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Posted: 6/10/2003 7:57:57 AM EDT
So I have the dish up & been recieving signal for a few months. Started getting bad reception. I have adjusted the dish some & I think I have decent signal on transponder 4. Not so good on some others. How many transponders do I need to have good service? Which ones should I shoot for? Thanks.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 8:25:16 AM EDT
Not sure on DirectTV. Give your service people a call. On DishNetwork, only one satellite and one transponder are locked in at a time. Two satellites and several transponders are available, but only one is used. I just had the repairman out to my house on Sunday. I kept losing the signal ("acquiring satellite signal") on certain channels. Some channels worked fine, others not at all. He had to replace the switch, the connectors and the cable. Everything is working fine now. Hopefully it stays that way. Good luck with your problem.[:)]
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 8:34:55 AM EDT
EP if you start recieving just one sat, check the power plug before calling anyone for service. Your primary reciever, if you have more than one, powers the switches. The recievers will work fine but only on one sat even with power plug pulled. Twice now I had to have a service tech come out only to have him push the plug in tight. Finally made him replace the cord and have had no problems since.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 8:37:33 AM EDT
All the problems that I have had have been as a result of problems with the connectors on the coax cable. If I cut about a foot off and put on a new connector the problem disappears. Dennis Jenkins
Originally Posted By Gun-fan: So I have the dish up & been recieving signal for a few months. Started getting bad reception. I have adjusted the dish some & I think I have decent signal on transponder 4. Not so good on some others. How many transponders do I need to have good service? Which ones should I shoot for? Thanks.
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Link Posted: 6/10/2003 9:48:16 AM EDT
I used to have these problems intermittently with my DirecTV - especially in winter and when there was bad cloud cover. I switched to Dishnetwork and have NEVER had a signal problem again. Better reception, too. Plus I got a PVR (digital recorder) integrated into the receiver that can record up to 35 hours of programming in perfect digital quality - and no extra monthly charge like TIVO charges. SWITCH to Dish!
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 10:06:06 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 1:00:56 PM EDT
I agree with the post regarding connectors. The 2GHZ signal coming from the dish needs a good path all the way to your receiver. Water getting in the coax, loose or coroded F connectors, cheap diplexers (splitters) can all cause problems. Finally traced a problem one day down to a bad coaxial surge suppressor on the power strip. Try hooking a length of new RG6 coax with good connectors up to the dish and staight into a receiver. If it looks good, there's something bad in the regular path between your dish and receiver. Good luck! Ed
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 2:54:22 PM EDT
I had a similar problem with my direct TV reception. The problem got progressively worse. My problem ended up being a bad LNB (the part that the dish reflects into). It cost me about $25 to fix it. I bought the part at Circuit City. Reception has been perfect ever since.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 3:06:30 PM EDT
Check your splitter box. Where the cable comes from the dish, chances are it goes into a splitter box, which distributes the signal to however many TV's you have. I would definately check all connections before you spend mucho dinero on a service guy.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 6:14:35 PM EDT
In the STUPID THINGS TO OVERLOOK department, make sure that the "line of sight" to the satellite isn't starting to get blocked by tree leaves. This time of year, trees grow rapidly and leaf out. You don't notice any reception problems until it reaches the "cliff" that [b]Paul[/b] mentioned. After that, the reception tends to come and go, as the leaves sway in the wind. Eventually, the leaves block enough of the signal to prevent reception all the time.
Link Posted: 6/11/2003 3:43:25 AM EDT
check all your connectors and make sure they are all in good shape, (not rusted out or broken) make sure nothing is hanging in front of the reflector, tree branches, etc and also make sure your mast is secure and the dish is bolted tightly 75% of the signal problems I have to deal with are from a crooked or loose mast (original install) or the dish not being tightened enough and the wind had turned it over time. Usually the stuff like lnbs and recievers are pretty bulletproof, although they do go out from time to time. My guess would be lose mast/dish, that just needs to be resecured and realigned.
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