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Posted: 6/4/2003 8:28:26 PM EDT
Can I drink milk from a goat with udder problems? I've got a nanny goat.. about 3 years old.. has had 3 litters... My significant other wants to milk her as I am ready to wean off her kids. My problem is, she has mastitis. sp? In other words big bag.. hangs down. Lots of milk, but hardening going on in her udder.. Is this an infection? will this affect the quality of milk for human consumption? Or would it be a better idea to nix this idea.. I was really looking forward to enjoying fresh goat milk every day and maybe making some Goat cheese [:)] Thank you Realist out
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 8:33:53 PM EDT
Sure, go ahead. Just remember to have your S.O. take before and after pics. cynic
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 8:47:27 PM EDT
S.O. ?? I was asking a serios question cynic..
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 11:41:06 PM EDT
BTT (Cuz I promised him someone would be along shortly with a worthwhile answer.) cynic
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:15:18 AM EDT
I wouldn't. Buy fresh goats milk at the store or find another goat.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:26:30 AM EDT
The goat's problem is that it is not being milked. If a goat or cow is not milked, their udders will harden prior to them drying up. Milk your goat twice a day for a week and it's udder should soften again. The milk should be good to drink. If you want, the old ranch test will tell you if it's good, give some of the milk to a cat, if it drinks it, your good to go. In order to keep the milk from being contaminated use a iodine wash on the udders prior to milking, about 1 part iodine to 4 parts water is good.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 4:54:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Gunslinger808: The goat's problem is that it is not being milked. If a goat or cow is not milked, their udders will harden prior to them drying up. Milk your goat twice a day for a week and it's udder should soften again. The milk should be good to drink. If you want, the old ranch test will tell you if it's good, give some of the milk to a cat, if it drinks it, your good to go. In order to keep the milk from being contaminated use a iodine wash on the udders prior to milking, about 1 part iodine to 4 parts water is good.
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Thanks Gunslinger.. the iodine is a good idea.. she is still being nursed by her kids. after searching a few sites through google, I am now worried about a several diseases that can pass through their milk. I wonder if there is a Lab available that will test her milk?
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 5:05:19 AM EDT
Sounds like a problem with the [red]"significant udder."[/red]
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 5:16:14 AM EDT
I am udderly repusled....sorry...had to milk this thread for all it was worth...
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 5:18:16 AM EDT
Will you be drinking it directly from the udder?
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 6:14:56 AM EDT
I don't know. It would depend what "udder" medical or family problems it is having.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 6:20:33 AM EDT
You should be able to contact a county extension agent, 4-H or even some community colleges that may have pre-veterinarian programs. They should be able to check the milk for certain bacteria and/or parasites. I would have the kids checked out as well. Also, make sure that the kids are actually getting milk from the udders. Failing any scientific testing, the cat test is probably within 95% reliability. Good luck. Let us know.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 6:36:05 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 6:38:31 AM EDT
Yes, but make sure you don't use any teeth.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 7:05:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/5/2003 7:31:54 AM EDT by thedave1164]
I saw this same post on another site....... Hello fellow FS member [:D]
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 7:59:12 AM EDT
lol.. we have some udder comedians here. Thanks, I'll check through my local health dept. or maybe SPCA for labs for testing. I thought I'd just inject her with penicillin for 4 days to see if it clears up, but I really won't know what else she may be harboring. The cat thing seems wierdto me,I would think that the cat will drink almost anything if it's Hungary enough. unless soured.. The Dave, back at you [:)] realist/wolfowner
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 8:20:55 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 5:25:02 PM EDT
LOL.. well, I'll be damned.. Ed Sr., is alive.. Don't you ever answer your emails? The rabbit wasn't diseased.. it just had the squirts ! [:)] I thought about giving it to Marie, but she is lactose intolerant along with the never ending list [rolleyes] Boiling milk? Hell no.. I don't want to ruin that sweet taste you get with goats milk.. Besides, and it's supposed to be naturally homogenized. I have chosen not to drink this nanny's milk and am buying into a new whole breed of goats.. The African Boer.. I have bought the Male allready.. weighing in at a mear 220 pounds !! The Wolf
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 7:29:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/5/2003 7:33:13 PM EDT by TWHaz]
UDDER-LY NOT[ROFL2] I mean it.[LOLabove]
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 8:39:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By realist: ... Boiling milk? Hell no.. I don't want to ruin that sweet taste you get with goats milk.. Besides, and it's supposed to be naturally homogenized. ... The Wolf
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You mean pasteurized? Now that would be quite the goat! [:)]
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 4:04:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Spudgunner: You mean pasteurized? Now that would be quite the goat! [:)]
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Nope.. Goat’s milk is naturally homogenized. This makes it a safer type of milk to drink. The reason? When cow’s milk is mechanically homogenized, the fat globules are forcibly broken up, allowing an enzyme associated with milk fat to break free and penetrate your intestinal walls. Once that happens, it’s in bloodstream, where it can scar the heart and arteries, stimulating the release of cholesterol into the blood in an attempt to lay a protective fatty shield down. Next stop, arteriosclerosis. Goat milk is the most consumed milk in the whole world.
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 4:19:35 AM EDT
Winn Dixie or Harris Teeter. I really can't tell one from the 'udder'.
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 9:57:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By realist: Nope.. Goat’s milk is naturally homogenized. This makes it a safer type of milk to drink. The reason? When cow’s milk is mechanically homogenized, the fat globules are forcibly broken up, allowing an enzyme associated with milk fat to break free and penetrate your intestinal walls. Once that happens, it’s in bloodstream, where it can scar the heart and arteries, stimulating the release of cholesterol into the blood in an attempt to lay a protective fatty shield down. Next stop, arteriosclerosis. Goat milk is the most consumed milk in the whole world.
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Cool. I was unaware of that. I can't believe the amount of interesting info to be found on ARFCOM. Kevin
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 1:04:56 PM EDT
CAN you drink it? I don't know, I'm still trying to figure out why anyone would WANT to! MournSword
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