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Posted: 12/23/2005 4:09:41 AM EDT
It is 21degrees in Century, FL right down the road from where I live here in the North West Florida. I guess that's what happens when there is Global Warming. It's colder than most of the north today.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 4:14:56 AM EDT
Its the shifting of the global ocean currents. People dont realize that the atmosphere has very little to do with climatic shifts. The air only reacts to what is happening below. A reveral of the deep ocean currents will make an ice age a reality.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 4:16:55 AM EDT
Global warming causes temperature fluctuations and uncommon weather. If you look at the overall picture then you see it.
2004 was the warmest year on record, before that 2003 was.

Waking up to an unseasonally cool day is NOT proof there is no global warming!
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 4:22:04 AM EDT
High-density salty, cold waters that sink into the water column from the Polar Regions power the ocean currents. This downward movement draws warm surface water from the equatorial regions to the poles and thus creates a current (the Gulf Stream being a notable example of this phenomenon). As the warm equatorial waters flow northward, they provide warmer waters and create milder climates along the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe. The cold, oxygen-rich polar water makes its way along the ocean’s depths to be eventually forced up by ocean upwellings to the surface in more temperate zones. As this stream of water rises up through the water column, it transports vast amounts of nutrients from the ocean floor. While organisms in the deep ocean rely on oxygen supplied from the sinking water, everything from blue whales to sea birds depend on the upwelling of the now-nutrient rich water for their existence.
Melting glaciers and sea-ice resulting from global warming have the potential to dump an enormous amount of freshwater into the North Atlantic, reducing these waters’ salinity and density. This water will not sink into the saltier water from the equatorial region, thus bringing the world’s ocean conveyor system to a halt. Aside from the obvious impacts on the ocean’s food chain and oxygen supply, the climatic changes that may develop from this scenario would have a dramatic effect on our environment. With a weakened, or absent, Gulf Stream, the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe will have much colder climates than they have now. Additionally, the normally cold Pacific coast may be locked in a perpetual warm, El Nino-type ocean pattern, resulting in the destruction of local fisheries as well as creating harsh weather conditions throughout the world.


Link Posted: 12/23/2005 4:33:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By llanero:
High-density salty, cold waters that sink into the water column from the Polar Regions power the ocean currents. This downward movement draws warm surface water from the equatorial regions to the poles and thus creates a current (the Gulf Stream being a notable example of this phenomenon). As the warm equatorial waters flow northward, they provide warmer waters and create milder climates along the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe. The cold, oxygen-rich polar water makes its way along the ocean’s depths to be eventually forced up by ocean upwellings to the surface in more temperate zones. As this stream of water rises up through the water column, it transports vast amounts of nutrients from the ocean floor. While organisms in the deep ocean rely on oxygen supplied from the sinking water, everything from blue whales to sea birds depend on the upwelling of the now-nutrient rich water for their existence.
Melting glaciers and sea-ice resulting from global warming have the potential to dump an enormous amount of freshwater into the North Atlantic, reducing these waters’ salinity and density. This water will not sink into the saltier water from the equatorial region, thus bringing the world’s ocean conveyor system to a halt. Aside from the obvious impacts on the ocean’s food chain and oxygen supply, the climatic changes that may develop from this scenario would have a dramatic effect on our environment. With a weakened, or absent, Gulf Stream, the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe will have much colder climates than they have now. Additionally, the normally cold Pacific coast may be locked in a perpetual warm, El Nino-type ocean pattern, resulting in the destruction of local fisheries as well as creating harsh weather conditions throughout the world.





Link Posted: 12/23/2005 4:49:50 AM EDT
It is GW's freeze machine thingy at work!
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 4:52:20 AM EDT
You have to remember that everything today is blamed on global warming. The fact that Antarctica is colder and the Greenland glaciers are thickening are blamed on global warming. A few years ago the mild hurricane seasons caused by El Nino were blamed on global warming, now the active hurricane seasons are blamed on it. You ought to pick up Michael Critchton's State of Fear, it's a very good read.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 4:53:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By llanero:
High-density salty, cold waters that sink into the water column from the Polar Regions power the ocean currents. This downward movement draws warm surface water from the equatorial regions to the poles and thus creates a current (the Gulf Stream being a notable example of this phenomenon). As the warm equatorial waters flow northward, they provide warmer waters and create milder climates along the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe. The cold, oxygen-rich polar water makes its way along the ocean’s depths to be eventually forced up by ocean upwellings to the surface in more temperate zones. As this stream of water rises up through the water column, it transports vast amounts of nutrients from the ocean floor. While organisms in the deep ocean rely on oxygen supplied from the sinking water, everything from blue whales to sea birds depend on the upwelling of the now-nutrient rich water for their existence.
Melting glaciers and sea-ice resulting from global warming have the potential to dump an enormous amount of freshwater into the North Atlantic, reducing these waters’ salinity and density. This water will not sink into the saltier water from the equatorial region, thus bringing the world’s ocean conveyor system to a halt. Aside from the obvious impacts on the ocean’s food chain and oxygen supply, the climatic changes that may develop from this scenario would have a dramatic effect on our environment. With a weakened, or absent, Gulf Stream, the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe will have much colder climates than they have now. Additionally, the normally cold Pacific coast may be locked in a perpetual warm, El Nino-type ocean pattern, resulting in the destruction of local fisheries as well as creating harsh weather conditions throughout the world.







See, Dennis Quaid was right after all.


But Russell Crowe still stole Meg Ryan.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 4:58:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SMProud:
You have to remember that everything today is blamed on global warming. The fact that Antarctica is colder and the Greenland glaciers are thickening are blamed on global warming. A few years ago the mild hurricane seasons caused by El Nino were blamed on global warming, now the active hurricane seasons are blamed on it. You ought to pick up Michael Critchton's State of Fear, it's a very good read.


+1,000,000

EVERYTHING is blamed on global warming. When it's hotter than normal, it's global warming. When it's colder than normal, it's global warming.

Link Posted: 12/23/2005 5:03:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By llanero:
High-density salty, cold waters that sink into the water column from the Polar Regions power the ocean currents. This downward movement draws warm surface water from the equatorial regions to the poles and thus creates a current (the Gulf Stream being a notable example of this phenomenon). As the warm equatorial waters flow northward, they provide warmer waters and create milder climates along the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe. The cold, oxygen-rich polar water makes its way along the ocean’s depths to be eventually forced up by ocean upwellings to the surface in more temperate zones. As this stream of water rises up through the water column, it transports vast amounts of nutrients from the ocean floor. While organisms in the deep ocean rely on oxygen supplied from the sinking water, everything from blue whales to sea birds depend on the upwelling of the now-nutrient rich water for their existence.
Melting glaciers and sea-ice resulting from global warming have the potential to dump an enormous amount of freshwater into the North Atlantic, reducing these waters’ salinity and density. This water will not sink into the saltier water from the equatorial region, thus bringing the world’s ocean conveyor system to a halt. Aside from the obvious impacts on the ocean’s food chain and oxygen supply, the climatic changes that may develop from this scenario would have a dramatic effect on our environment. With a weakened, or absent, Gulf Stream, the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe will have much colder climates than they have now. Additionally, the normally cold Pacific coast may be locked in a perpetual warm, El Nino-type ocean pattern, resulting in the destruction of local fisheries as well as creating harsh weather conditions throughout the world.





I really did not like this movie when it came out, I really don't need to get a summary here on AR-15.com.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 5:06:49 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 5:37:25 AM EDT
Yeah it looks real funny now. But wait until we have to go to the North Pole to get watermelons!! It won't be so funny then will it!! Old folks will be moving back to NY. You damn capitalist pigs....die and leave the world alone!
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 5:45:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:29:01 AM EDT
Yes. It is global warming. The first sign of global warming is global cooling.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:33:22 AM EDT
In the 60s and early 70s, the word was we were headed for another ice age.

Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:35:07 AM EDT
Its almost all the way down to 65 here, I cant wait for the sun to come out so I can go to the beach. Cold is a bitch!
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:35:52 AM EDT


Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:36:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WolfFox:
It is 21degrees in Century, FL right down the road from where I live here in the North West Florida. I guess that's what happens when there is Global Warming. It's colder than most of the north today.



Holy shit it's winter and it's warmer in Wisconsin then in Fla...
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:38:29 AM EDT
My understanding of the climate shift is that we are actually headed for an ice age, possibly and echo of the Little Ice Age from 1250 to about 1850 AD.

Apparently some scientists are not letting the facts upset a good story, or more grant money..

Ops
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:45:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/23/2005 6:49:08 AM EDT by warlord]

Originally Posted By SMProud:
You have to remember that everything today is blamed on global warming. The fact that Antarctica is colder and the Greenland glaciers are thickening are blamed on global warming. A few years ago the mild hurricane seasons caused by El Nino were blamed on global warming, now the active hurricane seasons are blamed on it. You ought to pick up Michael Critchton's State of Fear, it's a very good read.


Is that what happened in the movie The Day After Tomorrow (2004)

Here in flat lands of Los Angeles, Calif, we're currently at 55F, and heading for a high in the lower 70s, that is global warming.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 6:52:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ops:
My understanding of the climate shift is that we are actually headed for an ice age, possibly and echo of the Little Ice Age from 1250 to about 1850 AD.

Apparently some scientists are not letting the facts upset a good story, or more grant money..

Ops



I seen a thing on the "mini ice-age" thing that happened about 700 years ago on the History channel. They said that the entire New England area including the New York City area, was under 3 feet of snow in July; and you (if you were there) could walk across the frozen water to Manhatten.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 10:41:10 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 11:03:54 AM EDT
Austin, Texas here. I was just putting out more Christmas lights. In shorts and t-shirt. I was sweating.



Fucking Texas....My family in NJ are freezing their balls off and having a PROPER winter. ...Course, they ARE still in NJ, so I think I got the better end of this deal.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 11:05:04 AM EDT
Its damn near 60 here.

It should be about 30-35
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 7:30:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By banthony1:

Originally Posted By llanero:
High-density salty, cold waters that sink into the water column from the Polar Regions power the ocean currents. This downward movement draws warm surface water from the equatorial regions to the poles and thus creates a current (the Gulf Stream being a notable example of this phenomenon). As the warm equatorial waters flow northward, they provide warmer waters and create milder climates along the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe. The cold, oxygen-rich polar water makes its way along the ocean’s depths to be eventually forced up by ocean upwellings to the surface in more temperate zones. As this stream of water rises up through the water column, it transports vast amounts of nutrients from the ocean floor. While organisms in the deep ocean rely on oxygen supplied from the sinking water, everything from blue whales to sea birds depend on the upwelling of the now-nutrient rich water for their existence.
Melting glaciers and sea-ice resulting from global warming have the potential to dump an enormous amount of freshwater into the North Atlantic, reducing these waters’ salinity and density. This water will not sink into the saltier water from the equatorial region, thus bringing the world’s ocean conveyor system to a halt. Aside from the obvious impacts on the ocean’s food chain and oxygen supply, the climatic changes that may develop from this scenario would have a dramatic effect on our environment. With a weakened, or absent, Gulf Stream, the Eastern Seaboard and Northern Europe will have much colder climates than they have now. Additionally, the normally cold Pacific coast may be locked in a perpetual warm, El Nino-type ocean pattern, resulting in the destruction of local fisheries as well as creating harsh weather conditions throughout the world.





I really did not like this movie when it came out, I really don't need to get a summary here on AR-15.com.



Hey! No need to mock! That little 300-word blurb helped me get an "A" in my Ocean Resources class a couple of semesters ago!
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 9:05:26 PM EDT
It was over 60 tonight at 9 when I went to pick up my kid.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 9:07:09 PM EDT
I dont know what the temp was today, but I was running around all day with a short sleeved sweatshirt, and it was kind of warm for it
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