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Posted: 12/16/2005 10:40:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2005 1:13:56 AM EDT by cobracommand]
Obviously there is a great divide between basic competency and expert craftsmanship which comes from years or decades of experience but how should an enthusiast pursue working with firearms as a trade?

ETA: I messed up the poll options... the last option should be "Other/I don't know but I want to see the poll results"
Link Posted: 12/16/2005 11:29:06 PM EDT
I'de think a trade school with a gunsmithing course if available would be the best way. I'm not sure how good any mail order one would be, but I have never taken either, so what do I know??
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:36:15 AM EDT
become a apprentice, learn the ways of the force
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 3:59:18 AM EDT
I'd say trade school, followed by apprenticeship. Take the book/lab type learning and then apply it with someone who has been doing it for a while. Like anything else, you will pick up stuff not taught in a classroom that pays more attention to detail.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 4:03:45 AM EDT
I'd love to be a gunsmith/armorer.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 5:12:39 AM EDT
They are hatched from eggs in far remote lands.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 5:35:55 AM EDT
+1 Fat McNasty. Charles the Gunsmith.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:24:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By smokycity:
I'd say trade school, followed by apprenticeship. Take the book/lab type learning and then apply it with someone who has been doing it for a while. Like anything else, you will pick up stuff not taught in a classroom that pays more attention to detail.



This seems the most logical path for someone like myself, since I have no shop experience past Jr. High and no actual metalwork skills.

According to this article(1997), there are two accredited private schools in the US:

Colorado School of Trades and Pennsylvania Gunsmith School.
The article also says there are nine public colleges and technical schools that offer programs.
So far, I've found detailed info on Yavapai College, which offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Gunsmithing (2yr). The thing that caught my eye on that one was that they offer two levels of engraving as well CNC/CAD and I'm interested in the artistan aspect of smithing as well as fabrication/repair. I am still looking for information on other schools/programs.

According to the article, average (1997) F/T earnings for gunsmiths is in the 18K-40K range, which means FAR less than where I'm at now and is somewhat discouraging but then again I've gotten used to the SoCal costs of living, so my perception of a livable income is pretty skewed. However, It's not a path I'd be persuing for the money but I don't want to spend my days mounting scopes between runs to the local food bank either.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:25:59 PM EDT
I know they run classes on becoming certified AR/M-16 armorers. Where? I don't know.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:26:10 PM EDT
Most of them must come from butcher shops.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:27:09 PM EDT
they come from ace hardware armed with steel punches, claw hammers and mexican milling machines err, dremel tools!
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:27:16 PM EDT
2 parts brains. 2 parts guts. 1 part love.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:32:36 PM EDT
Failed car mechanics
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:32:46 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:39:24 PM EDT
Pakistan...
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:47:29 PM EDT
When I was a kid there was a correspondence school that would advertise on TV, with Sally Struthers reading the list of classes. One of them was gun repair.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 12:50:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By deej86:
I know they run classes on becoming certified AR/M-16 armorers. Where? I don't know.



know manufacturers offer armorer classes, but I surmise there'd be initial qualifications tho.
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