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Posted: 2/11/2006 7:03:56 PM EDT
US Navy to develop fibre lasers
(from janes.com)
By Andrew Koch JDW Contributing Strategic Editor
Washington, DC

Within a decade the US Navy wants to develop a high-powered laser small enough to fit on a tactical combat aircraft and powerful enough to destroy fleeing ground targets, a senior service scientist said.

According to Michael Deitchman, head of the Air Warfare and Weapons Department at the Office of Naval Research, within 10 years the navy wants to develop a 100 kW fibre laser in a pod, which is able to be hung under tactical aircraft such as F-18E/F Super Hornets.

The laser, carried in a composite 1,817 litre external fuel-tank pod on the aircraft's centreline pylon, would weigh about 1,814 kg (4,000 lb) and be able to strike 20 targets in 60 seconds before needing to be recharged.

The navy and other armed services have been developing solid-state lasers (SSLs) as a future aircraft weapon, but Deitchman noted that fibre lasers offer better thermal management qualities and are less complex than solid-state devices. The army and air force continue work on scaling up the power of SSLs.
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 7:07:16 PM EDT
Star Wars is really here
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 7:30:49 PM EDT
Awesome.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:09:37 AM EDT
Parallel development to the AFs Solid State Laser.

And actually a fiber optic laser IS a form of solid state laser.

Forget the pod that F-18s and other older types would use. In the F-35 it would eliminate the need for a ball turret of some kind that the SSL the AF is working on needs

Instead a single laser power source could be switched to shoot through optical windows scattered across the airframe, and the laser light rapidly switched from one port to another. 360deg coverage could be possible.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:19:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:
US Navy to develop fibre lasers
(from janes.com)
By Andrew Koch JDW Contributing Strategic Editor
Washington, DC

Within a decade the US Navy wants to develop a high-powered laser small enough to fit on a tactical combat aircraft and powerful enough to destroy fleeing ground targets, a senior service scientist said.

According to Michael Deitchman, head of the Air Warfare and Weapons Department at the Office of Naval Research, within 10 years the navy wants to develop a 100 kW fibre laser in a pod, which is able to be hung under tactical aircraft such as F-18E/F Super Hornets.

The laser, carried in a composite 1,817 litre external fuel-tank pod on the aircraft's centreline pylon, would weigh about 1,814 kg (4,000 lb) and be able to strike 20 targets in 60 seconds before needing to be recharged.

The navy and other armed services have been developing solid-state lasers (SSLs) as a future aircraft weapon, but Deitchman noted that fibre lasers offer better thermal management qualities and are less complex than solid-state devices. The army and air force continue work on scaling up the power of SSLs.




Why only "fleeing" targets?



Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:22:42 AM EDT
Sounds cool and all,but to say it kicks more ass than a Chuck Norris POD is a bit of a stretch,no
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:22:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/12/2006 6:22:58 AM EDT by N1Rampage]

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:
US Navy to develop fibre lasers
(from janes.com)
By Andrew Koch JDW Contributing Strategic Editor
Washington, DC

Within a decade the US Navy wants to develop a high-powered laser small enough to fit on a tactical combat aircraft and powerful enough to destroy fleeing ground targets, a senior service scientist said.

According to Michael Deitchman, head of the Air Warfare and Weapons Department at the Office of Naval Research, within 10 years the navy wants to develop a 100 kW fibre laser in a pod, which is able to be hung under tactical aircraft such as F-18E/F Super Hornets.

The laser, carried in a composite 1,817 litre external fuel-tank pod on the aircraft's centreline pylon, would weigh about 1,814 kg (4,000 lb) and be able to strike 20 targets in 60 seconds before needing to be recharged.

The navy and other armed services have been developing solid-state lasers (SSLs) as a future aircraft weapon, but Deitchman noted that fibre lasers offer better thermal management qualities and are less complex than solid-state devices. The army and air force continue work on scaling up the power of SSLs.




Why only "fleeing" targets?






Enemy pilot: They had friggen' lasers! I swear! We barely made it!
Enemy commander: Horseshit, toss him in the brig!
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:23:15 AM EDT
With our lasers, UAVs, combat robots, etc., the Mexicans that will be in control of the United States by 2050 will be damn near unstoppable!
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:27:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:
US Navy to develop fibre lasers
(from janes.com)
By Andrew Koch JDW Contributing Strategic Editor
Washington, DC

Within a decade the US Navy wants to develop a high-powered laser small enough to fit on a tactical combat aircraft and powerful enough to destroy fleeing ground targets, a senior service scientist said.

According to Michael Deitchman, head of the Air Warfare and Weapons Department at the Office of Naval Research, within 10 years the navy wants to develop a 100 kW fibre laser in a pod, which is able to be hung under tactical aircraft such as F-18E/F Super Hornets.

The laser, carried in a composite 1,817 litre external fuel-tank pod on the aircraft's centreline pylon, would weigh about 1,814 kg (4,000 lb) and be able to strike 20 targets in 60 seconds before needing to be recharged.

The navy and other armed services have been developing solid-state lasers (SSLs) as a future aircraft weapon, but Deitchman noted that fibre lasers offer better thermal management qualities and are less complex than solid-state devices. The army and air force continue work on scaling up the power of SSLs.




Why only "fleeing" targets?





Who would dare to stand fast against the mighty power of a SuperHornet with a friggen LAZER beam?
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:27:50 AM EDT
Couldn't the enemy counter a laser by issuing a big mirror?
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:32:51 AM EDT


hornets with frikkin laser on their frikkin pylons!
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:42:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BigBore45:
Couldn't the enemy counter a laser by issuing a big mirror?



That depends on what spectrum the laser is opperating in, most solid state lasers, and fiber optic lasers as well (note the non limey spelling) produce beams in the mid to high infrared, so o a mirror wouldn't really do you any good.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:49:17 AM EDT
IBTV (InBeforeTheVito)
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 9:30:33 AM EDT
Enlighten me: How does a laser "kill" a target?

Wouldn't it merely punch pin-hole sized holes in things if it strikes them long enough (and isn't reflected with a mirror-like countermeasure?)

John
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 9:31:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Templar223:
Enlighten me: How does a laser "kill" a target?

Wouldn't it merely punch pin-hole sized holes in things if it strikes them long enough (and isn't reflected with a mirror-like countermeasure?)

John


Kinetic energy.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 2:32:01 PM EDT
Chris Knight: "It's like lasing a stick of dynamite!"
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:13:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dport:

Originally Posted By Templar223:
Enlighten me: How does a laser "kill" a target?

Wouldn't it merely punch pin-hole sized holes in things if it strikes them long enough (and isn't reflected with a mirror-like countermeasure?)

John


Kinetic energy.



Isnt heat energy?
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:15:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Echo_Hotel:
With our lasers, UAVs, combat robots, etc., the Mexicans that will be in control of the United States by 2050 will be damn near unstoppable!







sad but true
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:15:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:

Originally Posted By dport:

Originally Posted By Templar223:
Enlighten me: How does a laser "kill" a target?

Wouldn't it merely punch pin-hole sized holes in things if it strikes them long enough (and isn't reflected with a mirror-like countermeasure?)

John


Kinetic energy.



Isnt heat energy?


I think so.

My understanding is, at least with some lasers, the idea is the beam hits with such energy it destroys its target. Or at least that's what I read about the ABM lasers that targeted missiles during launch.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:21:16 PM EDT
I am going to assume that this new toy will be serviced by civillian contractors rather than AOs.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 5:21:29 PM EDT
oh please, oh please oh, please!

That would be awesome!
Matt
Rhino Pilot
Matt
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 7:12:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Parallel development to the AFs Solid State Laser.

Instead a single laser power source could be switched to shoot through optical windows scattered across the airframe, and the laser light rapidly switched from one port to another. 360deg coverage could be possible.



What material would these "windows" be made of?
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 7:20:01 PM EDT
lasers cause damage by either

1) dumping a lot of heat in a short time (into a soft target like, say humans) causing the underlying material to burst by rapid heat expansion.

2) by shocking a hard target by vaporizing a small amount of casing material so fast that an explosive shock is transfered to the interior.

3) blinding, I suppose also.

You can peen metal with lasers, instead of metal or plastic shot, by controlling the pulse in number 2) above.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 7:23:20 PM EDT
[vito]Seems a bit late chaps, the British airforce was on this bogey in 1878! Cheerio![/vito]
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 7:38:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AyeGuy:

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Parallel development to the AFs Solid State Laser.

Instead a single laser power source could be switched to shoot through optical windows scattered across the airframe, and the laser light rapidly switched from one port to another. 360deg coverage could be possible.



What material would these "windows" be made of?



Off hand, transparent aluminum would be the best choice IF it was transparent in the right frequency.
Failing that, silica crystal.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 7:43:54 PM EDT
At the rate that technology turns over this idea will be outdated it 2-5 yrs.

Link Posted: 2/12/2006 7:49:23 PM EDT
I don't see it being done in 10 years, but it will be done.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 8:06:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dport:

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:

Originally Posted By dport:

Originally Posted By Templar223:
Enlighten me: How does a laser "kill" a target?

Wouldn't it merely punch pin-hole sized holes in things if it strikes them long enough (and isn't reflected with a mirror-like countermeasure?)

John


Kinetic energy.



Isnt heat energy?


I think so.

My understanding is, at least with some lasers, the idea is the beam hits with such energy it destroys its target. Or at least that's what I read about the ABM lasers that targeted missiles during launch.



Kinetic energy is the correct answer, as hard as that is to believe - I didn't back in the late 80's when we were looking at laser damage to F-15 structure.

We've had hand held dazzling lasers for a while, but they might cause the enemies airplane to crash, and as far as I know they aren't deployed. They might not be too effective against two place airplanes with pilots that have their seats and visors down, and one pilot is flying on gages while the other has his head outside.
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