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Posted: 1/30/2006 3:46:50 AM EDT
IBTP
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 3:49:26 AM EDT
This is easily solved by trying it both ways, and noting the results.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 3:50:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
This is easily solved by trying it both ways, and noting the results.









Link Posted: 1/30/2006 3:53:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By QuantumPion:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
This is easily solved by trying it both ways, and noting the results.












I'd do it myself, but I don't have venetian blinds. Thinking it through, concave side out seems to be the only reasonable choice.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 4:15:01 AM EDT
I am a Hunter Douglas Rep. Looking at the blinds from inside the room the concave side should face you. Think of it this way, from outside the window would you rather people see your head or your feet?

More important is the side to side fit. Sounds like mini blinds, I hate mini blinds they suck.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 4:17:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jcncc:
I am a Hunter Douglas Rep. Looking at the blinds from inside the room the concave side should face you. Think of it this way, from outside the window would you rather people see your head or your feet?

More important is the side to side fit. Sounds like mini blinds, I hate mini blinds they suck.



I think he's referring to blinds who's elements hang vertically.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 4:26:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/30/2006 4:26:47 AM EDT by glklvr]
1st floor: concave side to window.

2nd floor and above: concave side toward room.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 5:37:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By glklvr:
1st floor: concave side to window.

2nd floor and above: concave side toward room.



I have found the opposite.

I discovered this taking out the garbage a few years ago. Our bedroom is over our garage on the east side of the house. With the concave side in, the rising sun is blocked, but as you walk up the driveway you hit a point where there might as well be no blinds. With the concave side out only people in airplanes can look in.

Kent
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 5:58:53 AM EDT
If you're really concerned about people seeing through your blinds then you need better blinds than what it sounds like you guys have.

I have a set in my house that are precise enough that you can't see through them at all when they are closed. Each aluminum "slat" (or whatever you call them) touches when they are closed, so there are no gaps. Also, the string holes are placed in a special way so that you can't even see any holes in the blinds when they are closed.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 6:16:00 AM EDT
Just duct tape aluminum foil over all your windows, you can't see anything, it keeps all the light out, and blocks the satellite mind control rays.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 6:23:50 AM EDT
Walking around the house naked......free

Surfing the web naked.......$20

Having the neighbors see your 'willy'.........PRICELESS!
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 6:25:38 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 6:30:55 AM EDT
With venitian blinds, (horizontal blinds) it depends on day time or night time. In the day time, you want the concave side in (inside edge up) and at night you want the concave side out (inside edge down) The reason for this is light. With most lighting being above the window (the sun and cieling lamps) the light is angled downwards. Therefor, you want the blades to be at the opposite angle.

\ light from outside, / blade angle
/ light from inside, \ blade angle

Simple...

Vertical blinds (single blade from floor to cieling and multiple blades side to side), you want to angle the inside edge to the closest wall. This gives the least chance of passing in front of the opening gap in the blades.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 6:45:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Green_Canoe:

Originally Posted By glklvr:
1st floor: concave side to window.

2nd floor and above: concave side toward room.



I have found the opposite.



+1.

Also depends on day or night. When I lived in a 2 story I would go 'concave in' during the day and 'concave out' during the night upstairs. Concave out lets in more light during the day.

A lot of people don't understand the concept. I once lived in a townhouse apartment complex. I told my neighbor I could see him walking around his room at night. He didn't believe me because he had his blinds closed. I explained it to him and we set on the curb that night so I could show him examples in the neighborhood. We got a nice show from a girl across the street as she got out of the shower and folded cloths, etc., in the nude. He got the point and we found a new place to sit in the evenings.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 6:56:42 AM EDT
Remove the risk: get cellular shades. Aluminum blinds suck.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 7:58:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheCynic:
Remove the risk: get cellular shades. Aluminum blinds suck.



What's so bad about aluminum blinds?
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 10:48:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NewbHunter:

Originally Posted By TheCynic:
Remove the risk: get cellular shades. Aluminum blinds suck.



What's so bad about aluminum blinds?


They have no insulative value (3/8" double cell shades have an R value of like 6) and, IMHO, they look cheap.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 10:50:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Green_Canoe:

Originally Posted By glklvr:
1st floor: concave side to window.

2nd floor and above: concave side toward room.



I have found the opposite.

I discovered this taking out the garbage a few years ago. Our bedroom is over our garage on the east side of the house. With the concave side in, the rising sun is blocked, but as you walk up the driveway you hit a point where there might as well be no blinds. With the concave side out only people in airplanes can look in.

Kent



+87


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