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Posted: 1/28/2006 8:23:43 PM EDT
I went to the range yesterday with my AR. It's the first AR I have owned or fired, so it was a get aquainted session for me.
Dad happened to be at the range checking a .38 revolver he built up for plate matches. Since it was raining when I arrived I sighted in a Ruger MkII .22 with a reddot and shot a few plates.
When the rain stopped I told dad I had to get a rifle from the truck. When he saw the case he asked me what it was. I said it's my AR15. He said "bullshit". When I said really he said that he knew I had wanted one for a long time.
I put about 20 rounds downrange getting my scope dialled in with dad watching through the spotting scope.
I looked around, got up and told him to shoot it. He said no, but I said sit down, I'm getting a Coke.
The smile he had said it all. I need more ammo.
I need to work on my groups but we had fun.
Speaking of ammo, dad told me he has had a lot of .223 on stripper clips since the late '60s or early '70s. It's in boxes that he described as being military ammo boxes.
I will report what he has as soon as I look at it. I think I may have some surplus soon.
Jim
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 8:36:13 PM EDT
Sounds like a great time, and having fun with your Dad says it all.

Funny how they don't want to try it but as soon as they do, just like everyone, that grin comes to their faces.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 8:40:27 PM EDT
What's sad is that dad is 74 and I am 47, and just now having fun with a black rifle.
Jim
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 9:00:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pepperbelly:
What's sad is that dad is 74 and I am 47, and just now having fun with a black rifle.
Jim



Good job!

I know what you mean. In my case, dad is an avid black rifle fan since I can remember. But he did not have the opportunities I have (owning and carrying an AR) back in his day.

Today, dad is 75 and kinda weak. But I still take him out to the rangs a few times. He is happy just popping a few rounds from my AR and then we go home.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 9:30:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eye_spy:

Originally Posted By pepperbelly:
What's sad is that dad is 74 and I am 47, and just now having fun with a black rifle.
Jim



Good job!

I know what you mean. In my case, dad is an avid black rifle fan since I can remember. But he did not have the opportunities I have (owning and carrying an AR) back in his day.

Today, dad is 75 and kinda weak. But I still take him out to the rangs a few times. He is happy just popping a few rounds from my AR and then we go home.



My dad ain't weak. When we shoot falling plate matches he whips me good, unless I remind him that he shoots scoped class with a reddot and I shoot iron sights. He can't see the front sight, rear sight and the target at the same time. I still can even with an old Swede Mauser with iron sights at 100 and 200 yards.
Of course I am ranked AAA and he shoots master.
Dad taught me gun safety before I could shoot and taught me how to shoot by age 7. I am enjoying our time now while he is still in good health.
Jim
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 9:36:31 PM EDT
Cherish the time spent with your Father! None of us will be here forever. I lost my Father last July and now all I have are those good memories like you posted about.

Link Posted: 1/28/2006 9:46:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2006 9:53:29 PM EDT by sta1treeman]
I lost my Dad 2 years ago today, 2-29-04, hard to believe it's been 2 years. We spent most of our time together fishing..... Shooting, fishing, or just sitting on the porch talking, it is all priceless time, enjoy every single milisecond of it, because it hurts worse than you could ever imagine when they are gone. Edit, didn't mean to put a downer on your post, sounds like you guys had a great time, and I wish you both many happy trips, for years to come.
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 12:29:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sta1treeman:
I lost my Dad 2 years ago today, 2-29-04, hard to believe it's been 2 years. We spent most of our time together fishing..... Shooting, fishing, or just sitting on the porch talking, it is all priceless time, enjoy every single milisecond of it, because it hurts worse than you could ever imagine when they are gone. Edit, didn't mean to put a downer on your post, sounds like you guys had a great time, and I wish you both many happy trips, for years to come.



No downer, I have to face the fact that time with him gets shorter every year. There is hope that he will follow in his father's steps and live into his mid 80s. All of our family is long lived.
Dad taught me to shoot, hunt, fish when I was 3, scuba dive when I was 10, ride motorcycles at 7. He taught me how to work on motors, he was a Honda m/c mechanic starting in '65. More than anything he taught me how to figure stuff out, find out what went wrong and why, and figure out how to fix it. I can repair things I have never seen before, but it does get tiresome having to figure out some stuff from scratch- like reinventing the wheel.
When I turned 18 we became friends as well as dad/son, so I have been blessed all my life. Whatever I was interested in- football, Boy Scouts, etc. he supported even if he wasn't into it himself- he never played football. My brother and I were almost spoiled as kids. Dad grew up on a dairy farm and they didn't have much money, although they always had food. He was determined we would have almost everything we wanted.
All I can do is try to walk in his footsteps, but them is BIG boots!
Jim
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 1:34:14 PM EDT
Besides the diving, and motorcycles, our childhood sounds about the same. My Dad and I had a conversation when I was around 23, I told him, I was tired of him being my Dad, and asked, "why can't he be my friend", I also said" I know when I do wrong, and don't need you to tell me, why can't we just have fun together, without you being on my ass all the time". He said, "because I'm your Dad, not your buddy"......About 2 or 3 months later, we had been fishing, and had a few beers, he said, "Son, I've been thinking, from now own your my buddy, and if you need my advice just ask"..........I think I called him with a question everyday after, and I was 34 when he died. I never had a question, that he couldn't answer. I miss him for a 1000 reasons, but not being able to ask his advice, or just a question on how to fix somthing, is what I miss most. I always knew his answers only had my best interest in mind, without any motive. You are very blessed, to still have your Dad, and I really do wish you many more years together........Treeman
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