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Posted: 2/8/2006 5:16:31 AM EDT
I'm slowly finishing out our 1500 sq ft basement. I have drywall up in about half of it and I've finished the drywall in one large room and closet.
Drywall question #1: I've sanded what I've finished and I'm ready to prime and paint. Do I have to get all this drywall dust off the wall before I prime, and if so, how?
Drywall question #2: How do you do corners neatly? I used my corner knife for the first two coats, then used a 10" knife for the last coat, but I had to do the last coat one side of the corner at a time or I would mess up the other side that I just did.
Drywall question #3: How do I get these bubbles out of the joint compound? Will stirring it remove them or make them small enough they don't matter?

Electrical question: I'm going to do a suspended ceiling. Can I attach the electrical cords to the bottom of the joists, which will be ~6" above the ceiling? I think I read somewhere that if wiring is inside a closed ceiling, they don't have to go through the joists. This would save me a ton of drilling because I'm getting ready to put lights in.

Thanks!
Jim
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:24:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 5:29:48 AM EDT by ZitiForBreakfast]
Remove the dust from the walls: Just take a rag and whisk it off, then vacum.

I use a corner bead tool for the corners, worth every penny of the 8.00 I paid.

If the bubbles are in the container...then just drop it a few times to let them rise. If the bubbles are in the area on the wall you are working on..then 'fold' the compound in the trough you are using with the knife you are using. If the bubbles are on the wall, it's ok. Let it dry, light sand then fill them in with topping compound.

I just got done doing my basement and I am ready to paint this weekend, 1200 sq.ft.

Go slow, use a fair amount of mud, but not too much. I use a 10" knife to feather the outside corners and the seams.

Here in Michigan (at least my city), the ceiling counts and you do not have to run the wiring through the joists. I am have ran and re ran everything through the joists. I think I am going to spray paint the ceiling black, hang can lights then put white vinyl lattace up at an angle for the ceiling.


Good luck.

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:29:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 5:38:48 AM EDT by fireguy]

Originally Posted By JimTh:
Drywall question #1: I've sanded what I've finished and I'm ready to prime and paint. Do I have to get all this drywall dust off the wall before I prime, and if so, how? Not a really big deal if you don't. If you're rolling the paint it shouldn't be a problem. Otherwise take a clean, soft dust mop and lightly go over the walls being careful not to scratch the finished mud.

Drywall question #2: How do you do corners neatly? I used my corner knife for the first two coats, then used a 10" knife for the last coat, but I had to do the last coat one side of the corner at a time or I would mess up the other side that I just did. For inside corners - Corner knives are a joke. A 5" or 6" knife is what you should be using for all three coats. One side at a time is correct, it takes longer but you get a better job.

Drywall question #3: How do I get these bubbles out of the joint compound? Will stirring it remove them or make them small enough they don't matter? Use a mixing wand attached to a drill and mix thoroughly, careful not to get airbubbles in the compound while mixing. Sometimes a little water will help thin the mixture for tape coat.

Electrical question: I'm going to do a suspended ceiling. Can I attach the electrical cords to the bottom of the joists, which will be ~6" above the ceiling? I think I read somewhere that if wiring is inside a closed ceiling, they don't have to go through the joists. This would save me a ton of drilling because I'm getting ready to put lights in.
No idea
Thanks!
Jim



ETA - Question #2 I assumed you were talking about inside corners. For outside corners start with a 8" knife for the first coat and finish with a 10" knife. If you need 3 coats use the 8" for the first two coats and finish with a 10" You should be able to do both sides at once with a little practice. Remember it is easier to use less mud on each coat than slopping on a shitload all at once and trying to sand it all off each time.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:30:08 AM EDT
Hey...I am looking at doing mine too. Can I put drywall right on 1x2 furring strips on the concrete outer walls? What do I need to do to make sure I don't get moisture buildup or mold?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:35:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 5:35:59 AM EDT by ZitiForBreakfast]
If your walls are straight the firring strips should be 'ok'. You'll need plastic and insulation..Dont forget about the wiring for elec and network and cable. It is just as easy to frame the walls then you got all the options you want. You can also frame around the water and gas meter and leave easy access to those.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:37:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ZitiForBreakfast:
If your walls are straight the firring strips should be 'ok'. You'll need plastic and insulation..Dont forget about the wiring for elec and network and cable. It is just as easy to frame the walls then you got all the options you want. You can also frame around the water and gas meter and leave easy access to those.



OK, so does the plastic go under the furring strips? Or do I put up the furring strips, then fiberglass insulation, then plastic, then drywall?

I can frame out walls, no sweat. Just wondering how to deal with the conrete walls and mmoisture the best way.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:40:58 AM EDT

I put up the furring strips, then fiberglass insulation, then plastic, then drywall?


This is correct
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:41:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 5:45:24 AM EDT by ZitiForBreakfast]

Originally Posted By TheKill:

Originally Posted By ZitiForBreakfast:
If your walls are straight the firring strips should be 'ok'. You'll need plastic and insulation..Dont forget about the wiring for elec and network and cable. It is just as easy to frame the walls then you got all the options you want. You can also frame around the water and gas meter and leave easy access to those.



OK, so does the plastic go under the furring strips? Or do I put up the furring strips, then fiberglass insulation, then plastic, then drywall?

I can frame out walls, no sweat. Just wondering how to deal with the conrete walls and mmoisture the best way.



The plastic goes on 1st, the strips (if thats the way you go) will hold the plastic in place. If the wood goes on 1st it will carry the moisture through the nails and screw holes (possibly) then into the drywall.

When I framed my walls, I used wolmenized 2x4's on the floor, then regular studs for the walls. I shimmed the walls plumb with the floor joists, then I used my framming nailer to hold them in place on the joists then I power drove them into the floor with a good load and a trigger actuated gun. I used styrofoam insulation over the plastic that is made to fit in between the 16" on center 2x4's.

I have a deck over 2 basement windows. I used the expansion foam to seal off any drafts then used insulation to cover them and then I framed right over them.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:42:38 AM EDT

Unless code in your county says otherwise, stapling the wire to the bottom of the joist should do just fine.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:43:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheKill:
Hey...I am looking at doing mine too. Can I put drywall right on 1x2 furring strips on the concrete outer walls? What do I need to do to make sure I don't get moisture buildup or mold?



1" x 2" furring strips will work but leaves no room for insulation, go with 2" x 2" at minimum. 2"x4" are better.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:45:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheKill:
Hey...I am looking at doing mine too. Can I put drywall right on 1x2 furring strips on the concrete outer walls? What do I need to do to make sure I don't get moisture buildup or mold?



Have you looked at metal framing? I have 10" thick poured walls and they were not plumb. IIRC I used 5/8" metal studs to build a "wall" next to the concrete walls so I had a plumb surface to hang the sheet rock. I lost very little room space and still had room to run wires.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:46:41 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:48:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ZitiForBreakfast:

The plastic goes on 1st, the strips (if thats the way you go) will hold the plastic in place. If the wood goes on 1st it will carry the moisture through the nails and screw holes (possibly) then into the drywall.




I've never seen or heard of this being done. Not saying you're wrong but I've always seen the plastic go over the studs directly underneath the drywall. Just my observation.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:55:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 5:55:48 AM EDT by ZitiForBreakfast]

Originally Posted By fireguy:

Originally Posted By ZitiForBreakfast:

The plastic goes on 1st, the strips (if thats the way you go) will hold the plastic in place. If the wood goes on 1st it will carry the moisture through the nails and screw holes (possibly) then into the drywall.




I've never seen or heard of this being done. Not saying you're wrong but I've always seen the plastic go over the studs directly underneath the drywall. Just my observation.



You could, sure, put the plastic on last, but that is not keeping the moisture from the pourous concrete off the wood and insulation. I have seen it done both ways as well. I have seen people use black tar paper on the concrete, thne the strips, then use plastic as well.

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:57:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheKill:

OK, so does the plastic go under the furring strips? Or do I put up the furring strips, then fiberglass insulation, then plastic, then drywall?

I can frame out walls, no sweat. Just wondering how to deal with the conrete walls and mmoisture the best way.


{caveat-I'm a DIY guy,not a contractor}
I'm in the planning stages for finishing my basement. I've heard that using plastic vapor barrier can sometimes lead to condensation build up and mold depending on the source of any water,so I'm thinking about sealing the inside concrete walls with something like UGL Drylock in lieu of a plastic or aluminum vapor barrier.
Plastic between the insulation and drywall can lead to mold problems,since it can trap any water that comes in from the outside.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:00:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 6:01:16 AM EDT by ZitiForBreakfast]

Originally Posted By Poodleshooter:

Originally Posted By TheKill:

OK, so does the plastic go under the furring strips? Or do I put up the furring strips, then fiberglass insulation, then plastic, then drywall?

I can frame out walls, no sweat. Just wondering how to deal with the conrete walls and mmoisture the best way.


{caveat-I'm a DIY guy,not a contractor}
I'm in the planning stages for finishing my basement. I've heard that using plastic vapor barrier can sometimes lead to condensation build up and mold depending on the source of any water,so I'm thinking about sealing the inside concrete walls with something like UGL Drylock in lieu of a plastic or aluminum vapor barrier.
Plastic between the insulation and drywall can lead to mold problems,since it can trap any water that comes in from the outside.



Yup.

Drylock is good. I used that on the wall (the oil based one ) where I cut a 50"x52" egress window out of the foundation. I used a 4" steel I-Beam for a header in lieu of the brick plate. Had to cut a notch out of each end so the header is on the foundation and the brick above will not sag or morter to crack.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:35:42 AM EDT
#1: Old t-shirt and wipe down. Cover with primer. No big deal.

#2: I hired a guy.

#3: The guy that finished mine used a big paint stirrer thing in the end of a drill and added a little bit of water to the 5 gallon bucket. He said that's why he was doing it.
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