to learn to use the weapon to put the shots where you want them.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 10:37:27 PM EDT
You will know its sighted in when you shoot it and HIT the target!



seriously!
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 10:38:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/20/2006 10:39:32 PM EDT by www-glock19-com]
considering they are probably fixed type sights the distnace you use will not matter much just set the windage and go ( most fixed sights are "zeroed" at 25yds)
if they are adjustable sight it in so it hits for you at the distance you plan on shooting it
yes use a bench and when a accpetable size group appears centered on your target you gun is zeroed
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 10:41:08 PM EDT
If you hit what your shooting at....
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 11:18:46 PM EDT
When I sight in a handgun , I always use a rest , or at least
a sandbag . Then I adjust so POA is POI @ 25 yards . This
way I know if I need to take careful aim the sights will be where
I want them . Once that is done I practice with the weapon until I can
put a full mag in an 8" circle @ 10 yards as fast I can
strictly point shooting .

Some will undoubtedly argue with point shooting . They will
say that you need to practice getting a sight picture so it
becomes a function of muscle memory . All well and good .

Me .. I figure if the time comes where I need a weapon to defend
myself . It's going to be a high stress situation inside 7 yards and I'm
going to want those extra two tenths of a second I gain by not
acquiring a bead . Plus when you rush point shooting you shoot low
not high like you do when your pushing the weapon to eye level , and
there is a whole lot more meat below COM then there is above it

Link Posted: 2/20/2006 11:44:12 PM EDT
How do you know when you're gun is sighted in?

This is better than the "can you make hamburger from ground steak" thread.

Seriously, if the answer to this question isn't completely self-evident, you shouldn't own a gun, drive, or vote.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 11:55:48 PM EDT
Well, when you can...

Wait a minute? Are you high?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 12:04:49 AM EDT
Dont really need smart comments guys. I just want to make sure that it is as good as it is going to get. I have to pay to have the gun sited in after I leave the store. My wallet is not as big as some of yours. I guess I shoudle have worded the question. "When should I be satisified that my gun is sighted in." Like being able to shoot 3 seperate 5 shot groups that all hold a 3 inch (or less) patteren at say 7 yards off of a rest.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 12:06:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By kevinR:
Dont really need smart comments guys. I just want to make sure that it is as good as it is going to get. I have to pay to have the gun sited in after I leave the store. My wallet is not as big as some of yours. I guess I shoudle have worded the question. "When should I be satisified that my gun is sighted in." Like being able to shoot 3 seperate 5 shot groups that all hold a 3 inch (or less) patteren at say 7 yards off of a rest.



Refer to earlier question regarding your sobriety.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 12:27:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 12:27:43 AM EDT by swingset]

Originally Posted By kevinR:
Like being able to shoot 3 seperate 5 shot groups that all hold a 3 inch (or less) patteren at say 7 yards off of a rest.



Not to keep on hammering your sanity, but that's just as stupid of a question. Seriously.

Sighting in has nothing to do with the grouping of the gun. The sights don't affect a gun's ability to group tighter. The gun will group the way it will group regardless of where you aim, sighting in is getting the sights to align to where the barrel puts the bullets.

If you want the gun to shoot better groups, it needs accurized, not sighted in.

Again, I'd find a new hobby, one that doesn't involve explosive projectiles. Or, at least do a smidgeon of basic research before posting.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 12:52:28 AM EDT
It would appear some folks responded without reading your post!

Anyway, you really should sight-in the firearm yourself.

How a firearm is held can influence the point of impact. And that’s an individual matter.

There also seem to be variances in how folks actually view the sights – though I really don’t know why since there’s really only one correct way to view them.

25 yards from a benchrest is how I sight a handgun in. But that’s a personal decision – there’s no one “right” answer.

Also, you will probably want to start closer just to make sure you’re getting your bullets on the target to begin with. Then make any preliminary adjustments and move the target further away till you get to 25 yards.

Incidentally, don’t let the firearm touch anything hard when you fire it from the bench since this will alter the point of impact.

For me, getting a 5 round group centered tightly on or around the point I want the bullets to strike is adequate. Keep going until you get that - and then you can stop. The actual size of that group will vary depending on the capabilities of the ammunition, firearm, and shooter.

Note that varying ammunition can change the point of impact – esp. if there’s significant differences in bullet weight or velocity. Thus you should sight in with the particular ammo you plan on using.

As has already been mentioned, you’ll actually just be able to adjust the sights for windage. The only realistic way to compensate for elevation problems with fixed nitesights is by trying different ammo.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 1:06:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 199:
It would appear some folks responded without reading your post!



I read it.....but his question shows a complete and utter lack of understanding about how a gun works. If that's the case, and he's worded the question wrong ok, my bad. But, he qualifies the original question with a second one that's just as bad.

Sights have nothing to do with how well a gun groups.

To be more helpful, I'll say this. A pistol with fixed sights can be drifted side-to-side to get close to bullseye (point of impact) when the sights are aligned on the target (point of aim). Ideally, these two points are identical. But, elevation (up and down) can vary, and even side to side can vary between shooters, between loads, and between conditions. Generally, tho, at 7 yards, you're going to be very close to bullseye if the sights are straight. That's damn close to target. At 25 yards, it makes a bigger difference, as do you.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 1:31:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 1:31:22 AM EDT by Stealth]
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the
immense shear-forces of wind and weather.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 4:57:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Stealth:
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the
immense shear-forces of wind and weather.



Classic reply Stealth!
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 5:02:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
Well, when you can...

Wait a minute? Are you high?



+1
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 3:36:55 AM EDT
25 yards, bench rest.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 4:43:16 AM EDT
I'd shoot at around 15-25 yards. You want to make sure that the group is centered on the target. The size of the group will depend on various factors - mostly your skill level, but also the type of gun and ammunition. I'd recommend making sure you can shoot a consistent group before trying to move the sights to center that group.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 4:46:24 AM EDT
Sorry, but....
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