Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 1/27/2006 5:52:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 6:34:29 PM EDT by Tras]
What is the thickness of one quart of liquid (57.75 cubic inches) poured onto an area of 36x18 inches?
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:53:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:53:55 PM EDT
Unsolvable, need the amount of liquid.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:54:10 PM EDT
I think you're missing some of the problem there bud
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:55:33 PM EDT
Need a volume for the liquid to solve.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:55:44 PM EDT
Pi(e).
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:56:34 PM EDT
87
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:58:34 PM EDT
I have a math problem too.

How tall is that building?

Please specify in inches.

Thanks
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:00:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 6:01:14 PM EDT by USMC88-93]
need the amount of liquid
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:02:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:
I have a math problem too.

How tall is that building?

Please specify in inches.

Thanks


87.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:03:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:

Originally Posted By krpind:
I have a math problem too.

How tall is that building?

Please specify in inches.

Thanks


87.



THanks
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:04:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Tras:
What is the thickness of a liquid poured onto an area of 36x18 inches?



Not as thick as your skull.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:06:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 6:07:37 PM EDT by gardenWeasel]
Anhydrous ethanol has a specific density of .79.
Hope this helps.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:08:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By walrus:
Pi(e).



Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:33:08 PM EDT
One quart.

Damnit.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:36:53 PM EDT
I've been awake too long, so this may not be correct but I came up with 0.08912 inches thick as one quart is 57.75 cubic inches, spread over an area of 648 square inches
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:40:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheRedHorseman:
I've been awake too long, so this may not be correct but I came up with 0.08912 inches thick as one quart is 57.75 cubic inches, spread over an area of 648 square inches



Yeah, assuming that the borders of the area are going to contain the liquid, this is the number I got too, and I'm a kolidge ejikated enginear...

Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:41:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Tras:
What is the thickness of one quart of liquid (57.75 cubic inches) poured onto an area of 36x18 inches?



0.08912037037037037037037037037037 inches or 89 thousanths

57.75 cubic inches/(36x18 inches)

I checked with my wife, she's a math teacher...
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:42:00 PM EDT
Simple division didn't seem right for some reason. Seems like it'd be thicker too...
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:48:08 PM EDT
V = l*w*h
57.75 cubic inches = 36 in. * 18 in. * ?
? = .089 inch, like has been shown by a few people already

it's reasonable that it would barely cover the surface of a shape a yard by half a yard. It's just a quart.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:55:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 6:57:01 PM EDT by cnorton]

Originally Posted By Tras:
Simple division didn't seem right for some reason. Seems like it'd be thicker too...



A good way of checking your work is through cancelling units.

57.75 cubic inches (inch x inch x inch) / 36 inch x 18 inch

Gives thickness of 0.08912 inches. And if the units don't cancel out, it means you did something wrong. Hope this helps.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 7:04:59 PM EDT
Zanka all. Especially given my earlier drink-induced retardation.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 7:09:03 PM EDT

57.75/36/18 = 0.0891 inches
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 7:13:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 7:13:48 PM EDT by home_with_kids]
ARkie said:
0.089120370370370370370370370370376 inches or 89 thousanths

fixed the error in the last digit for you
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 7:18:29 PM EDT
when I was in college one of the tests involved solving for lift distribution across a wing. There was a lot of matrix math (before personal computers, so we had to do matrices by hand). One girl in our class solved a 16x16 matrix BY HAND (sixteen simultaneous linear equations), and wrote a final answer with 12 decimal places.

The instructor circled the last number in this long decimal string, and noted "error", and took a point off.

We were all engineering students, and nobody was getting laid, so this is what passed for humor.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 6:47:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By cnorton:

Originally Posted By Tras:
Simple division didn't seem right for some reason. Seems like it'd be thicker too...



A good way of checking your work is through cancelling units.

57.75 cubic inches (inch x inch x inch) / 36 inch x 18 inch

Gives thickness of 0.08912 inches. And if the units don't cancel out, it means you did something wrong. Hope this helps.



Surface Tension of the liquid?
Top Top