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Posted: 1/9/2006 12:59:37 PM EDT
http://animalid.aphis.usda.gov/nais/index.shtml

http://www.freetennessee.org/NAIS_proposal_overview.html

http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=48237

All cows, sheep, chickens everything must have a RFID chip implanted in them by 2009, and it will be registered to your house and GPS coordinates. You will have to pay for it of course, and if you don't register them. $1000 a day fine. Even if you have ONE chicken, one duck one whatever!

What happens when the government takes control of your property, but allows you to use it?

I think it's called fascism
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:00:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 1:01:42 PM EDT by twonami]
why would you even bother sticking them in poultry that has a short life span.
ETA: I'd like to see how they are going to enforce it
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:03:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By twonami:
why would you even bother sticking them in poultry that has a short life span.
ETA: I'd like to see how they are going to enforce it



The $1000 a day fine that they will impose. It's not like the Government doesnt know where our farms are. I can see it for small farms that existed before the requirement, that don't have a lot of animals, mainly for personal use. But not for the huge commercial farms and animals bought after 09
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:04:57 PM EDT
Wait until they stick one in YOU!
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:05:46 PM EDT
RFID. the next requirment for any NFA item.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:14:13 PM EDT
DILLIGAF
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:16:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 1:16:27 PM EDT by NewbHunter]
WTF?

Tagged
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:17:32 PM EDT
lol....that's funny.

Animals screw. it happens.

Now the .gov wants to tax us on nature? I mean, that's all it is... a revenue generating measure...
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:20:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mcnielsen:
Wait until they stick one in YOU!



That happens when you eat the chicken.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:25:58 PM EDT
animalid.aphis.usda.gov/nais/newsroom/factsheets/nais_overview_factsheet.shtml


National Animal Identification System: Overview
The National Animal Identification System (NAIS) is a national program intended to identify animals and track them as they come into contact with, or commingle with, animals other than herdmates from their premises of origin.

The system is being developed for all animals that will benefit from rapid tracebacks in the event of a disease concern. Currently, working groups comprised of industry and government representatives are developing plans for cattle, swine, sheep, goats, horses, poultry, bison, deer, elk, llamas, and alpacas.

Already, many of these species can be identified through some sort of identification system, but these systems are not consistent across the country. Tracing an animalճ movements can therefore be a timeУonsuming endeavor during a disease investigation, especially if the animal has moved across State lines.

In April 2004, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced the framework for implementing the NAISѡn animal identification and tracking system that will be used in all States and that will operate under national standards. When fully operational, the system will be capable of tracing a sick animal or group of animals back to the herd or premises that is the most likely source of infection. It will also be able to trace potentially exposed animals that were moved out from that herd or premises. The sooner animal health officials can identify infected and exposed animals and premises, the sooner they can contain the disease and stop its spread.

The NAIS will enhance U.S. efforts to respond to intentionally or unintentionally introduced animal disease outbreaks more quickly and effectively. USDAճ longдerm goal is to establish a system that can identify all premises and animals that have had direct contact with a foreign animal disease or a domestic disease of concern within 48 hours of discovery.

The first step in implementing the NAIS is identifying and registering premises that house animals. Such premises would include locations where livestock and poultry are managed, marketed, or exhibited. Knowing where animals are located is the key to efficient, accurate, and cost-effective epidemiologic investigations and disease-control efforts.

USDA anticipates that all States will have the capability to register premises according to the national standards by 2005. Officials with USDAճ Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) are currently training State officials how to use a standardized premises registration system. USDA is also evaluating alternative registration systems that States or others have developed and want to use, to ensure these systems meet the national standards. In addition, USDA is working with States and industry to educate the public about the NAIS.

As premises are registered, another component of the NAISѡnimal identificationѷill be integrated into the system. Unique animal identification numbers (AINs) will be issued to individually identified premises. In the case of animals that move in groups through the production chainѳuch as swine and poultryѴhe group will be identified through a group/lot identification number (Group/Lot IDs).

USDA is developing the standards for collecting and reporting information, but industry will determine which type of identification method works best for each species. These methods could include radio frequency identification tags, retinal scans, DNA, or others. As long as the necessary data are sent to USDAճ information repositories in a standardized form, it will be accepted.

USDA will build upon existing identification systems and allow for a transition period from systems currently defined in the Code of Federal Regulations before requiring AINs or Group/Lot IDs. Working with States and industry, USDA will also evaluate various animal identification technologies to determine how the collection of animal movement records can best be automated. And we will encourage as much participation as possible.

As premises are registered and animals or groups of animals are identified based on the standard protocols, USDA will begin collecting information about animal movements from one premises to another. With an efficient, effective animal tracking system in place, USDA will be able to perform rapid tracebacks in case of an animal disease outbreak. As envisioned, only Federal, State, and Tribal animal health authorities would have direct access to the national premises and animal identification information repositories. They need this information to accomplish their job of safeguarding animal health.

USDA is investigating various options to protect the confidentiality of the information. It is important to note that the national repositories will include information only for animal and disease tracking purposes. Proprietary production data will remain in private databases.

If USDA decides to make all or parts of the NAIS mandatory, APHIS will follow the normal rulemaking process. The public will have the opportunity to comment upon any proposed regulations.




How the hell are they gonna tag a few million deer???

Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:34:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Merrell:

How the hell are they gonna tag a few million deer???





It's for the commercial deer ranch. Believe it or not, that's where most of the wasting type sickness spread from.


Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:44:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Merrell:

How the hell are they gonna tag a few million deer???




They probably mean domesticated deer, not wild deer.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 2:07:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 2:09:09 PM EDT by wise_jake]

Originally Posted By Merrell:
animalid.aphis.usda.gov/nais/newsroom/factsheets/nais_overview_factsheet.shtml

National Animal Identification System: Overview
The National Animal Identification System (NAIS) is a national program intended to identify animals and track them as they come into contact with, or commingle with, animals other than herdmates from their premises of origin.

The system is being developed for all animals that will benefit from rapid tracebacks in the event of a disease concern. Currently, working groups comprised of industry and government representatives are developing plans for cattle, swine, sheep, goats, horses, poultry, bison, deer, elk, llamas, and alpacas.

Already, many of these species can be identified through some sort of identification system, but these systems are not consistent across the country. Tracing an animalճ movements can therefore be a timeУonsuming endeavor during a disease investigation, especially if the animal has moved across State lines.

<snip>


How the hell are they gonna tag a few million deer???



How the hell did FDR bring this country out of the Great Depression?

Why, the WPA, of course.

Note: My question was, at best, facetious.

Seriously, they'll either just flat out hire the ppl to do it, and/or we'll pay for it as part of the licensing/tagging fee. Prolly not wild deer, though.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 2:12:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dance:

Originally Posted By Merrell:

How the hell are they gonna tag a few million deer???




They probably mean domesticated deer, not wild deer.



There is no such thing as a domesticated deer.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 2:14:29 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 2:19:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 7:49:14 PM EDT by wise_jake]

Originally Posted By Paul:
I know where they can stick mine.



<edited by Paul>

Just kidding.


(just for clarification, the part I was kidding about was where Paul edited my post; there was never anything to edit )
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 5:58:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:

There is no such thing as a domesticated deer.



Deer are raised like cattle and swine for much the same reason. Domestic deer.

www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleprint/1623/-1/1

Link Posted: 1/9/2006 6:12:34 PM EDT
Stupid and waste of money.

Where are the chips for musk ox?
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 6:14:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Waldo:

Originally Posted By Merrell:

How the hell are they gonna tag a few million deer???





It's for the commercial deer ranch. Believe it or not, that's where most of the wasting type sickness spread from.






That's what happens when they feed living with the ground up remains of the dead.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 6:17:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Red_Beard:

Originally Posted By Waldo:

Originally Posted By Merrell:

How the hell are they gonna tag a few million deer???





It's for the commercial deer ranch. Believe it or not, that's where most of the wasting type sickness spread from.






That's what happens when they feed living with the ground up remains of the dead.



Zombie bambi?
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 6:33:42 PM EDT


These are the days of Mad Cow, CWD, and Bird Flu.

Really, What's the big deal? Cattle already have a half assed "tracking" system with ear tags, ect. Probably the best way to control a pandemic.

Offer a better idea.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:44:45 PM EDT
This is just a test... and of course, "for your own good".

Next it will be your children, "for their own good".
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:48:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Waldo:

These are the days of Mad Cow, CWD, and Bird Flu.

Really, What's the big deal? Cattle already have a half assed "tracking" system with ear tags, ect. Probably the best way to control a pandemic.

Offer a better idea.



Next it will be your own pets, then it will be us. "For our own good", because we could possibly the host of a virus one day, it will help the Government track us down and help prevent contaminating the rest of the public.

When will you PEOPLE GET IT.

As fight4yourrights sig says "either grow a pair or get on the cattle car"

That kind of attitude leads to the cattle car.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:51:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
This is just a test... and of course, "for your own good".

Next it will be your children, "for their own good".


[if_i_were_to_drink_the_koolaid]
Why not, they're doing it in Mexico, for their own good. Would you rather be kidnapped?
[/if_i_were_to_drink_the_koolaid]
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:51:18 PM EDT
Dupeage.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:53:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mcnielsen:
Wait until they stick one in YOU!



... I already got mine last year
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 7:57:57 PM EDT
wise_jake- "How the hell did FDR bring this country out of the Great Depression?"

World War Two. Nothing like a war to rev up the economy. The depression came to an end when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 10:27:27 PM EDT
No way I will get RFID.


Link Posted: 1/10/2006 1:56:36 AM EDT
Well the thread title should read "RFID on all Livestock by 2009".... and I think a lot of US operations use radio-ear tags now anyway, don't they? If they were standardizing any method, it would only make sense to try for teh most-advanced method--since putting the plan into action will take a few years.

And the matter here once again is inventory tracking. You just drive the herds through gates with detectors, and the gate will read all the ID #'s automatically.

Don't worry--they haven't said anything about putting RFID tags into packages of aluminum foil yet....
~
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:22:48 AM EDT
Hey Tango7:


Dupeage.


Either post the link or STFU
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:46:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:12:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NAM:
lol....that's funny.

Animals screw. it happens.

Now the .gov wants to tax us on nature? I mean, that's all it is... a revenue generating measure...



Animals screwing is a privilege. Now pay up.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:20:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CAR-10:

Originally Posted By NAM:
lol....that's funny.

Animals screw. it happens.

Now the .gov wants to tax us on nature? I mean, that's all it is... a revenue generating measure...



Animals screwing is a privilege. Now pay up.



There's no constitutional right to breed your animals, so any opposition to laws regulating that should be abandoned.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:37:20 AM EDT
Before they start 'tagging' animals, I think they should test this system on 'Preditors' AKA Child molesters and pedophiles. They are the real ANIMALS and danger as far as I'm concerned!!!...
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:12:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Gloftoe:

Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf:

Originally Posted By mcnielsen:
Wait until they stick one in YOU!



... I already got mine last year





Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:22:31 AM EDT
So I guess the cattle farmers have to just shut up and pay up? I don't suppose these tags are going to be free are they? Well, enjoy your steak, because the price is going up.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:49:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By okiehunter39:
So I guess the cattle farmers have to just shut up and pay up? I don't suppose these tags are going to be free are they? Well, enjoy your steak, because the price is going up.


Thanks a fucking lot, Oprah!
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:58:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By okiehunter39:
So I guess the cattle farmers have to just shut up and pay up? I don't suppose these tags are going to be free are they? Well, enjoy your steak, because the price is going up.



RFID's have been used in livestock for years. It's actually cheaper and easier than ear tags. Only a damn fool would have 650K in livestock and not have some way to trace the animals. There is still such a thing as rustling. We went to the system in 1993 and we're hardly a major operation.

But hey, if tinfoil validates your world, go for it.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 8:05:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 8:08:21 AM EDT by Floppy_833]
....I am pretty sure that some US states already require RFID chips in dangerous/exotic pets--big cats, bears, ect. And you can get them for your pet most places. Animal pounds and medical-use labs are supposed to check for RFID chips before ,, eh,,, killing an animal......
~
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:19:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Johninaustin:

Originally Posted By okiehunter39:
So I guess the cattle farmers have to just shut up and pay up? I don't suppose these tags are going to be free are they? Well, enjoy your steak, because the price is going up.



RFID's have been used in livestock for years. It's actually cheaper and easier than ear tags. Only a damn fool would have 650K in livestock and not have some way to trace the animals. There is still such a thing as rustling. We went to the system in 1993 and we're hardly a major operation.

But hey, if tinfoil validates your world, go for it.



It has nothing to do with tinfoil. We have 700 head of cattle. How much does each tag cost? Now, take that right out of our pockets. Gee, thanks.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:21:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By twonami:
why would you even bother sticking them in poultry that has a short life span.
ETA: I'd like to see how they are going to enforce it



No kidding...it's not possible.

HH
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