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Posted: 1/12/2006 6:58:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2006 7:03:00 AM EDT by LANCEMAN]
Better not go catch a plane after doing some reloading or shooting you might set off the machine. Anybody familiar with these ? I wonder if you wore a jacket or hat shooting then walked through the detctor days or weeks later if it would set it off maybe from the powder smoke or residue on your clothes.




Want to fly? Better not smell like da bomb

Passengers departing through checkpoint D at Charlotte/Douglas International Airport reacted with surprise and amused yelps as they passed through new bomb detectors Wednesday.
"It was a little scary," Evette Silva said as she emerged from the scanner. However, she said, it beats the old-fashioned patdown method. She and others said they also appreciated the fact you don't need to remove your shoes for this screening -- although many were shedding shoes Wednesday out of habit.

The Ionscan Sentinel II portals are equipped with more than a dozen air jets and take 17 seconds to analyze air samples, which supposedly is faster than old-fashioned hand searches.
They're known as puffer machines, a slight misnomer. They emit not so much a puff as a series of air jets that whoosh passengers as they pass.

The airport now has the machines at three of four checkpoints, A, C and D. Wednesday was the first full day of operation in Charlotte for the $170,000 machines. Transportation Security Administration officials say they didn't have the money to install the equipment at all checkpoints.

On Wednesday, airport security directed almost all passengers through the secondary-screening scanners at checkpoint D. However, a security spokesman said that when the checkpoints are busy, some passengers selected for secondary screening will be hand-checked.
The machines, to be deployed in about 40 of the nation's busiest airports by spring, analyze air samples to detect explosives, including gun powder and traces of nitroglycerin.

Although the equipment is designed to bolster detection of explosives and speed the screening process, passengers who are directed through the machines still have to pass through a metal detector. On top of that, some passengers Wednesday also underwent a third, manual inspection that included a belt-buckle check and a sweep of a handheld metal detector.
The explosive-sniffing machines sound an alarm if they detect a potential hazardous substance and have to be reset, which includes a wipe-down with a cleanser. The restart process takes a few minutes. Meanwhile, TSA inspectors conduct a manual search of the suspect passenger to determine what set off the machine.

TSA spokesman Dwain Wilkins said that during hunting season it's common for some passengers to inadvertently carry ammunition through checkpoints, which the machines will detect. Passengers caught carrying ammo at the airport typically will have some explaining to do with law enforcement, he added.

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http://www.philly.com/mld/charlotte/business/13606004.htm?source=rss&channel=charlotte_business
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:04:38 AM EDT
They've had them in Tampa for a few years now
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:05:12 AM EDT
Old news.

When I arrived in dallas last october I was puffed at the security checkpoint.


Kind of pissed me off since I was still in DCUs, I had just started my R&R leave from Iraq.

Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:07:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2006 7:10:08 AM EDT by wildearp]
GE makes one of these. They had a system in the Tampa airport (was there this weekend). Very slow. It was nice getting a blowjob before the flight.

Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:07:43 AM EDT
Nothing new. Had an associate who was in Group get pulled to the side because his pants had C4 residue on them from some trainig he had done earlier in the week.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:12:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2006 7:13:21 AM EDT by Dolomite]

Originally Posted By svtfast:
Old news.


Yep - there was a post on this over on Glock Talk, and it's nothing to get all worried about.

I was flying out of Nashville and my sandals set off their sniffer because I had spent the night before drunk off my ass at a friends house lighting off about $100 in fireworks.

[hysteric freeper mode=ON]I had to go over to the special screening area where they've got the yellow foot prints painted on the floor, ordered to take off my sandals so that they could be X-rayed, and then I was wand raped over and over again by someone of a different sex and race.[/OFF]

The whole thing lasted around 2 minutes.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:16:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dolomite:

Originally Posted By svtfast:
Old news.


Yep - there was a post on this over on Glock Talk, and it's nothing to get all worried about.

I was flying out of Nashville and my sandals set off their sniffer because I had spent the night before drunk off my ass at a friends house lighting off about $100 in fireworks.

[hysteric freeper mode=ON]I had to go over to the special screening area where they've got the yellow foot prints painted on the floor, ordered to take off my sandals so that they could be X-rayed, and then I was wand raped over and over again by someone of a different sex and race.[/OFF]

The whole thing lasted around 2 minutes.



Good stories, I was mainly interested if anyone had actually heard of them picking up stuff like that. I haven't had to fly commercially in a couple of years thankfully
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:24:46 AM EDT
I have flown w/ gun cases, they swab the handles and locks with that little patch. those cases had been on the range for a long time. never have set of an alarm. I don't know what they re looking for.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 4:31:18 PM EDT
On my last flight to Alaska they sniffed my stuff. I had a two rifles and a box a handloaded ammo. Plus most of my outdoor stuff is stored in the same room I reload in. I told this to the guy and he said the machine would not alarm on smokeless powder.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 4:45:58 PM EDT
Good. The 9/11 plotters planned to blow up 10 747s simultaneously in the 1990s. Their bombs were nitroglycerine, smuggled in those big bottles of contact lens solution. Their writwatches were converted to timers. They'd board the plane, and fly a short leg before the 747 continued across the Pacific. They planned to assemble the bombs in the lavs, stash the bomb under the seat, leaving it behind when they deplaned. They would have been stopped by the sniffer, they were only stopped by sheer luck when their bomb factory in a Manila apartment caught fire, attracting the police.
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