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Posted: 1/21/2006 3:34:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:39:30 PM EDT
I write down what I have to memorize. Seems to work great for me.

I don't do nearly as well if I just read things to myself as I do when I take a pen and put things down on paper.

Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:39:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:42:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:47:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Red_Beard:
I write down what I have to memorize. Seems to work great for me.

I don't do nearly as well if I just read things to myself as I do when I take a pen and put things down on paper.




+1

this works great for languages too, where speaking and writing will help you solidify new vocabulary and grammatical rules.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:49:40 PM EDT
don't smoke weed.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:52:03 PM EDT
Don't try to memorize the entire lecture. Just take very brief notes during the lecture (maybe 1 or 2 pages an hour) and try to memorize that information. The act of writing it down will help with memorization. Also, look for a hierarchy of information; it will help you group the facts together.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:54:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:58:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By medicmandan:

Originally Posted By nsgerard:
Don't try to memorize the entire lecture. Just take very brief notes during the lecture (maybe 1 or 2 pages an hour) and try to memorize that information. The act of writing it down will help with memorization. Also, look for a hierarchy of information; it will help you group the facts together.



It's actually a lecture that I need to give, about 15 pages worth that I need to learn pretty much word for word.



This is hard for some people to do, but you need to change your state of mind.

If you want to memorize something, do not think of it as needing to learn something, think of it as wanting to learn something. How do you think most of us know almost all the gun legislations by heart? We WANTED to learn them and while we read it we WANTED to remember it.

Same thing goes for school, trick yourself into wanting to learn the information and it will be alot easier than forcing yourself to do so.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:58:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By medicmandan:

Originally Posted By nsgerard:
Don't try to memorize the entire lecture. Just take very brief notes during the lecture (maybe 1 or 2 pages an hour) and try to memorize that information. The act of writing it down will help with memorization. Also, look for a hierarchy of information; it will help you group the facts together.



It's actually a lecture that I need to give, about 15 pages worth that I need to learn pretty much word for word.



then you need to memorize and understand every concept you are to speak about
not leave anything out and add specifics

you can then give the lecture in your own words

unless you really need to memorize 15 pages, in which case
good luck
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 3:59:11 PM EDT
I would suggest using flash cards... pick out the important parts, right them down.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 4:11:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Red_Beard:
I write down what I have to memorize. Seems to work great for me.

I don't do nearly as well if I just read things to myself as I do when I take a pen and put things down on paper.




+1. Alternate writing it out longhand and reading it aloud. Then work in using a coach you as you recite. I have memorized tons of stuff (much of which has faded from lack of use). I think the reading/writing/reading aloud/reciting program must engage your whole brain. In any event, it works.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 4:11:57 PM EDT


Chunk it into smaller parts and start memorizing the parts (i.e., 1 paragragh at a time).

Repetition with feedback. Have someone listen, read, and correct you as you are learning. If you can't find a person, then videotape yourself.

When you give your lecture, have one note card or sheet of paper with key ideas (primers or cues for each paragraph).

Memorizing a 15 page lecture is tough unless you are already very familar with the contents.

Once you have it all memorized (i.e., you can get through it without any errors) keep practicing it.

Typically we forget things we memorize as soon as we stop rehearsing them.

Link Posted: 1/21/2006 4:32:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By medicmandan:

Originally Posted By nsgerard:
Don't try to memorize the entire lecture. Just take very brief notes during the lecture (maybe 1 or 2 pages an hour) and try to memorize that information. The act of writing it down will help with memorization. Also, look for a hierarchy of information; it will help you group the facts together.



It's actually a lecture that I need to give, about 15 pages worth that I need to learn pretty much word for word.



I agree with the people that say you should write things down. I'd like to add that you need to organize your thoughts, so the best way to proceed is to outline your talk and place your "Slide" numbers in the left hand column. Do not try to simply do the outline in Power Point, you need to move your fingers.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 4:32:06 PM EDT
+1 on reading/saying it aloud. You are re-enforcing with your "hearing" whay your brain is saying AND the motor skills of actually forming the words and lines. WAY better than just reading it over and over. Stay safe
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 6:33:53 PM EDT
Read 1st line aloud looking at the text.

Read the same line aloud NOT looking at the text.

Read the 1st and 2nd line aloud looking at the text.

Read the 1st and 2nd line aloud NOT looking at the text.

...
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 6:40:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By medicmandan:
I have some fairly lengthy lectures to memorize and was looking for some tips. Anyone find a program that helps them memorize quickly? I currently just read and reread until I have it memorized, but that takes forever.



My technique is to make an outline of the lecture, with the important topics in bold and subsequant information underneath them.

Then, you should study and learn the material well enough that you can talk casually and smoothly about it. The speach should be less of a regurgitation of information than a conversation with the audience. if you know the material well enough, you will be able to speak about it well. An outline or some notecards should be all you need.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 6:59:58 PM EDT
I agree with all who said writing it down and reading it over and over. Also breaking it into chunks will help you remember the flow of it.
Also, add physical movement to each section:
wave your hand around while writing/reading through 1st section
tap your foot while writing/reading through 2nd section
...
Don't actually do those moves during the speech, but your body will remember the movements you designated for each section and help with the words coming out of your mouth.

Your body and mind really are connected in ways we still don't really know.
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