Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 6/3/2003 9:56:32 AM EDT
A few days ago we had to accompany a family friend to the Vet (she asked us to come, cause she needed a shoulder to cry on). Major was still in his prime: a big, thick-necked German bred 170 pound Rottweiler. They had to put him to sleep cause he had such bad nerve damage in his front legs that he couldn't get up on his own, and his feet were curling over. Sad stuff, having to get rid of a pet- which is more like a friend. It wasn't even my dog and i cried like a baby [>(] Have any of you had to go through this?
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:03:49 AM EDT
I have more times than I care to think about. It sucks.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:04:32 AM EDT
I had a dog die on me out of no where. It was a bum deal, but what are you going to do. Sorry to hear about your frieds dog though.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:08:19 AM EDT
I did .Jan. 31, 2003- my partner and co-driver for almost 14 years, I'm still lost and heartbroken.[V]
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:09:06 AM EDT
My quail hunting buddy had to have our old pointer put down. She had hip displacia and was 15+ years old. It was about a year ago, but he told me recently, "As the Vet's assistant led her out of the room, she turned her head and looked at me one last time. I can't get that final look out of my mind."
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:19:11 AM EDT
Dogs don't last long; I've been through several. Some were a real loss; some were just dogs.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:20:38 AM EDT
I cried every time.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:27:22 AM EDT
It is horrible, It is so hard to do. Im sorry for your loss. [:(]
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:35:36 AM EDT
I have had to put 3 to sleep just within the last year. Another one also died. I get misty eyed just reading these type threads.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:35:39 AM EDT
Somebody posted this here once and I think it can stand another read--------A man and his dog were walking along a serene road, enjoying the scenic beauty, when it suddenly occurred to the man that he was not alive. Suddenly, he remembered dying, and that his dog had been dead for several years. He wondered where he was and where the road was leading them. After a while, the two of them, the man and his dog, came to a high, white stone wall along one side of the road. It looked like fine marble. At the top of a long hill, the wall was broken by a tall arch that shimmered in the sunlight. When he was standing before it, the man saw a magnificent gate in the arch that glistened like mother of pearl, and the street that led to the gate looked like pure gold. He and his dog walked toward the gate, and as he got closer, he saw a man at a desk behind the gate. When he was close enough, he called out, "Excuse me, can you tell me where we are?" "This is heaven," the man answered. "Wow! Would you happen to have some water?" the man asked. "Of course, sir. Come right in, and I'll have a pitcher of water brought right up." He then gestured, and the gate began to open. He approached the man at the desk and asked, "Can my friend there come in, too?" "I'm sorry, sir, but animals are not allowed here." The man hesitated for only a moment and then turned and walked back through the gate and continued down the road. After another long walk, and at the top of another long hill, he came to a dirt road which led through a weathered farm gate that was standing open. As he approached the gate, he saw a man inside, leaning against a tree and reading a book. "Excuse me!" he called to the reader. "Do you have any water?" "Yeah, sure, there's a pump over there." The man pointed to a well shaded by a large tree. "Come on in." "How about my friend here?" the traveler gestured to his dog. "Sure, There should be a bowl by the pump." The man and his dog went through the gate, and sure enough, there was an old fashioned hand pump with a bowl beside it. The traveler filled the bowl and even before he quenched his own thirst, he set the bowl down for his dog. He then took a long drink himself. They then walked back toward the man who was standing by the tree waiting for them. "What do you call this place?" the traveler asked. "This is heaven," was the answer. "Well, that's confusing," the traveler said. "The man down the road said that place was heaven, too." "Oh, you mean the place with the gold streets and pearly gates? Nope. That's hell." The man responded, "Well, doesn't it make you mad for them to use your name like that?" "No. I can see how you might think so, but we're just happy that they screen out the folks who'd leave their best friends behind."
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:44:22 AM EDT
It cost more, but its only money and I have through this too many times to care how much it cost. Call the vet and ask them to come to the house to put the dog down. If your vet will not, then find one that will. Make sure the dogs get a sedative before the shot of SP that will put them to sleep. Sometime the SP can cause alot of pain when it hits the brain. Its over very fast, but a hard thing to watch. I rent a baby back hoe $100.00 dropped right to the door. The grave digging goes real fast and it shouldnt tear up the yard. Both me and the wife feel better knowing the final resting place. PS if you end up selling or renting out the house dont tell the new people
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 10:44:36 AM EDT
Thanks, Cyanide, that was a good read. I've had to go through putting my animals to sleep too many times. My mother used to tell us that they would be waiting for us just over the rainbow bridge, with all of the other lost pets. There, they can play with each other and run and swim and be happy until we finally cross the rainbow bridge on our way to heaven. That way, neither our friends, nor us, will have to go to heaven without the other. I've got lots of friends waiting just over the rainbow bridge. Hope they're having a ball. Sorry for your loss, Buffalo-Soldier.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 12:12:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By buffalo-soldier: A few days ago we had to accompany a family friend to the Vet (she asked us to come, cause she needed a shoulder to cry on). Major was still in his prime: a big, thick-necked German bred 170 pound Rottweiler. They had to put him to sleep cause he had such bad nerve damage in his front legs that he couldn't get up on his own, and his feet were curling over. Sad stuff, having to get rid of a pet- which is more like a friend. It wasn't even my dog and i cried like a baby [>(] Have any of you had to go through this?
View Quote
It's a bad deal even when it's the best thing to do. Sympathies to you and your friend.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 12:39:19 PM EDT
u-baddog got it right. Pay a vet to come to the house. I've done it both ways and it's much nicer for the dog to go to sleep for the last time in his own bed. I hope someone will do the same for me some day.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 12:59:04 PM EDT
Thanks for the idea of the vet coming to the house. We'll soon have a large piece of property where many old pets were buried in our family and it seems like a good idea to continue the custom.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 1:33:05 PM EDT
Been there three times already. First one, I was too young to be there at the end. Second one was when I was 13. I held her in my arms as they gave her the shot. Last one died about 7 years ago. Cancer. Just seemed a little sluggish and thought it was early displaysia (he was only 9). Imagery turned up tumors all through his liver and lungs and working into the spine. Only 5 days later, he was gone. I was looking in his eyes when he went. Getting choked up typing this. Took me 4 years to think about another one. I have two more, now, and can't help but think about when the day comes for them. Enjoy every day with 'em. They go too fast.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 1:54:35 PM EDT
I lost a pet recently. It has been a whole helluva lot harder on me than breaking up with my psycho girlfriend.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 2:10:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By u-baddog: It cost more, but its only money and I have through this too many times to care how much it cost. Call the vet and ask them to come to the house to put the dog down. If your vet will not, then find one that will. Make sure the dogs get a sedative before the shot of SP that will put them to sleep. Sometime the SP can cause alot of pain when it hits the brain. Its over very fast, but a hard thing to watch. I rent a baby back hoe $100.00 dropped right to the door. The grave digging goes real fast and it shouldnt tear up the yard. Both me and the wife feel better knowing the final resting place. PS if you end up selling or renting out the house dont tell the new people
View Quote
[b]You're a good man u-baddog, I'd be proud to meet you and call you friend some day[/b]
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 2:35:43 PM EDT
jrzy Thanks... My sig pic is the last of a wonderful family of rotties. I raised her mother and father they both were great parents and good dogs. She died shortly after the pic was taken. Damn fine dogs. I only kept her because she was the runt of a litter and somehow retarded. She was real slow to learn anything and was afraid of everything as a new born puppy so I couldnt really place her with a good home knowing that (most bites happen when a dog is afraid). I kept her with the idea of placing her after she grew up alittle. At about 18 month old she came in to her own. It was like a light bulb went of in her head. She started acting almost normal and she learned her commands but she never was normal. she had deep seated fears that we couldnt ever help her with. I am glad we kept her. she died of bone cancer about 2 years ago. She was only 9 [:(]
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 3:43:21 PM EDT
i have gone to the homes of several people to put their animals to sleep - it is the hardest thing i have to do as a vet, but i also feel that it is a blessing that i can end an animal's suffering due to illness or help one pass when "it's time"... always ask your vet to give your pet a sedative before they are euthanized...makes it alot easier... i usually keep my cool when i am with the family members and try not to cry - but when i leave the room - i need a while to get myself together...some affect me for a long time -
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 3:56:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/3/2003 3:57:37 PM EDT by die-tryin]
[img]http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid24/p08cff4ebf36cc820ed5355e4b37fff18/fd910694.jpg[/img] yipper er..had to take the one way trip with our dog "pepsi" ..worst thing i ever had to do..havent been able to replace him..goin on 2years now..to help in the healing process. my wife volunteers at Humane SOciety..give sumthin back to the animals..
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 4:16:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/3/2003 4:19:18 PM EDT by BallisticTip]
I will be going through this soon, got an old girl that is family, she is doing alright but is sick. Man I don't think I will be able to handle it. Hurts me to read this post. We all need to pull together when we loose a best friend.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 4:30:15 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 4:35:35 PM EDT
Six weeks ago put my old greyhound, a retired racer, down. Still sad when I think of her. Parrot did not speak for a week afterwards as he missed her too. Still calls out for her.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 4:41:35 PM EDT
alaman....that sux..and honestly that would freak me out bout the parrot..but i can relate..
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 4:43:13 PM EDT
Cyanide... That story was an episode from The Twilight Zone or some other similar show. I saw it. My current dog is in her prime at the age of three, and she's the most incredible companion any of us have ever had. She's so smart, trainable, lovable, gentle, dependable, protective, good looking, and funny that we didn't know a dog could be like that. It'll be a VERY dark, gloomy day when she reaches the end of her (hopefully very long and happy) lifeline. I don't know for sure if all humans have souls, but I KNOW that SOME dogs do. My Sarah definitely does. We got her under unusual circumstances. We'd gone up to Alabama to return my grandmother's body to her home (she'd spent the last two years with us, an Alzheimer's patient) and on the evening after her funeral, we met this wonderful young Australian Shepherd at my uncle's house. Not his dog, apparently she'd been abandoned. She made a huge impression on us immediately (she crawled into my lap and went to sleep!) and a day later, nobody had claimed her, so we took her home. Turns out she'd been abandoned presumably because her former owners knew she'd been exposed to Parvo. She got it, but she survived with no ill effects. I guess the former owners couldn't afford the vet's treatments and gave her a better chance by hoping her personality would win her a new family's love before she got sick. A good gamble, it turns out. And she is worth every penny the vet got, and then some. We think that maybe Grandma sent us this wonderful dog as thanks for our service to her in her last years. It feels good to think so. Now I'm going to go play with my dog for a while. I feel the need to do so. CJ
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 5:08:45 PM EDT
If you are strong, or don't mind tearing a little, [b]The Power of a Dog[/b] [center] There is sorrow enough in the natural way From men and women to fill our day; But when we are certain of sorrow in store, Why do we always arrange for more? Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware Of giving your hearts to a dog to tear. Buy a pup and your money will buy Love unflinching that cannot lie - Perfect passion and worship fed By a kick in the ribs or a pat on the head. Nevertheless it is hardly fair To risk you heart for a dog to tear. When the fourteen years that nature permits, Are closing in asthma, or tumor, or fits, And the Vet's unspoken prescription runs to lethal chambers or loaded guns, Then you will find - it's your own affair But - you've given your heart to a dog to tear. We've sorrow enough in the natural way When it comes to burying Christian clay. Our loves are not given, but only lent At compound interest of cent per cent, For when debts are payable, right or wrong, A short time loan is as bad as a long - So why in Heaven (before we are there) Should we give our hearts to a dog to tear? When the body that lived at your single will, When the whimper of welcome is stilled (HOW STILL!) When the spirit that answered your every mood Is gone - wherever it goes - for good, You soon discover how much you care, And give your heart to a NEW dog to tear. [/center] RUDYARD KIPLING
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 5:22:46 PM EDT
Hardest thing I ever did in my life was watching my pal of almost 15 years be put down. Our golden retriever buddy was just so old and sick he had to go. We knew it...but it hurt so badly. Miz LWilde couldn't be with him so I had the duty. I wasn't going to leave him alone with just the vet. I scratched his ears and talked to him as he left us. Crap...it still hurts. Now the four year old boy wants a pooch. Not sure if I could handle that again.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 5:25:09 PM EDT
Tough stuff. If you believe in a Divine Being, perhaps said Being made the lives of pets short to prepare us for losing our parents/spouses. I dunno. Maybe. Think I'll use the last light of the day to play some fetch with Abby...
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 5:31:08 PM EDT
It's amazing how close you can get to a good dog. I've had 4 or 5 and shed a tear whenever any one of them departed this life. It never got any easier.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 5:38:06 PM EDT
I'm getting all choked up reading this. Mom's dog is 12, and doesn't get around so good. His mother was 18 when she was put down. I have 3 boys; one's almost 2, 1 at 1 1/2 and 1 just turned 8 weeks. I don't even want to think about this...never easy. I'm going to turn this damn thing off and go play with them right now.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 5:55:38 PM EDT
lol..yes everyone go an play with their dogs..lol.and throw in a special treat for em tonite..your spouse will ask what got into you..tell em ya was reading AR15.com , that should get ya a weird look. lol
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 6:08:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/3/2003 6:15:44 PM EDT by propguy]
[img]http://photos.ar15.com/WS_Content/ImageGallery/IG_LoadImage.asp?iImageUnq=12996[/img] [:|]
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 6:41:16 PM EDT
I had to put my little buddy "Midnight" to sleep this past Feb. He was a 15lb Black cat with one ear. I adopted him from a org called AWARE 3 years ago. He was definatly the coolest cat there ever was. I think he had one too many hits off of the catnip bong. I would be playing on the computer with him cradled in my arm for hours on end and all he would do was pur! He would sleep curled up in the crook of my arm, and give me an earfull wondering where I had been when I got back from a multiday trip. Then there was the begging of the Chicken Tikka Masala every time I brought some home. I think he was raised by a pack of dogs because didnt act like a cat. He started sneezing blood one day and after many visits to the vets I found out that he had cancer in his nasal cavity. When it got to be too much my Mom and I went and had him put to sleep. I am so glad she was there with me! He went to sleep in my arms while I talked to him and rubbed his paws. Hardest thing I have ever done. I was blubbering like a 6ft 210 lb baby. On his grave marker I had written. Midnight Best Dog I ever Had RIP BUDDY!
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 7:12:47 PM EDT
One of my favorites: The one absolutely unselish friend that man can have in this selfish world, the one that never deserts him, the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous, is his dog. A man's dog stands by him in prosperity and poverty, in health and sickness. He will sleep on the cold ground, where the wintry winds blow and the snow drives fiercely, if only he may be near his master's side. He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer; he will lick the wounds and sores that come in encounter with the roughness of the world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master, as if he were a prince. When all other friends desert he remains. When the riches take wings and reputation falls to pieces, he is constant in his love as the sun in it's journey through the heavens. 'If fortune drives the master forth an outcast in the world, friendless and homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher privilege than that he accompany him, to guard against danger, to fight against his enemies, and when the last scene of all comes, and death takes the master in it's embrace, and his body is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all other friends pursue their way, there by the graveside will the noble dog be found, his head between his paws, his eyes sad, but open in alert watchfulness, faithful and true even in death.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 9:09:57 PM EDT
Wow, Threads like this totally bum me out. Just lost my parents dog Lucy. Thankfully she died at home and did not have to be humiliated in a vets sterile office, died in my moms arms as she petted her. We have always had dogs, and Lucy was the finest dog ever. What a beautiful gentle dog that always was a good girl, she was a Toy Havanese, part of the Bichon family. A peerless little pooch. Good-bye Lucy... maybe we can play chase the sock again one day... that would be really nice. Dram... :(
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 9:27:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/3/2003 9:30:28 PM EDT by Wolfpack]
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 9:35:02 PM EDT
damn, Sumo that was beautiful!!!! I've posted excerpts from that poem, but I've never read the whole thing!!!! I've had to put down a couple of pals. My childhood English Setter, a German Shepard, and my yellow Lab last year. Each time I stayed with then till the end, holding their paw, and stroking their head. They knew they were not alone... He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion. Anonymous
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 9:41:30 PM EDT
I've had 2 of em put down and like you all know it totally sucks...I have a Golden and a Beagle now and I love em both but my kids are the ones I really worry about. My 4yr old does everything with these dogs. Everywhere he goes in the house or the property the dog's are with him. Sometimes I look at them all together and think about the "putting them to sleep part" I would'nt know what to say...Damn
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 9:55:36 PM EDT
ouch bro...why didnt you tell me.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 12:59:17 PM EDT
My dog, hated the Vet's office, she would get nervous, and I could see she was distressed at the vets, when her time came, I called and no vet in my county would come out to do her the favor of a peacefull end, so, I had to take her for the final walk, it was hard, but as hard as it was for me, she deserved the best, it was a horrible thing to do, but I did it for her, she rated it.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 1:24:11 PM EDT
As awful as it is, my older dog hates the vet too. It kills me to think about it, but I think a .22 in the yard would be more merciful than scaring the shit out of him by taking him in there.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 1:45:10 PM EDT
My babe was always nervous at the vet's also, when the time came, I had the vet ready before we went in. We went for the last walk, the last slurping, and then went in and it was over before she had a chance to get nervous. but it [u]still[/u] hurts, these months later.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 1:52:47 PM EDT
I might get flamed big-time for this, but where I grew up, we took them out in the woods and gave them one to the head. We always used a round large enough (usually a .357 or a .44) to do the job and they always collapsed at the shot. I always felt my dogs were my responsiblity and I wanted to be the one who did it.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 2:01:08 PM EDT
unless it was rabid, i couldnt go it..
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 2:32:52 PM EDT
I've had to put my share of dogs down over the years and it kills me everytime. I also believe in the do-it-yourself approach, which is probably much harder for the owner but IMO easier on the dog as they don't have to go to the vet (my dogs always hated going to the vet). My last dog was a Great Dane named Brutus, a huge dog with a huge heart. He was my wife and kids personal bodyguard and my friend and hunting buddy. He develeoped a brain lesion and got bad seizures at around 7 years of age. After trying the things we could afford, I decided his time was up, he was having 6-12 bad seizures a day and afterward he would snap at us like he did not know us. So one early morning before the kids woke up, I took Brutus out to the desert and we watched the sunrise and gave him his favorite ball and when he had his attention on something else, I gave him a double-tap to the brain with a .45 acp. He dropped immediately and I buried him in the area where we did alot of rabbit hunting. Damn good dog. Wife and kids want another dog but for some reason I just not ready yet.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 2:51:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Hellraiser: I've had to put my share of dogs down over the years and it kills me everytime. I also believe in the do-it-yourself approach, which is probably much harder for the owner but IMO easier on the dog as they don't have to go to the vet (my dogs always hated going to the vet). My last dog was a Great Dane named Brutus, a huge dog with a huge heart. He was my wife and kids personal bodyguard and my friend and hunting buddy. He develeoped a brain lesion and got bad seizures at around 7 years of age. After trying the things we could afford, I decided his time was up, he was having 6-12 bad seizures a day and afterward he would snap at us like he did not know us. So one early morning before the kids woke up, I took Brutus out to the desert and we watched the sunrise and gave him his favorite ball and when he had his attention on something else, I gave him a double-tap to the brain with a .45 acp. He dropped immediately and I buried him in the area where we did alot of rabbit hunting. Damn good dog. Wife and kids want another dog but for some reason I just not ready yet.
View Quote
Get one HR, they are true buds, your old one would understand.
Top Top