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Posted: 5/9/2003 6:03:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/9/2003 7:54:15 AM EDT by BenDover]
Is using the EPA the next wave of subversive tactics anti-gunners will use to get ranges closed? Last time I checked, lead came from..... the ground. [url]http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2003/05/09/loc_libertylead09.html[/url]
Subdivision site 'hazardous' ----------------------------------------------- Lexington Manor declared Superfund site By Jennifer Edwards The Cincinnati Enquirer LIBERTY TWP. - A subdivision under federal scrutiny because of lead contamination from an old skeet-shooting range has been declared a Superfund site. That will trigger a cleanup that is expected to begin this summer. Superfund status means the subdivision, Lexington Manor off Millikin Road, is now considered a hazardous-waste site and "a time critical removal action" of the lead is necessary, said Steven Renninger, the on-scene coordinator in the Superfund division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Cincinnati office. "We want to move as quickly as we can to get this work done," Renninger said. "There is a threat to public health or the environment." The cleanup likely will last months and include sampling yards, to determine which ones are contaminated, and excavation of the lead-contaminated soil. The U.S. EPA can make the parties responsible for the contamination pay for the cleanup and is in negotiations with them. The EPA wants the parties, Ryland Homes, the subdivision's builder, and Lexington Manor Inc., the developer, to sign a federal consent decree that will outline the cleanup plan, which the EPA will oversee. The announcement came Thursday night at a meeting EPA officials held with Lexington Manor residents to update them on the investigation. Earlier Thursday, the EPA had its first meeting with representatives from Ryland Homes and Lexington Manor Inc. Renninger said the meeting was "very productive," and he was encouraged the two parties would quickly work with the EPA to resolve the problem. No cost has been estimated. In a phone interview late Thursday, a Ryland official agreed. "We have the same goals in mind and we look forward to a continued productive process and expect to come to an agreement and sign the consent decree," said Anne Madison, a Ryland spokeswoman. "Our intent from the very beginning is to make this situation right." Lexington Manor residents said they, too, were encouraged by the developments. They were, however, alarmed to hear Thursday from the EPA that arsenic, which also is hazardous, recently was found in lead shot pellets that are in at least one yard, and that a sample the EPA took in a yard detected a hazardous lead level of 72,000 parts per million (ppm). The maximum standard for lead levels in bare soil areas is 400 ppm. Dozens of other samples also have detected high lead levels. "We have one daughter, and I am real concerned now," said Kristine Twardowski, 38. "We have 37 kids in our neighborhood and a few more on the way. We also aren't happy that our yards will be torn up, but we do feel we don't have a choice on this." Lead at Lexington Manor became an issue late last year when a soil test from a yard turned up high lead levels. Residents contacted the Ohio EPA, which launched an investigation. Exposure to lead can lead to behavioral disorders, brain damage or death. Ryland paid for two rounds of soil testing and was about to begin a third when the Ohio EPA asked the U.S. EPA to head the testing last month. Meanwhile, 19 Lexington Manor families have sued Ryland, Lexington Manor Inc. and others involved in the lead remediation. The families want punitive damages and the land properly tested and cleaned. Some also want Ryland to buy back their homes, which range from $190,000 to $330,000. But the residents are most upset, they say, that Ryland did not tell them about the lead from lead pellets and that the 25-acre site used to hold a skeet-shooting range. Ryland officials knew previous high lead levels existed. But, they stress, they had been assured concerns over lead contamination had been properly addressed and the land was safe for homes.
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Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:18:02 AM EDT
I'd hate to be the developer, or the previous landowner. If the previous owner knowingly with-held the information that it used to be a skeet/trap site, he's in for a world of hurt. If the developer knew, and developed anyways...he's screwed. I thought soil tests were mandatory for new builds now? They should have found this out when they broke ground for the first house.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:20:05 AM EDT
If I am not mistaken, there was a gun club in Avon or Bay Village Ohio that had a skeet and trapp range out over Lake Erie. They were forced to close because of the lead 'contaminating' Lake Erie. If lead pellets are an issue, scrape up the topsoil and start over... better yet, stop eating the dirt, and you will have nothing to worry about.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:23:33 AM EDT
Without reading the whole article, let me guess..... Ryland Homes ???
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:28:04 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:32:58 AM EDT
I hate developers. Clearly the way to thwart them is to build more shooting ranges. Let's get that lead into the soil to preserve America's natural beauty. [;D]
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:37:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By marvl: I hate developers. Clearly the way to thwart them is to build more shooting ranges. Let's get that lead into the soil to preserve America's natural beauty. [;D]
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No shit, maybe now they'll stop tearing down shooting ranges to build new subdivisions. But if is wasn't for all the developers, where would all the Californians and Texans live when they move to your lovely state???[;)]
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:41:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Maynard:
Originally Posted By illigb: If I am not mistaken, there was a gun club in Avon or Bay Village Ohio that had a skeet and trapp range out over Lake Erie. They were forced to close because of the lead 'contaminating' Lake Erie. If lead pellets are an issue, scrape up the topsoil and start over... better yet, stop eating the dirt, and you will have nothing to worry about.
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Wonder how Camp Perry survives if that is the case. There's quite a bit of lead landing in Lake Erie during Nationals.
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I often wonder about how long it will be until the enviro-wackos will be picketing to have Camp Perry shut down...
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:51:06 AM EDT
If you are to use a metal detector on either side of I-95 in Virginia from Richmond to Alexandria, you would find Civil War bullets by the ton...all lead yet no one is claiming this to be a hazard... Again, this is another example of junk science. Sure it can be detected in ppm...you could probably detect these pellets with a metal detector...but even eating the dirt would be of little to no hazard. In most tilled soils, the density of lead makes the pellets sink to the hardpan where the interaction with water is so slight, the natural oxidation of the surface of the lead prevents the lead from dissolving.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:29:32 AM EDT
I swallowed a fishing sinker one time and I turned out fine. 'Junk Science' is right.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:40:52 AM EDT
That is the same reason we now use steel shot to hunt waterfowl. Typical soil testing done prior to construction would not turn up anything about lead contamination. That would be for soil structural stability and, if not on public sanitary sewer, for soil type. An Environmental Impact Study would have turned up the prior use of the site. But, that is not always required.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:51:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/9/2003 7:53:03 AM EDT by anothergene]
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:56:43 AM EDT
I can forsee legislation that gun ranges must certify with the EPA to stay open. They'll put a huge license cost on it.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 8:19:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Torf: I swallowed a fishing sinker one time and I turned out fine.
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That would be open for discussion! [nana] Av.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 9:16:46 AM EDT
Did they actually find any lead pellets? It's possible that the natural lead level in the soil is that high.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 9:46:23 AM EDT
Spread lime to tie the lead up - this is the method being used to mitigate target berms at rifle ranges in the US. [Don't ask me about the chemistry - do a search in google.]
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 9:51:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By BenDover: I can forsee legislation that gun ranges must certify with the EPA to stay open. They'll put a huge license cost on it.
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I wouldn't bet against this.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 9:59:44 AM EDT
This is a shot across our bow, guys. A warning to all ranges. Some states have programs concerning range remediation and procedures right now. I urge you to get your club looking into this now, to avoid trouble in the future.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 10:13:28 AM EDT
For lead to be a problem, it must be present in soluable form. How does this occur in nature? For waterfowl, injestion of pellets would concentrate in the gizzard where mastication takes place via intentionally injested rock. In this case, the pellets acted like rocks and were ground into very fine particles which caused the poisioning. But in the ground, shotgun pellets are NOT a problem unless you grind the soil AND treat it with a strong acid to liberate the Pb ions. Its unlikely this will ever happen. Soluable Pb salts are acetic, nitric, chloride and a few others...none of the acids occur in natural ground conditions. Acid rain is possible but by the time the rain hits most ground, its neutralized. Typically, a high pH (alkaline) prevents lead from being a hazard. Furthermore, shotgun pellets land with very little force and thusly, do not disintegrate like a pistol or rifle bullet hitting a berm. The pellets are all very similar in size and should be very easy to remove from the topsoil via inductive seperation methods.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 10:50:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/9/2003 11:30:46 AM EDT by RiffRandall]
Originally Posted By Keith_J: For lead to be a problem, it must be present in soluable form. How does this occur in nature?
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Soluable Pb salts are acetic, nitric, chloride and a few others...none of the acids occur in natural ground conditions. Acid rain is possible but by the time the rain hits most ground, its neutralized. Typically, a high pH (alkaline) prevents lead from being a hazard.
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I have read somewhere that lead plumbing is perfectly safe normally, as the lead pipes form an oxidized coating that prevents contamination. The problem is that flouride (& chlorine, etc) that is added to the water supply eats away the oxidized layer. Not a chemist nor do I play one on TV but does this sound legit or is it just tinfoil beanie/Black Helicopter talk [peep]
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 10:57:38 AM EDT
Perfectly legit...lead has been used in plumbing since the dawn of time, hence its name auf Latin of plumbium and resultant chemical symbol of Pb. Where it caused problems was with joint with more noble metals...it became anodic and thusly would dissolve. Not too many metals are more noble but there are a few. Chlorine and flourine can cause ion solvation...hence, lead is no longer used in potable water systems. Want a roof that lasts forever? Lead. It will get hail pocks but will not leak. It doesn't sound like a tin roof either. Lead phobes are everywhere...they deserve lead poisioning at high velocity.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 11:26:00 AM EDT
OK, so lead in the ground is a danger? Where do they think the lead came from in the first place?z
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 11:31:24 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 11:49:48 AM EDT
Not really...galena, the principal ore of lead (lead sulfide), is found in surface as well as subsurface strata. Its a typical precious metal by-product and is found in areas of precious metal mining. Spent shotgun pellets in normally alkaline soils is NOT a problem but people will think its significant. A leaking lead-acid battery is more of a lead hazard than shotgun pellets.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 12:43:33 PM EDT
Shucks that's nuthin'.... what about that land developer in "Poltergeist" ?
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