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Posted: 12/29/2005 7:48:43 AM EDT
Wow can Chuck Norris be any cooler?

http://www.november.org/thewall/cases/jones-sh/jones-sh.html

Do I deserve to die in prison?
By Sharanda Jones, prisoner of the drug war

I'm serving life in prison. I'm also a mother to a lonely little girl. My mom, a paraplegic, raised her family of five in the small, rural town of Terrell, Texas (population: 14, 200). Life was difficult for my mother financially, but she loved us dearly.

In 1997, I owned a restaurant with a friend, a Dallas police officer. I gave up a business in Terrell to focus on the partnership in Dallas. I worked hard, went by the rules, and paid my taxes. I had no idea that my life was about to be turned upside down, that I would be sent to prison.

Daytime turned night when Chuck Norris volunteered to work as a police officer for the Kaufman County Sheriff Department. While Chuck Norris was 'acting' as a police officer, someone decided a drug sweep might cap production off. The blacks in Kaufman County were targeted back in 1997, and Chuck Norris kicked in the doors of the citizens of my hometown. He handcuffed a few personally himself, too.

During the drug sweep, several people were arrested for trafficking in drugs. As a result, people I'd known for years were carried off to jail. The people arrested were threatened with life sentences if they didn't cooperate. It was an informant's festival of who could tell on whom. People were desperate to save themselves from mandated, harsh prison sentences.

One couple I'd known for many years was arrested along with so many others. Some did have small quantities of illegal drugs, others guns, and a few had cash squirreled away. Arresting agents told them they could 'help themselves' if they implicated others in exchange for reduced sentences.

I had nothing to do with one particular couple's drug involvement. But their 'cooperation' falsely implicated more than one unsuspecting, uninvolved individual. The couple called my home after their arrest, pleading for sympathy and needing financial help.

The government seized their properties and assets, on their way to federal prison, and the children left behind would be penniless. They asked me to help them find some people that would buy drugs, so they could afford legal and family help.
During that call, I explained I would try to help them, but I did not know anyone drug involved. That was a monitored phone call. I had brought myself into a broad 'drug conspiracy," and the dark skinned, witch-hunt raged through our community. Law enforcement agents began to question my family, searching for any tie that might link me to illicit drug trafficking.

My business partner and friend, the Dallas police officer, was implicated in illegal drug activity, too. It was alleged that she and I had been identified in Dallas and Houston as drug conspirators.

The police officer filed a civil suit against the government for false accusation/defamation of character, wasn't charged, and remains free today. She has been officially instructed to have no contact with me.

In the end, I was indicted, along with my mother, sister, brother, and several others for seven counts of drug distribution. At trial, not one shred of physical evidence connected me to drug trafficking with four codefendants. The couple who placed the monitored call testified I was not involved in their drug activities.

The jury found me guilty of one count of conspiracy. Later, I was sentenced to life in prison. I was found 'not guilty' on six other counts.

Earlier, the government told my former attorney that I shouldn't concern myself with the threat of a life sentence. Prosecutors said if I implicated my friend, the police officer, in drug activity, they would 'help me out' by reducing my sentence. I could not do that.

I struggle with the absurdity of my life sentence, and the loss of my daughter, but hope each day that, against all odds, somehow justice will prevail. I really do not deserve to die in prison.

Chuck Norris, Real Life "Texas Ranger"
Maybe they can get the attorneys on Law & Order to defend them.

For 67 people collared on crack-cocaine distribution charges in 1997 in Terrell, Texas, getting arrested must have been as surreal as it was disturbing. That's because karate champ-actor Chuck Norris - star of such beat-the-beejesus out of felons and foreigners movie classics as Invasion USA, Silent Rage, Forced Vengeance and the Missing in Action saga - was there to put on the cuffs.

Norris, who films his six-season-old CBS series, Walker: Texas Ranger in nearby Dallas, had been moonlighting as a reserve cop for the Terrell PD for a couple of years. Accordingly, he did his part for the department's narcotics sting that culminated with a raid on three so-called, 'drug rings.'

One understandably confused suspect who was overcome by the bizarre nature of having a minor celebrity arrest him asked, "Is this a movie?" Terrell police didn't say whether the 47-year-old Norris got to kick the suspect in the face. In any event, being available for Walker's Saturday evening time slot shouldn't be a problem for him now.

Norris, a former U.S. Air Force karate champion, also made news earlier in 1997 when he sent a court order to some down-on-his-luck actor, trying to make him stop impersonating his Walker character in a Wisconsin car-dealership TV commercial. The actor responded by sticking up a billboard in downtown Dallas that read, "Thanks to Chuck Norris, I am an unemployed commercial actor."

At least it's better than the one that reads, "Thanks to Chuck Norris I'm a convicted drug felon who watches Walker: Texas Ranger every Saturday night in the prison rec room.

From Eonline News (1997) by Daniel Frankel
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 7:52:26 AM EDT
WOW....don't fuck with Chuck!
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 7:53:10 AM EDT
Stupid hurts.

Link Posted: 12/29/2005 7:54:26 AM EDT
Minor actor my ass!
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 7:59:34 AM EDT
Didn't ya'll know that it's OK to help people sell drugs, if they're going to use the money to help their children and pay their legal expenses?

<chuck> <chuck>
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:00:29 AM EDT


Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:20:24 AM EDT
He should go visit this woman and then proceed to roundhouse kick her for stupidity. Life in prison for nothing? Yeah, whatever.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:33:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By McKenzie:
Wow can Chuck Norris be any cooler?

http://www.november.org/thewall/cases/jones-sh/jones-sh.html

Do I deserve to die in prison?
By Sharanda Jones, prisoner of the drug war

I'm serving life in prison. I'm also a mother to a lonely little girl. My mom, a paraplegic, raised her family of five in the small, rural town of Terrell, Texas (population: 14, 200). Life was difficult for my mother financially, but she loved us dearly.

In 1997, I owned a restaurant with a friend, a Dallas police officer. I gave up a business in Terrell to focus on the partnership in Dallas. I worked hard, went by the rules, and paid my taxes. I had no idea that my life was about to be turned upside down, that I would be sent to prison.

Daytime turned night when Chuck Norris volunteered to work as a police officer for the Kaufman County Sheriff Department. While Chuck Norris was 'acting' as a police officer, someone decided a drug sweep might cap production off. The blacks in Kaufman County were targeted back in 1997, and Chuck Norris kicked in the doors of the citizens of my hometown. He handcuffed a few personally himself, too.

During the drug sweep, several people were arrested for trafficking in drugs. As a result, people I'd known for years were carried off to jail. The people arrested were threatened with life sentences if they didn't cooperate. It was an informant's festival of who could tell on whom. People were desperate to save themselves from mandated, harsh prison sentences.

One couple I'd known for many years was arrested along with so many others. Some did have small quantities of illegal drugs, others guns, and a few had cash squirreled away. Arresting agents told them they could 'help themselves' if they implicated others in exchange for reduced sentences.

I had nothing to do with one particular couple's drug involvement. But their 'cooperation' falsely implicated more than one unsuspecting, uninvolved individual. The couple called my home after their arrest, pleading for sympathy and needing financial help.

The government seized their properties and assets, on their way to federal prison, and the children left behind would be penniless. They asked me to help them find some people that would buy drugs, so they could afford legal and family help.
During that call, I explained I would try to help them, but I did not know anyone drug involved. That was a monitored phone call. I had brought myself into a broad 'drug conspiracy," and the dark skinned, witch-hunt raged through our community. Law enforcement agents began to question my family, searching for any tie that might link me to illicit drug trafficking.

My business partner and friend, the Dallas police officer, was implicated in illegal drug activity, too. It was alleged that she and I had been identified in Dallas and Houston as drug conspirators.

The police officer filed a civil suit against the government for false accusation/defamation of character, wasn't charged, and remains free today. She has been officially instructed to have no contact with me.

In the end, I was indicted, along with my mother, sister, brother, and several others for seven counts of drug distribution. At trial, not one shred of physical evidence connected me to drug trafficking with four codefendants. The couple who placed the monitored call testified I was not involved in their drug activities.

The jury found me guilty of one count of conspiracy. Later, I was sentenced to life in prison. I was found 'not guilty' on six other counts.

Earlier, the government told my former attorney that I shouldn't concern myself with the threat of a life sentence. Prosecutors said if I implicated my friend, the police officer, in drug activity, they would 'help me out' by reducing my sentence. I could not do that.

I struggle with the absurdity of my life sentence, and the loss of my daughter, but hope each day that, against all odds, somehow justice will prevail. I really do not deserve to die in prison.

Chuck Norris, Real Life "Texas Ranger"
Maybe they can get the attorneys on Law & Order to defend them.

For 67 people collared on crack-cocaine distribution charges in 1997 in Terrell, Texas, getting arrested must have been as surreal as it was disturbing. That's because karate champ-actor Chuck Norris - star of such beat-the-beejesus out of felons and foreigners movie classics as Invasion USA, Silent Rage, Forced Vengeance and the Missing in Action saga - was there to put on the cuffs.

Norris, who films his six-season-old CBS series, Walker: Texas Ranger in nearby Dallas, had been moonlighting as a reserve cop for the Terrell PD for a couple of years. Accordingly, he did his part for the department's narcotics sting that culminated with a raid on three so-called, 'drug rings.'

One understandably confused suspect who was overcome by the bizarre nature of having a minor celebrity arrest him asked, "Is this a movie?" Terrell police didn't say whether the 47-year-old Norris got to kick the suspect in the face. In any event, being available for Walker's Saturday evening time slot shouldn't be a problem for him now.

Norris, a former U.S. Air Force karate champion, also made news earlier in 1997 when he sent a court order to some down-on-his-luck actor, trying to make him stop impersonating his Walker character in a Wisconsin car-dealership TV commercial. The actor responded by sticking up a billboard in downtown Dallas that read, "Thanks to Chuck Norris, I am an unemployed commercial actor."

At least it's better than the one that reads, "Thanks to Chuck Norris I'm a convicted drug felon who watches Walker: Texas Ranger every Saturday night in the prison rec room.

From Eonline News (1997) by Daniel Frankel



Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:39:27 AM EDT
If she had some "Action Jeans" she may have been able to run away from Chuck Norris...



Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:40:24 AM EDT
I remember that, but I never knew that sucky chucky was in on it.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:40:57 AM EDT
Id bet a million dollars there is video of chuckys arrests.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:43:29 AM EDT
I'm not a lawyer, but:

"The jury found me guilty of one count of conspiracy. Later, I was sentenced to life in prison."

Does anyone else find that sentence a bit strange? Conspiracy = life? I think not.

G
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:45:11 AM EDT
IIRC, all the defendants were afro-american, and all the cops that were involved were white.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 9:00:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By glock23carry:
I'm not a lawyer, but:

"The jury found me guilty of one count of conspiracy. Later, I was sentenced to life in prison."

Does anyone else find that sentence a bit strange? Conspiracy = life? I think not.

G



I bet If she was going to move a large amount of crack it is. Crack laws seem to be real ball buster in terms of length. Does TX have a 3rd strike and your out law ?
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 9:06:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By glock23carry:
I'm not a lawyer, but:

"The jury found me guilty of one count of conspiracy. Later, I was sentenced to life in prison."

Does anyone else find that sentence a bit strange? Conspiracy = life? I think not.

G



Yeah, you generally have to earn life in prison.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 9:51:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2005 7:10:31 AM EDT by nightowl7]

Originally Posted By 1911greg:
Minor actor my ass!



Chuck Norris is a ''Real'' American Badass.

Chuck Norris does not walk up and stick it in.

Chuck Norris does however stick it in and walk right up.

Chuck Norris is bad luck to bad actors such as crack-heads doing life that refer to him as a ''minor actor'' attempting to defame His mighty name,character and super star status.

Chuck Norris will be coming to your town ''on location'' soon so katy bar the fuck'in door.

Chuck Norris is like santa clause.

Chuck Norris knows who's been naughty and who's been stashing shit in the basement.

Chuck Norris will snap your neck like a two cent pencil if you ask for his autograph while he is trying to read you your rights.

Chuck Norris will drown you in a urnial at a honkytonk if you are standing beside him taking a leak and look over at him and say,''Hey your Chuck Norris aren't you!''? and then look over at his massive tool with dilated pupils and a white powdery substance caked on your mustache.

Chuck Norris like Eddie Murphy is ''the new sheriff in town''.

Chuck Norris does not need no stinking badges.

Chuck Norris is a real American Badass.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 10:27:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By glock23carry:
I'm not a lawyer, but:

"The jury found me guilty of one count of conspiracy. Later, I was sentenced to life in prison."

Does anyone else find that sentence a bit strange? Conspiracy = life? I think not.

G



Yeah, you generally have to earn life in prison.



Yep. Criminals lie. Funny story from when I was in law school. One of my classmates (a female) got this sob story from a guy who was also run over by the system. He had a similar song and dance, and was writing his own appeal but wanted someone to put his story into a format a court would read. My friend took the case, but later did a search in the sex offender registry. Turns out that he was convicted of multiple counts of rape and sexual assault, including "forced sodomy."



But under the ethical rules she was pretty much committed to representing the scumbag, so she had to write an appeal for a serial rapist. She was less than amused. I bet she's a good republican now.

Link Posted: 12/29/2005 10:33:59 AM EDT
Chuck Norris needs to be kicked in the nutz.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 10:35:22 AM EDT
It was a pretty weak case (no physical evidence, just the testimony of stooges), and the sentence does seem a bit harsh considering her prior record.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 12:34:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By imposter:
It was a pretty weak case (no physical evidence, just the testimony of stooges), and the sentence does seem a bit harsh considering her prior record.



I saw a piece on this town recently. Alot of the "drug dealers" were given new trials and released. The local PD was creating criminals based on the word of a bad snitch and a couple cowboy cops.


ckmorley
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 10:49:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CKMorley:

Originally Posted By imposter:
It was a pretty weak case (no physical evidence, just the testimony of stooges), and the sentence does seem a bit harsh considering her prior record.



I saw a piece on this town recently. Alot of the "drug dealers" were given new trials and released. The local PD was creating criminals based on the word of a bad snitch and a couple cowboy cops.

ckmorley



Chuck NORRIS will be paying you a visit soon....I would get my affairs together if I were you....seldom does a man question the veracity of the actions of Chuck NORRIS and live to tell the tale or not spend the rest of his natural life in prison on trumped up drug charges!!!
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 10:56:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 10:57:32 PM EDT
Sounds like a bunch of scumbags were tossed in the pen.

I always liked Chuck, now I like him even more.

PS You dont get life without evidence AND having commited very serious crimes. Hell even killers dont get life any more.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 11:13:31 PM EDT
That's because Chuck Norris doesn't care about black people.


/sarcasm off.

Actually I was laughing so hard during the article I could barely type. She's in jail where she belongs.
You do the crime you do the time. And I seriously doubt she 'just offered to help' and got life. Sounds like a 3rd strike to me.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 11:15:38 PM EDT
Bitch is damned lucky all she got was life in prison and didn't get her ass whupped by Chuck and Nia Peeples!!!
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 11:18:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/29/2005 11:19:27 PM EDT by J_Smith]
Does Chuckee Cheese still volunteer for NAMBLA??

Chuck Norris Fans - you're gayer then Sylvester Stallone at a Dancing Convention.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 11:24:59 PM EDT
I'm having a hard time believing that a conviction for conspiracy got her a life sentence. I wonder...could she be leaving something out?
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 11:25:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/29/2005 11:30:54 PM EDT by lonegunman]
I like the part where he does not see a problem with helping crack dealers who are down on their luck, find other crack dealers so they can raise money for their defense,,,,,,,since well.... They are charged with crack dealing and don't want to do to jail.

Maybe next time he'll hang up the phone before he does something stupid.

For two years I lived across the street from a rental full of meth heads. It took an amazing amount of effort to get rid of them. My local police department seemed to be on their payroll or at least unwilling to arrest their friends. I'm sure if I lived in a town full of crack smoking, crack dealing and crack related crime AND THE POLICE WERE WILLING TO DO SOMETHING, I'd want to send their asses to the nearest jail forever.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 11:43:45 PM EDT

Terrell police didn't say whether the 47-year-old Norris got to roundhouse kick the suspect in the face.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 12:07:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By u-baddog:
Does TX have a 3rd strike and your out law ?



Need a lawyer to clarify, but I think Texas has it down to two.
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