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Posted: 6/24/2003 6:28:36 AM EDT
With the travel season here what are your tips for increasing gas milage. Do you know they actually work or is it just what someone told you? Does fuel injector cleaner provide any benefit since most gas today contain some sort of cleaner already? I've heard increasing tire pressure will improve MPH. I haven't verified if this works.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:30:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/24/2003 6:31:25 AM EDT by Belfry_Express]
Turn off your AC, run in high gear, dont accelerate quickly, disable your power steering and change your avitor. I did all that and I can get up to 30 MPG out of my '68 mustang.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:42:41 AM EDT
Run tires at their correct pressure. Keep your foot out of the carburetor. Drive the speed limit.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:47:29 AM EDT
Ride your bike and work off your fat ass! [:D] Your car will get better mileage too, carrying less weight.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:48:52 AM EDT
Overinflating your tires will probably increase gas mileage by reducing the rolling resistance. But, it will cause uneven tire wear and increased tire wear in the middle of the tread. Any gas savings would be offset by tire replacement. "I've heard increasing tire pressure will improve MPH. I haven't verified if this works." BTW, I think you mean MPG.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:50:48 AM EDT
For improved highway mileage just slow down a bit. I get 24 (according to the car's computer) at 70-75 mph. If I drop to 60, it'll do 27. Yes, with A/C on and power steering operational. Tires to correct pressure always. They'll give you better mileage and will last longer, a lot longer.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:53:55 AM EDT
Don't drive like me. [:D]
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:54:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By m193: Overinflating your tires will probably increase gas mileage by reducing the rolling resistance. But, it will cause uneven tire wear and increased tire wear in the middle of the tread. Any gas savings would be offset by tire replacement. "I've heard increasing tire pressure will improve MPH. I haven't verified if this works." BTW, I think you mean MPG.
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Yes MPG is what I meant. Not completely with it this morning. As for the tires, there is usually a range of pressure such as 42-44. Also most of the times I have checked the oil change place usually has them around 35. So going up to the max of 44, might make a difference. Part of the problem with the exploding tires on the Explorer was people not checking the pressure and other shops setting the pressure too low. So if nothing else, it's just a good reminder to check your tire pressure even if it won't really improve gas milage.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:56:23 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:56:40 AM EDT
On pickup trucks I have heard that driving with your tail gate down will improve gas milage. Does anyone know if this is true? Personally I think it looks kind of stupid to drive with the tail gate down unless you have something too long for the truck bed. What about covers for a truck bed. The manufacturers make claims that it will improve gas milage but do they really?
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:58:21 AM EDT
Put the tranny in Neutral and only drive downhill.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:59:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SWIRE: On pickup trucks I have heard that driving with your tail gate down will improve gas milage. Does anyone know if this is true? Personally I think it looks kind of stupid to drive with the tail gate down unless you have something too long for the truck bed. What about covers for a truck bed. The manufacturers make claims that it will improve gas milage but do they really?
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The tailgate thing does work. Its all areodynamics. I would go for a cover to really lower viscious flow over your truck. But a tailgate up does cause alot of turbulence = drag = you gotta use more gas.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 7:02:57 AM EDT
Don't haul around any unnecessary weight such as a heavy tool box.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 7:04:28 AM EDT
The tonneau cover thing definitely works. When I didn't have one, gas mileage was lower. But the only reason I got it was to hide that gun I got from "Jackal"[:)]. Works out nicely.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 7:10:44 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SWIRE: On pickup trucks I have heard that driving with your tail gate down will improve gas milage. Does anyone know if this is true? Personally I think it looks kind of stupid to drive with the tail gate down unless you have something too long for the truck bed. What about covers for a truck bed. The manufacturers make claims that it will improve gas milage but do they really?
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I picked up 15% by dropping the tailgate. As a side note, do not bother with "split fire" spark plugs, but do change your plugs, filters and clean your injectors/carb. Regular oil changes with proper weight oil will help as well. A better flow exhaust system will help too. Some of the aftermarket power chips can make a difference. And if you really want to get crazy, a cam. All kinds of things you can do, but is it worth the gains?
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 7:23:16 AM EDT
I run my pickup's tires approximately 10 pounds over the manufacturer's recommended unloaded pressure, and have seen no abnormal tire wear. It definitely rolls better – put the transmission in neutral and it cruises for a lot further on a flat road, and it handles better, too. Unfortunately, it also takes the bumps much harder! IMO, unless you're driving a sports car, the manufacturer's recommended tire pressures are based on what gives the best ride comfort while still maintaining adequate handling. While the average soccer mom might complain about a rougher ride if the pressure is increased, it *will* improve fuel economy somewhat.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 7:23:50 AM EDT
They say that cars use the most gas when starting and accelerating. Start your car and accelerate like the Flintstones do- with your feet..[:D]....
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 7:24:42 AM EDT
Install a "No Fat Chicks" decal. [img]http://www.explodingvan.com/krisby/no_fatties.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 7:52:20 AM EDT
Keep your intake/carb clean, change your air filter every 10k, oil every 3500, and replace the oxygen sensor every 30k, use your cruise control, don't run the air, don't drive, walk and inflate your tires to recomended pressure (no more no less.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 8:21:55 AM EDT
From a Ford web site. Bursting Their Bubble According to design experts, the truck tailgate is designed to create a cushion of air in the bed that aerodynamic engineers called a "seperated bubble" (the real nerdy ones refer to it as "Locked Vortex Flow.") Jargon aside, this invisible bubble of air actually helps deflect the faster moving wind coming over the cab so it passes over the truck's raised tailgate, keeping drag behind the truck minimized. "Putting the tailgate in the down position tends to increase turbulence and drag of the open box," explained Jack Williams, of Ford Aero Systems Engineering. "We've seen drag increase as much as .5 to 1 percent. Flow-through, web-like fabric replacement tailgates tend to increase drag even more; we've seen increases as much as 4 to 5 percent." In a nutshell, all of that extra drag translates into worse fuel economy for the vehicle. Dr. Edward Fitzgerald, an aerodynamics expert and a jet engine designer with Boeing, added that the effect is actually magnified with speed increases, so that 1 percent increase in drag with the tailgate down as city speeds has much more adverse effects on fuel economy at 70-75 mph on the open road.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 8:25:22 AM EDT
According to many of those same experts, the best way to improve a pickup's fuel economy is to leave the tailgate up and cover the bed with a quality after market tonneau cover. "Tonneau covers on pickup boxes reduce aerodynamic drag" said Ford's Jack Williams. "we've seen reductions of about 8 to 10 percent on the F150, which means the average fuel economy improvements for the EPA city/highway cycle(test) is about 2 percent. "The average steady-state (cruise control) fuel economy improvement at highway speeds is close to 5 percent.." Adding a tonneau could mean an improvement in fuel mileage that is the equivalent of a free gallon of gas for every 20 gallons used.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 8:34:09 AM EDT
Here's my tips. I had a car that got between 55 and 72 MPG. All of the various things that affect gas mileage were more easily noticeable. My tips are: Properly inflate your tires. Check inside your driver's side door for the specs. You can actually go a lb or two heavier without problem. Use the proper fuel recommended by the vehicle's manufacturer. Going with a higher octane rating will only get you very small, if even noticeable, gains. Change your fluids at regularly specified intervals. However, most oils can be used longer. I recommend Amsoil as a full synthetic. Most people report going 2x-3x the recommended mileage before changing. Oil analysis that people have done on their own reflects that Amsoil is, well.. the shiznit. I will be switching to it in my new car after a good break in period. Don't drive excessively fast. For every 10mph above about 50mph, drag from wind DOUBLES. That means at 80mph, drag is exponentially higher than at 50mph, and you WILL burn more gas. The only things that offset this a little are the aerodynamic efficiency and mass (weight) of your vehicle.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 8:58:38 AM EDT
Sell your gass guzzler and get something with good milage. Some fo the new VW Turbo Diesels get 50MPG. That or just move to a state witth lower gas prices.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 9:00:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By innocent_bystander: From a Ford web site. Bursting Their Bubble According to design experts, the truck tailgate is designed to create a cushion of air in the bed that aerodynamic engineers called a "seperated bubble" (the real nerdy ones refer to it as "Locked Vortex Flow.") Jargon aside, this invisible bubble of air actually helps deflect the faster moving wind coming over the cab so it passes over the truck's raised tailgate, keeping drag behind the truck minimized. "Putting the tailgate in the down position tends to increase turbulence and drag of the open box," explained Jack Williams, of Ford Aero Systems Engineering. "We've seen drag increase as much as .5 to 1 percent. Flow-through, web-like fabric replacement tailgates tend to increase drag even more; we've seen increases as much as 4 to 5 percent." In a nutshell, all of that extra drag translates into worse fuel economy for the vehicle. Dr. Edward Fitzgerald, an aerodynamics expert and a jet engine designer with Boeing, added that the effect is actually magnified with speed increases, so that 1 percent increase in drag with the tailgate down as city speeds has much more adverse effects on fuel economy at 70-75 mph on the open road.
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I call BS
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 9:03:46 AM EDT
My tip for improved gas milage: Don't buy a Dodge!
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 9:50:02 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Boomholzer: My tip for improved gas milage: Don't buy a Dodge!
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Well as much as I hate to say it, I have driven all of the Big 3 and Chevrolet gets the best milege. I am talking half ton trucks here. Dodge was the second best and FORD comes in last. With that being said, I do believe FORD makes the TOUGHEST trucks, won't drive anything else, but it does get shitty gas milege. Buy a Yugo
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 10:09:58 AM EDT
What ever happened to those 100-MPG carburetors that people were talking about in the early 80's????? Urban Legend? --LS
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 10:11:58 AM EDT
Another way to say gasoline, is to start and stop slowly. When you accelerate, press on the accelerator as if you were stepping on an egg, and of course if you can see that you are coming to a red light take your foot off the gas and coast up to the stop light. And of course try to get into the highest gear whenever possible.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 10:12:59 AM EDT
Originally Posted By longshot_va: What ever happened to those 100-MPG carburetors that people were talking about in the early 80's????? Urban Legend? --LS
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The Conservation of Energy Laws or the First Law Thermodynamics happened to it.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 10:26:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By AR15fan: Sell your gass guzzler and get something with good milage. Some fo the new VW Turbo Diesels get 50MPG. That or just move to a state witth lower gas prices.
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Yes, this is so true. 48 MPG @ 75MPH with AC on. The other tricks are sticking to stock tire widths, running higher tire pressures IAW the tire's instructions, not the car's. Ride will suffer but the effects are twofold. First rolling resistance is reduced but also a slight overdrive is effected. You will see little in observed mileage from the latter due to odometer obscuring but you will still save in real terms. Getting down to really tiny things, a good car was to remove bugs is worth a few tenths. Not measurable but every bit helps. Running the PROPER oil. Many people think the lighter oils do not lubricate as well but if you have oil pressure, you have ample lubrication. No oil pressure is a problem but new cars have tighter bearings and need less viscosity to achieve correct pressure. Proper grades of gasoline. If you car isn't pinging, you might be wasting money and octane. Again, RTFM. Putting 93 octane in a 1992 Chevy 350 V8 truck is probably a waste. Weight is only an issue on city driving unless you have so much junk in the trunk the car is riding bow high. Dragging the tail will definitely cut mileage. Plan well. Do not try to close a gap only to have to hit the brakes. You are paying double, once for the gas and second for brake pads. Drive at night. You need less AC. Jackrabbit starts can waste gas but accelerating too slowly also is wasteful. How? With modern cars, the fuel-air mix is tightly controlled, even during a 90% throttle acceleration. Accelerating slowly makes the engine run at lower manifold pressures and reduces the volumetric efficiency. This reduction in the actual compression pressure reduced engine efficiency and can hurt economy. Back in the carburator days, the opposit was true as these primitive mechanical proportioners ran rich at high throttle positions to protect the engine.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 10:34:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Aimless: I've never heard of people disabling power steering to increase their milege. I'm sure it would work, but do people really do that? I can't imagine bothering to do that unless it was some strange "I have to get across the desert on a gallon" scenario.
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I cut out the power steering in my rig, as I needed to get the best gas milage possible. I am driving an 87' Dodge Charger, and I was spending $70/week on gass because I drove so much. I definatly noticed a difference in power, and MPG when removing the PS. I also cut the A/C out of the car. That was also a big help. Another big jump in MPG and power. Losing all that paracitic drag on a car that only has 96HP was a big difference.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 10:35:55 AM EDT
I would suggest that you try to drive as smoothly as possible. Making erratic moves in both acceleration and steering cut down on MPG. As to the statement on running with the tailgate up, it works on my truck. I though BS too when I read that in the manual. I ran the truck down the highway with the tailgate up and made the same trip with it down. I got better milage with it up. Makes no sense to me what so ever. I have a club cab F150 with the short box.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 10:42:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/24/2003 10:43:59 AM EDT by sherm8404]
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 10:51:49 AM EDT
Siphon and creative math?
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:04:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/24/2003 11:04:35 AM EDT by Boomholzer]
from the link: Lowered Tailgate (Cd = 0.414) = 4.17% Decrease in drag
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:06:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Matthew_Q: Here's my tips. I had a car that got between 55 and 72 MPG.
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Really?? ANd what car was that?? SGtar15
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:10:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:13:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sherm8404:
Originally Posted By Boomholzer:
Originally Posted By innocent_bystander: From a Ford web site. Bursting Their Bubble According to design experts, the truck tailgate is designed to create a cushion of air in the bed that aerodynamic engineers called a "seperated bubble" (the real nerdy ones refer to it as "Locked Vortex Flow.") Jargon aside, this invisible bubble of air actually helps deflect the faster moving wind coming over the cab so it passes over the truck's raised tailgate, keeping drag behind the truck minimized. "Putting the tailgate in the down position tends to increase turbulence and drag of the open box," explained Jack Williams, of Ford Aero Systems Engineering. "We've seen drag increase as much as .5 to 1 percent. Flow-through, web-like fabric replacement tailgates tend to increase drag even more; we've seen increases as much as 4 to 5 percent." In a nutshell, all of that extra drag translates into worse fuel economy for the vehicle. Dr. Edward Fitzgerald, an aerodynamics expert and a jet engine designer with Boeing, added that the effect is actually magnified with speed increases, so that 1 percent increase in drag with the tailgate down as city speeds has much more adverse effects on fuel economy at 70-75 mph on the open road.
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I call BS
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You can't call BS on someone who's caing BS. I call BS on you calling BS. Innocent is correct. And here's the proof(sourced).....[url]http://mars.wnec.edu/~ehaffner/did.htm[/url] with pictures...... [url]http://mars.wnec.edu/~ehaffner/tg_down.jpg[/url] Leave your tailgate up, or get a Tonneau cover. Everything else results in increased drag.
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Cool, aerodynamics were never my specality. I stand corrected.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:27:08 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sgtar15:
Originally Posted By Matthew_Q: Here's my tips. I had a car that got between 55 and 72 MPG.
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Really?? ANd what car was that?? SGtar15
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A two-seater Diesel Yugo in tow. Or that one: [img]http://www.halesworth.ws/government/car.jpg[/img] 3cylinder, 800cc (that's .8liters) engine, 66mpg.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:32:02 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Keith_J: Jackrabbit starts can waste gas but accelerating too slowly also is wasteful. How? With modern cars, the fuel-air mix is tightly controlled, even during a 90% throttle acceleration. Accelerating slowly makes the engine run at lower manifold pressures and reduces the volumetric efficiency. This reduction in the actual compression pressure reduced engine efficiency and can hurt economy. Back in the carburator days, the opposit was true as these primitive mechanical proportioners ran rich at high throttle positions to protect the engine.
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Okay I stand corrected. I'm from the carburator days of yore. Back then, everything was mechanically controlled, I guess with the invention of the micro-processor somethings are now obsolete.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:35:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sgtar15:
Originally Posted By Matthew_Q: Here's my tips. I had a car that got between 55 and 72 MPG.
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Really?? ANd what car was that?? SGtar15
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Honda Insight. The most fuel efficient gasoline powered car in the US.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:38:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/24/2003 11:40:32 AM EDT by warlord]
Originally Posted By killingmachine123:
Originally Posted By Aimless: I've never heard of people disabling power steering to increase their milege. I'm sure it would work, but do people really do that? I can't imagine bothering to do that unless it was some strange "I have to get across the desert on a gallon" scenario.
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I cut out the power steering in my rig, as I needed to get the best gas milage possible. I am driving an 87' Dodge Charger, and I was spending $70/week on gass because I drove so much. I definatly noticed a difference in power, and MPG when removing the PS. I also cut the A/C out of the car. That was also a big help. Another big jump in MPG and power. Losing all that paracitic drag on a car that only has 96HP was a big difference.
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Man, I don't see how you folks can drive a vehicle that came with PS from the factory. The steering gear ratios in the manual steering is a lot highter than in its power steering counterpart. You folks must have arms of a gorilla. You guys are going to the extreme to save a few miles per gallon of gas. I guess if you were going straight a majority of time that would be okay.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:38:42 AM EDT
Hopefully not repeated, Jack you car up in the ass end. THat way you are always going downhill, thus saving gas. CH
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 11:52:08 AM EDT
Why waste your time and effort saving gas? If your car gets twentyfive miles per gallon and you drive 15,000 miles per year and save five miles per gallon and gasoline costs $1.65 per gallon you save $165.00 per year which works out to $3.17 per week. BFD. There is more than enough gas in the world for everyone to drive a nice car and a nice truck so just drive what you want to drive and drive safely.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 12:29:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By sherm8404:
Originally Posted By Boomholzer: from the link: Lowered Tailgate (Cd = 0.414) = 4.17% Decrease in drag
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Doh! Missed that one, but the mesh covers, caps and removing the tailgate completely add drag.
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I call BS on you calling BS to me calling BS!
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 12:34:51 PM EDT
Take the bus.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 12:43:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By sgtar15:
Originally Posted By Matthew_Q: Here's my tips. I had a car that got between 55 and 72 MPG.
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Really?? ANd what car was that?? SGtar15
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The Trabant- East Germany's favorite workers' car...... [img]http://jerg.ee.psu.edu/alumni/hagen/gifs/trabant.jpg[/img] [url=http://jerg.ee.psu.edu/alumni/hagen/Trabant/Tech-Specs/]Trabant P601S Technical Specifications[/url] Drivetrain: 4x2 Engine type: 0.6-liter 2-stroke 2-cylinder Compression ratio: 7.8:1 Transmission: 4-speed manual Horsepower: 26 @ 4,200 rpm Torque: 40.5 lbs.-ft. @ 3,000 rpm Front suspension: Single leaf spring Rear suspension: Independent trailing arms Steering: Rack-and-pinion Brakes: 4-wheel hydraulic drum Fuel tank capacity: 6.3 gallons Wheelbase: 79.5" Overall length: 138.2" Overhang (front/rear): 24.2"/36.2" Tread (front/rear): 47.5"/49.4" Overall width: 59.1" Overall height: 56.7" Ground clearance: 10.0" Cargo volume: 14.6 cu. ft. Seating capacity: 4 Fuel economy (city/highway): 37 mpg / 55 mpg Maximum speed: 77 mph (close enough....[:D])
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 12:50:17 PM EDT
It's all BS and you all suck! [:D]
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 1:33:08 PM EDT
When at the filling station, when the pump kicks off automatically, do not top off the gasoline. Also, before putting the nozzle back on the pump, shut off the pump switch with your hand, then squeeze the pump again to open it up. Lift up the hose as you squeeze the pump. This will let whatever gasoline is left in the hose drain into your car. Also, fill up in the early morning. Gasoline, like air will expand and contract with temperature. Since gas is sold by the gallon, it's better to buy cold gasoline than warm gasoline because you'll get more gas per gallon. -Nick Viejo.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 1:35:40 PM EDT
Reduce weight by ripping out the passenger and rear seats. Seriously, seats weigh alot and if you arent using them, they are useless. They make some of those fancy synthetic fuel additives. Keving67
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 2:06:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/24/2003 2:10:06 PM EDT by DefMan]
[img]http://www.geocities.com/licomputerman/Truck_L_Side.JPG[/img] I expect 15 on this one but get around 13 on normal driving.
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