Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 5/27/2003 7:30:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/27/2003 10:29:17 AM EDT by notso]
As of this thursday night, my life will never be the same. A speech, a short walk across stage, applause, a reception, and the end of what I have known as my life for 12 years. I am sitting hwere contemplatin the end of my years in school, and the beginning of college life. The fact that I made valedictorian makes it somewhat easier to swallow, but it is still the end of all that I have known as normal. At least I get to go out with a bang! Unlike mos people, I like giving speeches, as long as I can have fun with them. Graduation. Man... I never expected it to come so soon. But hey, at least the closin of this chapter in my life can open up a new one, COLLEGE!!!! And hopefully me getting an AR. Just thought Id write what has been running through my head for a couiple of weeks...
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 7:37:47 AM EDT
Congragulations. Now, what are you going to study in college? If you say history, or psychology, God help you. If you say engineering, be prepared to work in a cubicle for the rest of your life (unless you start your own firm or something). If you are pre-law, be prepared to be disillusioned and lose your scruples. If you are pre-med, be prepared to stay in school for another 10 years, and be in a mountain of debt. so, what's left? But don't let me discourage you. Heheh
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 7:39:22 AM EDT
Im going into Mechanical Eng. I like to build things, so I hope im not in a cubicle
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 7:48:27 AM EDT
Congratulations. I am a ME. Good choice, as MEs learn a little of all disciplines. I went on after that to get an MBA. Schooling never ends... it just takes breaks every now and again.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 7:51:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By notso: Im going into Mechanical Eng. I like to build things, so I hope im not in a cubicle
View Quote
And you think you won't be in a cubicle? Here's what you do. Go visit some engineering firms. Look around. See what the MAJORITY of people are doing. That is what you will be doing. You can have high aspirations and all that jazz, but at the end of the day you'll be sitting in a cubicle.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 8:04:34 AM EDT
I sit in a cubicle. [:(]
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 8:04:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By notso: Im going into Mechanical Eng. I like to build things, so I hope im not in a cubicle
View Quote
Being a mech eng doesn't make you a machinist, or a mechanic. Do what makes you happy, not the "standard course" that smart people are supposed to follow. No, I was not valedictorian, but I was one of the "smart" people. I was SUPPOSED to go to college, and I did. I hated it. I failed out after alot of partying. Joined the Navy, ran a reactor on a sub for 6 years. Finished my bachelors and masters. Here I am, cubeville.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 8:10:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By notso: Im going into Mechanical Eng. I like to build things, so I hope im not in a cubicle
View Quote
Where are you going to school? I've got an ME degree that I'm currently not using. If I had the choice again, I'd go to Purdue. I'm a huge open-wheel fan, and there are a boatload of Indycar teams in Indianapolis. I'd have loved to work for one of them while I was in school. Just make sure you concentrate on something you enjoy, and try to get published as much as possible. Future employers love that kinda stuff. You've chosen a tough field. MEs, right out of school, aren't making as much as they used to. Avoid the aircraft industry like the plague.If you're school's got a Formula SAE project, get on it right away. Practical experience is clutch, and it's a fun way to see all of the theory you're learn, actually put into use. Plus, it'll gain you some very valuable skill like welding, and CNC machining, etc. This all looks great on a resume, especially if you want to get involved with any of the automotive companies.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 8:31:56 AM EDT
I'm an ME....I work in a cubicle. Hell, I used to design those same components that make the cubicles I now sit in. I worked for an office furniture manufacturing facility. I did everything from programming and running the CNC machines to designing and installing entire office layouts. So now I sit surrounded by my creations, at a different company, designing food processing equipment for the dairy industry.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 8:36:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/27/2003 8:38:43 AM EDT by Cincinnatus]
Originally Posted By Stoney-Point: I'm an ME....I work in a cubicle. Hell, I used to design those same components that make the cubicles I now sit in.
View Quote
Are you sure you're not posting this...... [size=6][b][red]...from HELL![/size=6][/b][/red] [devil][devil][devil][devil][devil][devil][de­vil][devil]
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 8:44:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 8:56:16 AM EDT
Congratualtions! When I finished high school I also started a ME degree - and then I dropped out and joined the army. And look at me now! [:D]
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 9:06:33 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 9:09:08 AM EDT
Congratulations. In an effort to prepare you for whats ahead, I'd like to share this with you: Life starts getting faster the farther away you get from graduating high school. You'll blink twice and you'll be facing your 10 year reunion. Blink again, and your having your midlife crisis. The more days you have behind you, the faster they seem to go. What's my point? Enjoy every last minute you've got. Don't take any of them for granted. And that doesn't necessarily mean go busting your ass in school. If I hadn't dropped out of college, I wouldn't have met my wife and gone on to father my children. Life may throw you some curveballs, but take them in stride. They always seem earth-shattering when they happen, but they tend to work out. Congratulations, and I pray for only the best in your future. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 9:20:55 AM EDT
If I recall correctly, this summer should be the best you'll ever have. Enjoy.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 9:23:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By notso: Im going into Mechanical Eng. I like to build things, so I hope im not in a cubicle
View Quote
I started out in mechanical engineering. I'm a lawyer now. Watch your step.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 9:36:48 AM EDT
Screw the cubicle thing...go fly jets for a living!
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 9:39:49 AM EDT
Originally Posted By notso: The fact that I made validictorian makes it somewhat easier to swallow,
View Quote
Please tell me how you can be "validictorian" when you can't even SPELL it?? valedictorian
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 9:41:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/27/2003 9:43:14 AM EDT by clean_cut]
Do what you want to do. Don't study something because it will make a lot of money (supposedly). That said, ME ought to be a fine choice for you.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 10:30:31 AM EDT
Yeah, I know, my spelling stinks, but thats what they made spellcheck for right? [;)]
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 10:43:15 AM EDT
for the last 23 years i've been a design engineer...mechanical/aerospace tooling. i have never, not for even one day, worked in a "cubicle". my office is 24' x 36'. as a valedictorian (something i could never aspire to!!!), i would expect you will be one of the leaders in your college course work. don't sell yourself short! you need never spend time in a cubicle. congratulations and good luck!
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 10:53:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Cincinnatus: If I recall correctly, this summer should be the best you'll ever have. Enjoy.
View Quote
If I recall this man is correct. Congrats on the grad thing. I work for a large civil firm, the only people who are in cubes are EIT's, Cad, admin or field guys. Get your PE and act the part you would be in a office at my firm. Excuse me I have to close my door. Good luck................
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 10:54:30 AM EDT
I live in Cubeville. I'm an ME in the jet engine industry working as a stress analyst. Compressor hardware is my game. Cubeville ain't that bad, boss; I'm getting paid to post on AR15.com! [;)]
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 10:58:38 AM EDT
Originally Posted By u-baddog:
Originally Posted By Cincinnatus: If I recall correctly, this summer should be the best you'll ever have. Enjoy.
View Quote
If I recall this man is correct. Congrats on the grad thing. I work for a large civil firm, the only people who are in cubes are EIT's, Cad, admin or field guys. Get your PE and act the part you would be in a office at my firm. Excuse me I have to close my door. Good luck................
View Quote
While this may be true for most Civils and also for those MEs who work in building construction or HVAC, most ME positions place little importance on the PE cert. Due to the nature of your work, you guys (Civil) have more liability issues than we do (ME), generally speaking.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 11:15:34 AM EDT
I'm a ME, EIT with under a year before the PE. I have an office with a window. [%|] I'm a project manager for a paper mill.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 11:15:41 AM EDT
Congradulations!, As an ME you can work in any sort of environment you want. Remember that the degree is only an entry ticket into the big world of your chosen profession. Initially, you'll use precious little of the education you receive. As your career progresses, the basics you learn will become more and more important in helping your overall understanding of problem solutions. As an ME you can do anything from (eventually) oversee a factory manufacturing floor to design turbine's for the space shuttle (the next generation one that is). You can specialize in any area you really like. Pick a field that excites you and dive into it with all your heart.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 12:37:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By hsvhobbit: As an ME you can do anything from (eventually) oversee a factory manufacturing floor to design turbine's for the space shuttle (the next generation one that is).
View Quote
A turbine engine on a space vehicle? Jet turbines, gas turbines, turbo-props, turbo-shafts, etc. all use the earth's atmosphere as a source of oxygen for combustion. No flames intended but how would this work on a space vehicle?
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 1:21:05 PM EDT
Keep your options open. This is really why you go to college. Next, in order to keep your options open in college, keep your grades up (pretty easy to do). When you are ready to leave college, you'll be able to make a more knowledgeable decision about career options. And, if you still cannot make a knowledgeable decision about career options, flip a coin!
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 1:40:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By chuckhammer:
Originally Posted By u-baddog:
Originally Posted By Cincinnatus: If I recall correctly, this summer should be the best you'll ever have. Enjoy.
View Quote
If I recall this man is correct. Congrats on the grad thing. I work for a large civil firm, the only people who are in cubes are EIT's, Cad, admin or field guys. Get your PE and act the part you would be in a office at my firm. Excuse me I have to close my door. Good luck................
View Quote
While this may be true for most Civils and also for those MEs who work in building construction or HVAC, most ME positions place little importance on the PE cert. Due to the nature of your work, you guys (Civil) have more liability issues than we do (ME), generally speaking.
View Quote
I am sorry if I implied I was a PE. I am not, I wish ! I'm just lucky they needed someone of my background and skill set.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 2:37:30 PM EDT
Actually Chuckhammer I don't consider myself flamed at all. (smile) I didn't say turbine ENGINES as such, rather I said TURBINES. Specifically, the current Space Shuttle Main Engine (aka SSME) utilizes turboPUMPS, these are essentially turbine engines but with a twist, they burn LOX and Hydrogen to generate the power to pump either LOX or LH2 (liquid Hydrogen) to power the engine. Even more interesting is that each side (LOX side and H2 side) dump their exhaust into the combustion chamber and thus are DESIGNED to run slightly LOX rich or LOX deficient to enhance combustion. These are highly complex beasts capable of flowing in excess of 3/4 ton (1500 lbs) of LOX and LH2 per SECOND at several thousand PSI, quite impressive. While some may think that there's not much to doing such a feat, remember that you have one side of the turbopump running at several THOUSAND degrees F and the other side pumping liquid at MINUS several hundred degrees F, they really are state-of-the-art...it's reasonable to assume that the next generation will perform at even higher levels. I know, I know, more than you wanted to hear but I used to work the SSME program for over 10 years and I've gotta make SOME use of this trivia.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 4:38:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By hsvhobbit: Actually Chuckhammer I don't consider myself flamed at all. (smile) I didn't say turbine ENGINES as such, rather I said TURBINES. Specifically, the current Space Shuttle Main Engine (aka SSME) utilizes turboPUMPS, these are essentially turbine engines but with a twist, they burn LOX and Hydrogen to generate the power to pump either LOX or LH2 (liquid Hydrogen) to power the engine. Even more interesting is that each side (LOX side and H2 side) dump their exhaust into the combustion chamber and thus are DESIGNED to run slightly LOX rich or LOX deficient to enhance combustion. These are highly complex beasts capable of flowing in excess of 3/4 ton (1500 lbs) of LOX and LH2 per SECOND at several thousand PSI, quite impressive. While some may think that there's not much to doing such a feat, remember that you have one side of the turbopump running at several THOUSAND degrees F and the other side pumping liquid at MINUS several hundred degrees F, they really are state-of-the-art...it's reasonable to assume that the next generation will perform at even higher levels. I know, I know, more than you wanted to hear but I used to work the SSME program for over 10 years and I've gotta make SOME use of this trivia.
View Quote
Roger that. After posting, I figured you might be referring to turbopumps but I had always thought of them as being the fuel pumps for a liquid fuel rocket engine rather than actually being the source of propulsion. Your explanation of their operation has helped me to better understand the cycle. Interesting stuff. The temperature difference must play hell with the thermal expansion calculations on the turbopump housing and bearings. I'm guessing you guys used FEA heat transfer models to figure that out? I'm used to dealing with a jet engine compressor where you get maybe -80F on the fan inlet up to maybe 1200F on the HP compressor exit, going into the combustor. Who's the designer/manufacturer for those pumps?
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 5:02:37 PM EDT
Chuckhammer; The early designers were the guys at Rocketdyne/Rockwell, just a few years ago the turbopumps were redesigned and are now being built by P&W. They're heavier and a little less efficient but much more robust. You're correct about the turbopumps being analogous to the fuelpumps on a car but with the twist that they also provide a useful assist in the SSME burning efficiency. I'm sure that the guys doing the design used FEA to the max possible, (I worked a subsystem not directly related to the pumps), they also had to stretch the bounds of material properties. In alot of cases, data simply didn't exist for the effects of stuff like LH2 on turbine blades (embrittlement for example) and seals. Remember, the initial designs were started in the 70's and computers weren't all that advanced. There are some pretty cool designs out there for the next generation of engineers to work on. I still have trouble believing that the Aerojet external combustion chamber can even work. (picture a rocket engine nozzle doing it's burning on the OUTSIDE of the nozzle.) At any rate, 'Notso' has a delightful future ahead of him if he'll follow his heart and put his soul into his profession.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 5:07:48 PM EDT
I am graduating this year too. Well, if I can pull my act together. I have a D in math, and with the whole graduating a year early I have no wiggle room. Im no valedictorian, but I am 3.5+ GPA. I want to be an Army officer.
Link Posted: 5/27/2003 7:49:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By hsvhobbit: Chuckhammer; The early designers were the guys at Rocketdyne/Rockwell, just a few years ago the turbopumps were redesigned and are now being built by P&W. They're heavier and a little less efficient but much more robust. You're correct about the turbopumps being analogous to the fuelpumps on a car but with the twist that they also provide a useful assist in the SSME burning efficiency. I'm sure that the guys doing the design used FEA to the max possible, (I worked a subsystem not directly related to the pumps), they also had to stretch the bounds of material properties. In alot of cases, data simply didn't exist for the effects of stuff like LH2 on turbine blades (embrittlement for example) and seals. Remember, the initial designs were started in the 70's and computers weren't all that advanced. There are some pretty cool designs out there for the next generation of engineers to work on. I still have trouble believing that the Aerojet external combustion chamber can even work. (picture a rocket engine nozzle doing it's burning on the OUTSIDE of the nozzle.) At any rate, 'Notso' has a delightful future ahead of him if he'll follow his heart and put his soul into his profession.
View Quote
Thanks for the information. I always like to learn about new technology in power machinery. Good luck to all of you who are just beginning your lives as men. Be proud of what you do, both in your personal and your professional lives, and you'll always be happy.
Link Posted: 5/29/2003 9:06:47 PM EDT
Its over. Had a great time. Weve got a great superintendent at our school, so I got to use my Tippmann 98c as a prop for my speech. I blocked off the hopper and gassed up the gun, then at the end of my speech, fired it into the air a couple of times. No paint, just co2. It was acctually our super's idea. Guess he wanted to keep everyone awake. It worked! Everyone must have junped 6" in the air. pretty fun... Then off to have pizza and goof off. As I said great time. And I now have enough money to get my kit to build my first AR. Life is Good... Life is good...
Top Top