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Posted: 6/20/2003 3:52:44 PM EDT
i have some great looking tri-tips on the menu tonight. any ideas how to prepair them? sugestions for what to go with it? Ben, The Emu
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 3:55:06 PM EDT
Would like to help, what are tri-tips ?
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 3:59:08 PM EDT
BBQ it with indirect heat. NoKarma
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 4:01:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NoKarma: BBQ it with indirect heat. NoKarma
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any seasoning? sides?
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 4:33:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By The_Emu:
Originally Posted By NoKarma: BBQ it with indirect heat. NoKarma
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any seasoning? sides?
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Try cooking this way: Smear the steak with olive oil, then use a rub of chili powder,garlic powder and course black pepper. Cover said steak in onions, mushrooms, garlic and sweet bell peppers[:P] Damn it! Now you made me hungry [:D]
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 5:06:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CAPITALIST:
Originally Posted By The_Emu:
Originally Posted By NoKarma: BBQ it with indirect heat. NoKarma
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any seasoning? sides?
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Try cooking this way: Smear the steak with olive oil, then use a rub of chili powder,garlic powder and course black pepper. Cover said steak in onions, mushrooms, garlic and sweet bell peppers[:P] Damn it! Now you made me hungry [:D]
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Sounds kinda spicy. does it mellow out or is it hot? Ben, The Emu
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 5:12:14 PM EDT
I tend to marinate mine over night in teriyaki. You can treat it like a roast. I like mashed potatoes and fresh corn. NoKarma
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:05:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By The_Emu:
Originally Posted By CAPITALIST:
Originally Posted By The_Emu:
Originally Posted By NoKarma: BBQ it with indirect heat. NoKarma
View Quote
any seasoning? sides?
View Quote
Try cooking this way: Smear the steak with olive oil, then use a rub of chili powder,garlic powder and course black pepper. Cover said steak in onions, mushrooms, garlic and sweet bell peppers[:P] Damn it! Now you made me hungry [:D]
View Quote
Sounds kinda spicy. does it mellow out or is it hot? Ben, The Emu
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It's not really that hot. It's got a nice taste to it. I'm not really into Hot foods. try it, you'll like it[;)]
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:14:03 PM EDT
Marinate it over night in your favorite dry rub or wet marinate sauce. The next day cover it in foil and cook it at about 250 degrees for 3-4 hours. Take it out and sear it on the grill. It will be tender and flavorful. My favorite way to have Tri-Tip. Cut it up and make chilli out of it.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:25:38 PM EDT
Another way is simply marinate it in Soy Sauce only about a half hour before you're going to grill it (otherwise it gets too salty). A lil pepper and garlic powder of course. Don't cook it any longer than medium rare or it gets tuff. Then be sure to diagonal slice it relative to the grain....THIN slices. MMMMMM I taste it already! --RR
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:28:33 PM EDT
Cut it up and make chili? You been in Washington too long. Let it come to room temperature. Dry rub with 50% paprika, 25% black pepper, 25% garlic salt about 15 minutes before starting. Kettle type barbecue with coal around the outside for indirect heat, or gas grill as indirct as possible, moderate heat. Cook fat side up for about 30 minutes, turn over for 10-15 minutes. Let it sit for 10 minutes and slice thin. They take slow cooking because you want to let the inside get warm and finish cooking while sitting without overcooking the outside. Fat up self marinates. Serve with pinquito or red beans, maybe whole pintos, fresh sweet corn (white if you can get it) and real sourdough bread This is a cut that doesn't need too much to make it right. The flavor and texture don't need enhancing or tenderizing if done right. The idea is to get a crust on the outside trapping the juices in and when you slice thin you don't overpower anything with the paprika, pepper and salt.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:32:00 PM EDT
The cut is also known sometimes as the Bottom Sirloin, you don't find it too much outside California at a regular market or butcher shop unless prepackaged. Not impossible, but not usually found. I got friend in OK that want me to fed-ex some cuz they loved it and can't find them.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:36:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 7:02:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/20/2003 7:06:49 PM EDT by limaxray]
[url=http://www.orbeef.org/tritip-brochure.htm]discover beef tri-tip[/url]
Discover the Great Taste of Beef Tri-Tip This flavorful beef cut has been one of the beef industry's best kept secrets. Tri-tip was seldom marketed when carcass beef or beef quarters were delivered to retail markets because there are only two tri-tips per carcass. This meant that there was not enough for a case display. Consequently, the butcher would grind or cube it. Today, most stores receive boneless boxed beef. If you don't see tri-tip in the meat case, ASK FOR IT. It may be temporarily out of stock. Tri-tip roasts can be ordered separately if your butcher knows there is a demand. A beef tri-tip roast is a boneless cut of meat from the bottom sirloin. It also is called "triangular" roast because of its shape. Tri-tip roasts will vary from 1 1/2 to 2 pounds and are about two inches thick. If a roast is cooked to rare in the center, the thinner outside edges are medium to well, offering perfectly cooked beef for every taste. The tri-tip can be cooked whole or cut into one-inch thick steaks or strips. When the meat is cut into one-eighth inch strips, it can be used for stir-fry recipes and fajitas. If it is cut into one-fourth inch thick strips, weave the meat onto skewers and quickly broil or grill. The beef tri-tip roast may be marinated if you wish. Marinating adds flavor but is not necessary to tenderize the cut. Looking for ways to reduce calories and fat? Tri-tip is the answer. A 3-ounce cooked portion of tri-tip is just 177 calories. Roast it. Grill it. Broil it. You can't go wrong with this cut! Where has tri-tip been hiding all these years? What a discovery! Cooking Tips Beef Tri-Tip Roasts: Broil - 4 to 5 inches from the heat source, 25-30 minutes* Roast - 425º for 30-35 minutes* Grill - 30-35 minutes over medium coals* *Meat temperature will be 135º for medium rare and 150º for medium. Tent roast with aluminum foil for 10 minutes before carving. During the standing time the temperature will rise 5-10º. Carve tri-tip across the grain into thin slices. Beef Tri-Tip Steaks, cut 1 inch thick: Panbroil over medium heat for a total of 8 minutes, turning once. Beef Tri-Tip Stir-Fry Strips, cut 1/8 inch thick: Stir-fry strips 1 to 1 1/4 minutes. Beef Tri-Tip Strips, cut 1/4 inch thick and woven on skewers: Broil about 3 inches from heat source or grill over medium coals for 2 to 3 minutes. In a Hurry? Discover how fast and flavorful a tri-tip can be with any of these quick ideas. Use any prepared Italian salad dressing for a zesty marinade. Thinly sliced left-overs make a great tasting French Dip. Make your mealtime a fiesta by rubbing packaged taco seasoning on the meat surface before cooking. Combine 1 cup prepared salsa, 1/4 cup chopped cilantro and 2 tablespoons oil for a Mexican marinade. Still searching for the easiest recipe? Just sprinkle the tri-tip with salt and pepper or seasoning salt. This cut is so flavorful it doesn't need anything else.
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Edited to add: Tri-tip holds a special place in the heart of missileers. Vandenberg AFB is on the coast of CA, just outside of Santa Maria, where Tri-tip BBQ originated. Since Vandenberg is the home of Undergraduate Missile Training, every missileer in the USAF over the past 40 years has had at least one taste of tri-tip while going through the four-month school.
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