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Posted: 12/8/2003 6:34:50 PM EDT
I'm about to buy a new pair of hunting boots. I'll probably go with Danners or Matterhorns (Goretex is a must), but what I don't know is how much insulation to get. I'll be wearing them in the winter (rarely under 10F) but would also like to wear them in the spring and fall. Should I go with 200g Thinsulate and wear heavier socks in the cold? If I go with 600g or 800g will that be too warm when it's warmer than 50F?
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 6:36:59 PM EDT
If you sit still go heavier, if you'll be moving about, lighter will do.
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 7:03:24 PM EDT
I have two pairs of Wolverines both with the Gortex liners one pair with 600g thinsulate. They are great when out in the cold and snow but for inside work ( I wear boots daily and for the most part work inside ) they are too much. My new pair are the 200g versions and they seem to work better for me, we haven't had very cold weather yet. At least my feet don't sweat while inside. If you are only using them for hunting and will be sitting in a blind get the 600g.
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 7:17:31 PM EDT
I've got a pair of 800gram/goretex hunting boots. They're nice if you're still hunting and even tromping around. I used to have a pair of 600's but found they didn't quite keep my feet warm enough if I was sitting. The 800's did the trick. One thing I do is wear polypropylene sock liners which wick away moisture and help to keep your feet dry. I use the liner and switch between a light, medium weight or a heavy weight sock depending on the temp.
Link Posted: 12/9/2003 5:46:40 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ovrtym: I've got a pair of 800gram/goretex hunting boots. They're nice if you're still hunting and even tromping around. I used to have a pair of 600's but found they didn't quite keep my feet warm enough if I was sitting. The 800's did the trick. One thing I do is wear polypropylene sock liners which wick away moisture and help to keep your feet dry. I use the liner and switch between a light, medium weight or a heavy weight sock depending on the temp.
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I've had the exact same experience. The 600s are great for cold weather (25 - 40 degrees) and walking around. But if you're ever going to be sitting in 25 degree and below, they won't do well. YOu will want the 800s, or atleast some serious quality insulate socks to help. But, in 50 degree weather those 600's will sweat you out on the walk in and out big time.
Link Posted: 12/9/2003 5:49:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/9/2003 5:51:15 AM EDT by StariVojnik]
Get the 1000g/gortex for supercold conditions/hunting. Normal boots start at 400g I believe.
Link Posted: 12/9/2003 9:42:06 AM EDT
I once had a pair of Timberland Iditarod boots with 800g Thinsulate. Even in Michigan winters, they were hot and bulky. I gave them to my brother for use while snowmobiling. He sits a lot, but the engine really heated up those boots. 400g is good with the right socks, if you're on the move.
Link Posted: 12/9/2003 9:49:11 AM EDT
I bought a pair of Browning hunting boots at Galyan's on-sale. They have 800 grams of Thinsulate, which is a good "all-purpose" boot amount. Not too much that you can't wear them in warmer weather, and enough to keep you warm, except in the COLDEST weather.
Link Posted: 12/9/2003 9:57:22 AM EDT
You have to decide what is correct for you. I can tell you that walking for an extended period in insulated boots wiil make your feet sweat, then your socks get damp. When you stop walking your feet will get cold even if you have 800 gram boots on. (unless you change your socks) As a rule, I wear uninsulated boots (with ultimax socks) to hike in down to about 20*, then I go to a 400 gram boot. If you're not really walking in them, then go for more insulation.
Link Posted: 12/9/2003 5:21:29 PM EDT
So for maximum versatility, it sounds like I should go with a 200g to 400g, unless I will be sitting in the cold. I don't expect to be sitting much at all, so I'll go look for a lightweight pair this weekend. Thanks for all of the replies.
Link Posted: 12/9/2003 5:29:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Clay-More: I bought a pair of Browning hunting boots at Galyan's on-sale. They have 800 grams of Thinsulate, which is a good "all-purpose" boot amount. Not too much that you can't wear them in warmer weather, and enough to keep you warm, except in the COLDEST weather.
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Last season I purchased a pair of Browning Mountain 1000s. I wore them for the first week of the deer hunt. During the second week, the sole on the left boot (Goodyear bobbed sole) became separated from the boot. I contacted Browning, they said I could send them back but, he (customer service) claimed it was likely abuse to cause this to happen. Yeah, abuse, I put my foot in the damn boot. I shall never purchase another Browning product (which I did regularly, four in one jackets etc.).
Link Posted: 12/9/2003 5:36:12 PM EDT
ZERO NADA ZILCH You don't need ANY insulation in Danners. I elk hunted in 1.5 feet of snow at 0 to -5 with a pair of Arcadias with 1 pair of smartwool socks and my feet NEVER GOT COLD IN A WEEK OF HUNTING!!! Their older boots didn't have such a good lining and required a little insulation (I still wear them but they arn't the boot of the Arcadia). And I wear them in the hot Arizona desert in the summer and my feet are still comfy!
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