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Posted: 2/3/2006 6:01:37 AM EDT
What are the points of contact. I know what the fourth point is. What are the others?
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:10:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2006 6:37:50 AM EDT by EdAvilaSr]
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:14:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:17:15 AM EDT
Thanks for the swift replies. I figured it was somthing along that line of the body.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:29:21 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:37:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2006 6:45:23 AM EDT by EdAvilaSr]
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:43:18 AM EDT
Heck. Even I know what a PLF is ... and I'm a leg!
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:45:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
Roger. Paratrooper posers are the easiest to bust in person.

Everyone who's been on jump status has been through prejump prior to rigging up. And part of that prejump is doing the required 4 PLFs. Who could ever forget the Jumpmaster standing there, saying over and over, "Prepare to land...land...prepare to land...land...prepare to land...land..."?

Something as simple as "PLF" - good call.



Does the 82nd still use canopy lights for night jumps or have they phased those out yet?
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:48:56 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:52:33 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:54:26 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:56:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:57:21 AM EDT
I pity you poor bastards who have to jump round unsteerable canopies and PLF. With my recreational canopy, most landings were like stepping off a very fast escalator. We were taught how to PLF during ground school, but I never really had a landing where I needed to.

Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:58:06 AM EDT
I had to jump off my roof the other day (ladder fell) and did a perfect PLF (IMHO).
Not bad since my last jump was 1988.

My wife looked at me like an idiot.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:59:36 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 7:01:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 7:05:45 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 7:08:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 8:58:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By xinflt:
Heck. Even I know what a PLF is ... and I'm a leg!



I know what a PLF is and I've never served. I just paid some crazies to drop me out of an airplane on my own time.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 9:16:04 AM EDT
Don't know if the American PLF is used world-wide or not. When I got my Dutch wings, it was feet at a 45 degree off-center (But together), knees slightly bent, tuck head between arms, then in impact, feet, ankle, side of calf/knee, side of thigh, side of torso, then a half-roll onto the back swinging the legs up and over, with final impact of the side of the other leg.

NTM
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 9:46:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 9:51:57 AM EDT
I always enjoyed jumping with a fine coat of riser grease and some canopy lights for our jumps.

Sua Sponte,
Prib
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 9:56:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2006 9:56:53 AM EDT by rgrprib]
All we had were the MC1-1B chutes at 2nd Batt. You could get going pretty fast if you ran with the wind with one of those. I only had one tree landing at Lewis (I'd recommend not do it)
Never had to jump a T-10 after jump school.

Sua Sponte,
Prib
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 10:02:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
Balls of the feet
Calves
Thighs
Buttocks
Pushup muscles

Or

Feet
Ass
Head



That's pull-up muscle. If your last point of contact is your push-up muscle (chest) you would likely break your nose.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 10:03:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
Feet
Ass
Head



These are the only three I know of


Or there is ..

Ruck
Feet
Ass
Head
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 10:14:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2006 10:14:18 AM EDT by No_Serfing]
In Colorado at 7000ft, it's feet, knees, face.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 10:27:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By EdAvilaSr:

Originally Posted By xinflt:
What are the points of contact. I know what the fourth point is. hat

If I recall correctly (after almost 30 40 yrs)
-Ball of foot
-heel
-calf
-Upper thigh/butt
-side of thorax (latissimus dorsi muscles)

h.gif

ETA:It will be 40,not 30 yrs in june 2006!



What he said..
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 10:41:12 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 10:48:23 AM EDT
Just graduated Jump Master School a few months ago and it is your pushup muscle, (latisimus dorsai (SP?)

5 more jumps for the Star

Link Posted: 2/3/2006 11:29:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pliftkl:
I pity you poor bastards who have to jump round unsteerable canopies and PLF. With my recreational canopy, most landings were like stepping off a very fast escalator. We were taught how to PLF during ground school, but I never really had a landing where I needed to.




It doesn’t matter how many sky dives you've got, until you've stepped out of an airplane in total darkness at twelve hundred and fifty feet wearing ninety-five pounds of equipment and forty-two pounds of parachute, you are still a leg. Period.

Link Posted: 2/3/2006 11:37:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pliftkl:
I pity you poor bastards who have to jump round unsteerable canopies and PLF. With my recreational canopy, most landings were like stepping off a very fast escalator. We were taught how to PLF during ground school, but I never really had a landing where I needed to.




Even if there was no need to, in the military, a "standing landing" was strictly verboten (at least in non SF
type units).

Rumor had it, that it was an article 15 offense. Of course I never did it.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 11:45:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:

Originally Posted By Wirebrush:

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
Balls of the feet
Calves
Thighs
Buttocks
Pushup muscles

Or

Feet
Ass
Head



That's pull-up muscle. If your last point of contact is your push-up muscle (chest) you would likely break your nose.



I'm not entirely sure if you're joking or not but it's definitely "pushup muscle" (i.e. latissimus dorsi).




The lats are 'pulling' muscles - for wide / close grip pulldowns, pullups, etc. The pecs are the muscles generally used for pushups (if you're talking about standard pushups and not some airborne term I've never heard.)

pushups: pecs / triceps
pullups: lats / biceps
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 11:54:11 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 11:59:53 AM EDT
When I left in 2001, there were some new mock doors built down at Green ramp right next to the new indoor rigging area. That was a lot better than rigging up on the side of that little hill next to the tarmac itself.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 12:00:07 PM EDT
One of the guys from my section at Bragg almost got an article 15 for doing a standing landing in front of the BN CMDR. Man was that funny.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 12:06:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 12:19:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:

Originally Posted By bastiat:
The lats are 'pulling' muscles - for wide / close grip pulldowns, pullups, etc. The pecs are the muscles generally used for pushups (if you're talking about standard pushups and not some airborne term I've never heard.)

pushups: pecs / triceps
pullups: lats / biceps



You should notify the US Army School of Infantry, Basic Airborne Course and set them straight.




maybe they can just get some physiology textbooks instead?


Link Posted: 2/3/2006 12:45:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 3:36:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By EdAvilaSr:

That's pretty close to what I remember....except for the 45 degree off center for the feet.The leg swinging.we were taught also.



The idea for the feet at an angle was to help the body naturally fall to one side or the other. Whatever way we were going when we hit, forwards or backwards, we obviously didn't have much say in the issue, the motion would result in falling to a particular side. For example, if the feet were twisted to the right, and we were moving forward, we would always land on the left side of our legs/torso. If going backwards, we'd always land on the right side.

NTM
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 3:47:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By xinflt:
Heck. Even I know what a PLF is ... and I'm a leg!


not trying to be a dick here, but your sig line says " B co, 2/187, 193rd inf bde, Panama".
what year? I was in A co. in 86 and 87, and the whole battalion was Airborne.
Do you remember 1Sgt Lamika?
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 3:52:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2006 3:53:09 PM EDT by vito113]
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:00:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vito113:
Someone remind me again,

What are the two things that fall out of the sky?


ANdy




Paratroopers and bombs ?



by Manic_Moran
Don't know if the American PLF is used world-wide or not. When I got my Dutch wings, it was feet at a 45 degree off-center (But together), knees slightly bent, tuck head between arms, then in impact, feet, ankle, side of calf/knee, side of thigh, side of torso, then a half-roll onto the back swinging the legs up and over, with final impact of the side of the other leg.



That sounds similar to what I learned in Denmark (civie parachute training while I was in the military), but the local translation was "rolling fall"

Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:07:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vito113:
Someone remind me again,

What are the two things that fall out of the sky?


ANdy



We do not fall out of the sky, We JUMP THROUGH IT Only a leg will fall.

As to the 45 degree deal, remember "Think Banana"

Ed, The dummy ships (wooden jump platform) were at the end of green ramp area. And it was a bitch going up and down that damn hill. Almost as bad as landing on the helipad (the steel perf plates they dropped near the bleachers) when your trying to hit the target they had out there. (also jumped with the green beanie club) And please never get dyslexic and do a PFL instead of a PLF..... My favorite command.......STAND..IN THE DOOR
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:09:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2006 4:09:41 PM EDT by rgrprib]
<Someone remind me again,

What are the two things that fall out of the sky?


ANdy>

If you must know: The occasional Rucks that detatch from lowering lines and helicopters with engine failure.

Sua Sponte,
Prib
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:12:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:14:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ODA_564:

Originally Posted By pliftkl:
I pity you poor bastards who have to jump round unsteerable canopies and PLF. With my recreational canopy, most landings were like stepping off a very fast escalator. We were taught how to PLF during ground school, but I never really had a landing where I needed to.




It doesn’t matter how many sky dives you've got, until you've stepped out of an airplane in total darkness at twelve hundred and fifty feet wearing ninety-five pounds of equipment and forty-two pounds of parachute, you are still a leg. Period.





Man, 1250 feet is high up. I haven't jumped from that high since airborne school.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:24:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:26:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2006 4:28:38 PM EDT by 82ndAbn]
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:27:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vito113:
Anyone who will use a 'last resort in an emergency means of escape' to exit a perfectly good and functional airplane is nuts.....


I don't think I've ever been on a "perfectly good" airplane.
Nothing like seeing some pop rivets rolling around on the deck of an ancient Air Guard C-130
to add a sense of haste toward stepping out the door.
I won't even get into foreign aircraft.....
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:28:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:33:46 PM EDT
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