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Posted: 5/14/2003 5:09:20 AM EDT
This time the officer didn't go home... Your thoughts?
Officer guilty in death of shoplifting suspect 05/14/03 James F. McCarty Plain Dealer Reporter After five days of tense deliberations, a jury convicted Maple Heights police officer Jameel Talley of involuntary manslaughter yesterday in the death of a suspected shoplifter. The jury of eight women and four men rejected Talley's claims that the death of Guy Wills III last year was an accident. Talley, 35, faces mandatory prison time for the crime. Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge Timothy McGinty will sentence him June 23 to anywhere from three to 10 years. As a felon, Talley can never again work as a police officer. Three employees of the Randall Park Mall Dillard's store who saw the two men scuffle said the muscular Talley picked up Wills, 41, and threw him head-first to a concrete floor. Wills' skull was fractured in two places, his collarbone was broken, and his brain was fatally bruised. He died two days later. Talley, moonlighting as a security guard, said he slipped while trying to handcuff Wills, and they fell together to the floor. Wills was high on heroin and cocaine, and had stuffed a $159 leather coat under his windbreaker. Several jurors, reached at their homes, described the quest for a verdict as emotional and arduous. The jurors, who asked not to be identified, said they initially were divided between finding Talley guilty of murder and acquitting him. On Friday, the third day of deliberations, the panel's foreman, a bank employee from Beachwood, sent the judge a note: "If we believe we are a hung jury, what is the procedure?" He sent another note on Monday, saying, "We are at a stalemate." McGinty wrote back telling them to keep trying. In the end, one holdout, a middle-aged woman, argued for an acquittal, the jurors said. But shortly after 2:30 p.m. yesterday, she relented, agreeing to convict Talley of a less serious offense, involuntary manslaughter. Veteran judges and lawyers said the jury's lengthy deliberations, while long, were not unusual in a murder case. Wills' family, owners of the House of Wills funeral homes in Cleveland, had kept a quiet vigil at one end of a courthouse hallway while the jury was making its decision. At the other end, Talley and his supporters bided their time, occasionally holding hands in a prayer circle. When the verdict finally was announced, there were no outbursts, only silent tears. "This is a day we've all been looking forward to," said Tiffany Dennis, the victim's sister. "Talley is a killer. My brother didn't deserve to die." Talley's sister, Stephanie, wept and mouthed a silent "Bye" to her brother as sheriff's deputies led him from the courtroom to a holding cell. Defense lawyer Patrick D'Angelo praised the jury for its dedication and Talley for his resolve. He vowed to appeal the verdict. Wills' cousin, Brandon Abdul Baqi, praised the jury for performing a public service. He said this wasn't the first time Talley had seriously hurt someone. In September 1999, Talley led a police chase to stop a stolen car. He struck the suspect with his cruiser, breaking his leg. A police videotape also showed Talley dragging the suspect across the ground and kicking him. Three months later, Talley responded to a call of a shoplifter outside the Randall Park Mall by firing six shots into the suspect's car until it stopped. Talley claimed he had only shot twice, but his gun clip revealed the discrepancy.
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Link Posted: 5/14/2003 5:48:30 AM EDT
typical badass-with-a-badge. there's lots of 'em out there, and i have had the opportunity to meet many of them here in charlotte. not all cops are like this guy, but the ones that are in it for the opportunity to throw their weight around. kinda like the guys that drive 'vettes, they're compensating for something...[:)]
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 6:04:23 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 6:29:36 AM EDT
I can't believe the guy was convicted. I think he deserved it, but in the few cases locally, including two where an off-duty officer beat a suspect to death, the officers weren't even charged. I guess the guy's previous two incidents (mentioned in the last paragraph) were what did him in.z
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 6:34:02 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Jarhead_22: Dillards stores here in Texas have had a big problem using off duty police officers as security as well. A few have tried to roust suspected shoplifters (when the officers have not actually witnessed the suspects select, take and hide the merchandise, then attempt to leave without paying) and were ignored or in some way "disrespected" by the suspects. This led to the officers laying hands or, in some cases, batons on people, with sometimes disastrous results, as in the case noted above. In some cases, no shoplifted merchandise was found in the possession of the suspects in the aftermath of the scuffle. The problem lies in the difference between the very aggressive nature of police work and the highly regulated and constrained nature of loss prevention/security work. Police officers moonlighting in security in many cases have failed to transition from one method of operation to the other when working off duty security jobs.
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You nailed it JH22 In this case, add in his alledged excessive force past. Not good.
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 6:39:56 AM EDT
[s]I effing hate cops[/s] Oh, wait...let me read the story. Hmm....definitely sad. Sounds like Jarhead_22 hit the nail on the head. There's a big difference between pinching a shoplifter and taking down a heavily armed bank robber. [b]Every[/b] time you enter into a physical confrontation with somebody, there's a chance of death or serious injury.
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 7:01:44 AM EDT
Typical! But don't worry! These same Cops are the ones who swear they WILL "Do the right thing" when the time comes! [puke] Yeah.....riiiiggghhtttt!
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 7:07:35 AM EDT
so how do you take down a crack fiend that may be armed?
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 8:02:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 8:07:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Scottman: Wills was high on heroin and cocaine, and had stuffed a $159 leather coat under his windbreaker.
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That's not an easy suspect to restrain. Tough call.
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 8:09:42 AM EDT
so if the crack fiend is stealing less than say $200.00 it's ok to let him go? that's wrong. you got to take him down. i guess you just don't "buffalo" him so hard you crack his skull.
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 8:17:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/14/2003 8:35:46 AM EDT by Pat-Riot]
Rethought my post on this one. Having dealt with individuals on these substances as a bouncer, I know it is difficult to handle them but it is your job to do so in a manner that keeps the club from getting sued, and keeps you outta jail. Sometimes you get cut and hit, most of the time you don't. Due to the nature of what these drugs do to their bodies, if somebody is "speedballing" like that guy was he should have been too screwed up to matter much in a physical confrontation. Officer "Body Slam" was a cowboy, and I would think that good cops would be glad to have his taint gone from your ranks, rather than trying to defend his out of control behavior.
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 8:18:07 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 8:31:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/14/2003 8:33:08 AM EDT by Ken226]
If all crackheads were handled in the same manner, we wouldn't have a crackhead problem.
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 8:37:14 AM EDT
Yeah, we'd have a lawsuit problem.
Link Posted: 5/14/2003 9:05:59 AM EDT
[b]Three employees of the Randall Park Mall Dillard's store who saw the two men scuffle said the muscular Talley picked up Wills, 41, and threw him head-first to a concrete floor. Wills' skull was fractured in two places, his collarbone was broken, and his brain was fatally bruised. He died two days later. Talley, moonlighting as a security guard, said he slipped while trying to handcuff Wills, and they fell together to the floor. [/b] From the testimony here he was a bit out control. You see that stuff on wrestling on TV, in a ring. But I think anyone knows that throwing someone down onto concrete headfirst can be fatal, or cause serious brain injuries. Not just one but three witnesses testified that he threw him down, contradicting his claim that he fell down with the guy. There is a pattern showing up of this guy lying about the amount of force he is using. I think the public and the police force are better off with his absence from the force.
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