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Posted: 6/29/2003 9:42:27 AM EDT
I had the good fortune of meeting a very nice, intelligent girl this weekend who I plan on seeing again. Turns out she's Canadian and has been working in the U.S. for about 8yrs and owns a home here. In the course of conversation, I asked her about her residency status and had kind of assumed in the back of my mind that she had some kind of dual citizenship/permanent residence status. Turns out she only has a "green" (which is really pink in color, I was told) card. To be honest, I know very, very little about immigration laws and the various levels of immigration status. Three levels that I am aware of are the common "green card" which I am under the impression is the least "solid" forms of residency...then there's permanent resident and also dual citizenship. I'm sure there's more. In any case, when I found out she had not yet became a US citizen after living here for so long, for some reason my initial thought was "why the hell not" and has been in the back of my mind when I think about her. I guess I really am an enthnocentric American. So...can anyone give me a quick lesson on immigration? Any disadvantages to her, as a Canadian, for not pursuing citizenship in the US? Furthermore, am I being a freak for questioning her non-citizenship after she has lived here all these years? I kinda think I am without knowing much of immigration laws or her reasons for simply keeping a "green card." I did not pursue the citizenship status issue as I had intentions of pursuing other..."issues"...shall we say... Thank you for your time.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 9:50:42 AM EDT
Canadian girlfriend. Suuuuure.... [rolleyes]
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 9:53:30 AM EDT
There's people who've lived in the US all their lives & stayed on the Green Card & never became citizens, for whatever reasons. As a US Citizen, it pisses me off someone would stay here & not become a citizen.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 9:59:57 AM EDT
Okay okay...I should have seen the "Candadian Girlfriend" sterotype coming a mile away. Got me there. Good one. [url]http://www.theonion.com/onion3619/canadian_girlfriend.html[/url] So, whether she's a figment of my imagination or not, still interested in feedback. And, no, her name is not "Rosie" you jackasses.... [spank] [sex] [bounce][LOL]
Originally Posted By raven: Canadian girlfriend. Suuuuure.... [rolleyes]
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Link Posted: 6/29/2003 10:23:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/29/2003 10:26:31 AM EDT by DriftPunch]
Because there's no real benefit to it for the average person. -So you can't vote, most don't anyway as evidenced by turnout counts. -So you can't buy an Assault Rifle (Apparently, resident aliens can own other types, but not these. I'm not sure if handguns are a no-no or not.), most people don't own one anyway. Otherwise, there is little motivation for a resident alien to become a citizen. In fact, there is a reason not to as, depending on your source country, you may have to renounce your country of origins citizenship. I'm not sure if Canada allows dual citizenship. From our perspective, this is not big deal (as we're best anyway[bow]), but imagine if you moved to Canada, and someone asked you to renounce your US citizenship.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 10:27:05 AM EDT
I heard it isnt that easy to become a citizen? you have to apply for it and go to interviews, get mug shots, finger printed, lots of waiting, it can take anywhere from one to five years to get your citizenship? it's a slow process.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 10:31:28 AM EDT
Thunderbolt 6/29/2003 2:27:05 PM but imagine if you moved to Canada, and someone asked you to renounce your US citizenship.[quote/] "Why would i wanna go to America Junior when I live in America"~~~~Homer Simpson (speaking of visting Ontario Canada)
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 10:57:43 AM EDT
if she's had her green card for five years, she can apply for citizenship on her own if she wants. It's not necessary though, since a green card holder can stay here permanently.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 11:04:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By raven: Canadian girlfriend. Suuuuure.... [rolleyes]
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You said it. Being so close to canada there were always guys in highschool and Jr. high who would have girlfriends, but they lived in canada. Good times, good times.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 11:06:07 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog: I had the good fortune of meeting a very nice, intelligent girl...
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OK, you really had me going there. I was ready to believe it, until you opened your mouth and this gem falls out:
Turns out she's Canadian
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And that, my friend, is just too much to believe, taken as a whole. Oxymoron alert! [lol][rofl] Just funning you. [beer] CJ
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 12:06:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/29/2003 12:15:41 PM EDT by captainpooby]
If she has been a legal permanent resident for 5 years she can become a citizen. The process takes about a year and not much different than getting the green card. You do have to take a test on American history and speaking english. You get sworn in by a judge at the end. The only real advantage is you get to vote and hold an American passport. If voting is important to you thats good. If you have a Canadian passport its a push. It also opens up a few jobs like LEO and Mil. and civil service. A legal perm. res. can buy any guns legal to own in the state he lives in. You only become a "dual citizen" by default. There is no such thing really, you are either Canadian or American. Used to the US made you give up your previous citizenship but now they dont. edited to say: Aint nuthin wrong with Canadian girls. I've had quite few of 'em. They taste great! Remember, the Canadian National animal is the beaver!
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 12:25:04 PM EDT
I thought you didn't pay taxes (Income, SS)--not sure about the State/Local (property, sales) but the Fed Stuff. Keeping an extra 10-15% or more of your earned income might be a reason not to become a Citizen. AFARR
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 12:27:15 PM EDT
Originally Posted By AFARR: I thought you didn't pay taxes (Income, SS)--not sure about the State/Local (property, sales) but the Fed Stuff. Keeping an extra 10-15% or more of your earned income might be a reason not to become a Citizen. AFARR
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nope, if they work, they pay all taxes just like the rest of us.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 12:29:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/29/2003 12:29:31 PM EDT by Wolfpack]
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 12:30:50 PM EDT
Why am I the first one to demand pics? PICS DAGGUMMIT!!!
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 12:40:11 PM EDT
I certainly paid my share last year.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 4:21:05 PM EDT
Are girls from canada hot? You got any pics?
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 5:34:23 PM EDT
I've been married to a Canadian for almost 21 years. Shelley has the pink green card also. My wife has no intention of ever becoming an American because she likes being a Canadian and thinks it would be unloyal or something to that nature. Other than the obvious the draw backs are...it is a bitch sometimes going through customs and the inheritance laws are worse than bad. Canadians make good wifes and are good breeding stock. I go to Vancouver Island about twice a year and constantly find extreamly cute girls that are so friendly it's unreal,no attitudes at all.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 5:40:56 PM EDT
...and do you know what a Canadian Girl's favorite position is? Doggy style, so she can watch the hockey game too, eh!
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 5:44:35 PM EDT
Mechandy, show your wife this thread: [url]http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=171799&w=searchPop[/url]
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 6:07:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GunnyG: ...and do you know what a Canadian Girl's favorite position is? Doggy style, so she can watch the hockey game too, eh!
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[ROFL2]
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 6:34:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/29/2003 6:36:30 PM EDT by GreatGunsAZ]
US does not allow dual citizenship but other countries do. People from other countries must denounce their citizenship for the other country to become a US citizen. Then they can go back to the country that allows dual citizenship and become a citizen again. So the US will not be second fiddle to any other country. Kinda like Home mortgages US want to be the primary lender. Now AT LEAST SHE IS NOT AN ILLEGAL ALIEN!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 6:52:47 PM EDT
Stay the hell away from our Womenz~~
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 7:13:27 PM EDT
Green card == permanent resident. I have known Canadians who took a long time to become US citizens if they ever did. There can be tax and inheritance issues in some cases. Also Canadian citizenship might make it easier to get a visa to live/work in the UK and other Commonwealth nations. GunLvr
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 7:16:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/29/2003 7:18:32 PM EDT by captainpooby]
Greatguns you are wrong. Look it up. edited to say: I am a Canadian green card holder and I DO know the rules.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 7:26:23 PM EDT
Don't some canadians keep their citizenship so they can continue to partake of the free health care? I know a guy who did this while living in the US. I guess they eventually found out what he was doing and cut him off.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 7:39:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/29/2003 7:46:38 PM EDT by TRW]
I'm sure she is hesitant to become a citizen of the U.S. of A., because some day she may want to return to the sheltering arms of socialism north of the border. Does she look anything like this little tyke? [img]http://members.aol.com:/zmurgist/graphics/ike.gif[/img]
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 7:48:38 PM EDT
Having a green card isn't a "least solid" kind of thing. Once you get one you're pretty much set. The only thing different from a citizen is probably voting and LEO/Gov jobs.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 7:51:10 PM EDT
Damn...Maybe she might give you her phone number sometime! Then you can go on dates... maybe fall in love with each other, and [red]THEN[/red] think about marriage!
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 7:51:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/29/2003 7:52:10 PM EDT by Wolfpack]
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 7:57:18 PM EDT
This is Mrs. Mechandy. Thank's for the link captainpooby - I find myself feeling this way about America too. And yes, I speak English and not only have learned some American History as I went to highschool here, but have learned much more with my children as they are learning it in school. I not only know the American Anthom, but sing along whenever it's played and feel the goosebumps as the meaning of the words sink in - everytime I hear it. I was at an event this weekend where a teenage girl (American) refused to stand for the National Anthom and Pledge of Allegiance. I was angry at her for her lack of respect for this great country and pissed off at her parents for not teaching her that respect. But there's still a part of me that is Canadian and pround to be. It's a beautiful country with wonderful people. The education system is much better, the children (in general) more respectful, and although the economy sucks, she takes care of her people. I want to be able to go back and live or retire if I so choose because it's a beautiful country. If I give up my citizenship, that may not be a possible option. (And not for the free healthcare because I haven't paid into it). My entire family is in Canada, but America is home. Oh, and the doggy style is not to watch hockey but for a better view of the porno. Mrs. Mechandy
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 8:10:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/29/2003 8:11:22 PM EDT by Nimrod1193]
Originally Posted By DriftPunch: Because there's no real benefit to it for the average person. -So you can't vote, most don't anyway as evidenced by turnout counts. -So you can't buy an Assault Rifle (Apparently, resident aliens can own other types, but not these. I'm not sure if handguns are a no-no or not.), most people don't own one anyway. Otherwise, there is little motivation for a resident alien to become a citizen. In fact, there is a reason not to as, depending on your source country, you may have to renounce your country of origins citizenship. I'm not sure if Canada allows dual citizenship. From our perspective, this is not big deal (as we're best anyway[bow]), but imagine if you moved to Canada, and someone asked you to renounce your US citizenship.
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Actually, there is one rather large downside. If you are convicted of a serious crime and you are a citizen, you do your time and then get on with your life. If you are not a citizen, you do your time and then are removed from the country and invited never to return. Case in point; we had a 22-year old locked up for distribution of methamphetamine. His family had emigrated from Mexico (legally) when he was three, but for some reason, he never became a citizen (he had permanent resident status.) After he finishes his four year stretch for his drug conviction, he will be deported to Mexico. If he returns to the U.S. without permission, it is a ten year felony. And now for the punchline...[b]he doesn't speak a word of Spanish[/b]. Sucks to be him.
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 11:43:25 PM EDT
Its because the Canadians have problems with the language test -eh. The US does not recognize dual-citizenships except in very limited circumstances. I've run into this a few times when applying for clearances for naturalized citizens and then having problems because the person has not renounced other citizenship, still holds a valid foreign passport, or some other similar reason pops up.
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 12:24:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By raven: Canadian girlfriend. Suuuuure.... [rolleyes]
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LMAO
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 1:26:46 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TRW: I'm sure she is hesitant to become a citizen of the U.S. of A., because some day she may want to return to the sheltering arms of socialism north of the border. Does she look anything like this little tyke? [img]http://members.aol.com:/zmurgist/graphics/ike.gif[/img]
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[LOL]
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 2:01:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GreatGunsAZ: US does not allow dual citizenship but other countries do. People from other countries must denounce their citizenship for the other country to become a US citizen. Then they can go back to the country that allows dual citizenship and become a citizen again. So the US will not be second fiddle to any other country. Kinda like Home mortgages US want to be the primary lender. Now AT LEAST SHE IS NOT AN ILLEGAL ALIEN!!!!!!!
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The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own citizenship laws based on its own policy.Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. citizen parents may be both a U.S. citizen and a citizen of the country of birth. A U.S. citizen may acquire foreign citizenship by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth.U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship. Intent can be shown by the person's statements or conduct.The U.S. Government recognizes that dual nationality exists but does not encourage it as a matter of policy because of the problems it may cause. Claims of other countries on dual national U.S. citizens may conflict with U.S. law, and dual nationality may limit U.S. Government efforts to assist citizens abroad. The country where a dual national is located generally has a stronger claim to that person's allegiance. However, dual nationals owe allegiance to both the United States and the foreign country. They are required to obey the laws of both countries. Either country has the right to enforce its laws, particularly if the person later travels there.Most U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. Dual nationals may also be required by the foreign country to use its passport to enter and leave that country. Use of the foreign passport does not endanger U.S. citizenship.Most countries permit a person to renounce or otherwise lose citizenship. Information on losing foreign citizenship can be obtained from the foreign country's embassy and consulates in the United States. Americans can renounce U.S. citizenship in the proper form at U.S. embassies and consulates abroad. [url]http://travel.state.gov/dualnationality.html[/url]
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