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Posted: 10/30/2002 7:13:58 PM EDT
Driving down the road the other day and I spot, of all things, a ground strap. Ya know, that little strap that hangs from under the car and drags on the ground. I think it had something to do with static electricity. But this was on a brand new Lincoln. Whats up? Didn't these go out with curb feelers?
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 7:28:39 PM EDT
And how come gasoline tankers don't have them anymore?
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 7:31:44 PM EDT
hmm, somehow thought this post was about scruples.
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 7:35:28 PM EDT
And I thought you were talking about Virgins!! [sex]
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 7:42:11 PM EDT
Well, I guess there were a lot of things that disappeared in the 60s. But between grounding straps, scruples, and virgins, I think the last two disappeared about the same time. [:)]
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 9:45:41 PM EDT
I seem to recall they were popular with the low-rider crowd well into the 70's down in Los Angeles. I haven't seen them since.
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 9:50:32 PM EDT
I thought you were talking about these dumbasses: [img]http://dc.indymedia.org/local/webcast/uploads/metafiles/mjb2002-10-26-antiwar054.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 9:51:06 PM EDT
It depends on where you live and what kind of tires you have if you need them now or not. Dry areas such as leiward side of mountains and too much vulcanization in the rubber in tires cause alot more static electricity. So you can either get outa the car and ground and zap yourself, or get the straps to ground when you drive. Last I knew JC Whitneys still sells them.
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 9:52:32 PM EDT
Ya know, I wouldn't rule out the possibility of them coming back in vogue (ground straps, that is). Listened to a fellow from the American Petroleum Safety Society on a local radio talk show a few months ago who said that static-induced car fires at gasoline filling stations remain a significant problem. (The boom in self-serve gas pumps may be a contributing factor, since the static spark is often generated by the driver sliding across the seat on his way out of the vehicle.) Then, just yesterday I watched a news segment about it (on spanish-language TV, no less). Take all the recent (and exaggerated, IMHO) concern about auto safety, factor in a high-dollar lawsuit settlement or two, and you may be able to look forward to ground straps joining daytime headlamps, ABS and side-curtain air bags on the list of semi-useful safety "features" offered by automakers.
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 9:57:28 PM EDT
Automakers seem to be moving to higher voltage electrical systems in cars. I've heard 36V. At some point a better ground may have advantages for things like common mode noise on vehicular data busses etc.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 9:38:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/1/2002 4:25:50 PM EDT by Arock]
Once again AR15.com proves prescient... This is on MSNBC (I know...) today: [img]http://images.ibsys.com/2002/1101/1753148_200X150.jpg[/img] [url]www.msnbc.com/local/kxas/A1374685.asp[/url] [b]NBC 5 Special Report: Danger At The Pump FORT WORTH, Texas, 12:07 p.m. CST November 1, 2002 - Simple static electricity is being blamed for sparking several gas station explosions by igniting fuel fumes.[/b]
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 9:46:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Arock: Automakers seem to be moving to higher voltage electrical systems in cars. I've heard 36V. At some point a better ground may have advantages for things like common mode noise on vehicular data busses etc.
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I'd like to see them go to a positive ground, too, like some of the old British sports cars had. Add in unmarked, non color coded battery terminals, and sit back and watch the fun.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 10:21:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By marvl: I'd like to see them go to a positive ground, too, like some of the old British sports cars had. Add in unmarked, non color coded battery terminals, and sit back and watch the fun.
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You are an evil, sick man.[:D]
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 10:52:55 AM EDT
Better get your ground straps quick! I hear Congress is about to ban them... Just send me $49.95 plus $9.50 for shipping....
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 10:56:10 AM EDT
Watch em fuel a plane sometime and you will see grounding straps being used as the first step in refueling.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 11:17:03 AM EDT
LOL. I thought the same thing this past Wedensday as I was behind a car with New Brunswick tags and it had a ground strap on it. [>:/]
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 11:21:57 AM EDT
ESD-induces fuel fires? I guess that's why I've always had the habit of touching the metal pump body before I grab the hose. Considering all the cross-country driving I do, I have considered providing for a ground chain in some places, as I have been "zapped" a few times grounding out at the pump... Yes, I know about the grounding of AC when fueling - I've done it more than a few times myself... FFZ
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 11:24:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/1/2002 11:28:53 AM EDT by raf]
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 4:08:02 PM EDT
Those red plastic gas cans in those really convenient plastic truck bed liners. They have been blamed for many vehicles fires. BTW, we always had to hook up the grounding strap before refilling our M60A3 tanks.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 4:21:33 PM EDT
I believe the static that causes those fires is generated by pumping the fuel. The ground strap used when fueling aircraft is to eliminate the potential difference between the pump and the vehicle, not the vehicle and the ground. Ground straps on the car may prevent that but I dont know. Not positive on the above statements.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 4:39:34 PM EDT
Not really related to ground straps, but I sometimes see trains with chains dangling beneath them, dragging along on the tracks. What's the purpose of these? Wouldn't these increase the possibility of a spark igniting a fuel car?
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 4:48:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 7:16:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Striker:
Originally Posted By osprey21: LOL. I thought the same thing this past Wedensday as I was behind a car with New Brunswick tags and it had a ground strap on it. [>:/]
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We's a little [s]backwards[/s] nostalgic up here in the Maritimes! [:D]
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LOL !
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 7:40:59 AM EDT
Ground straps to prevent static, I can understand the logic. But why in my area its a big no no to use a cell phone at the pump? Is there a lot of static electricity with that? I actually had a cashier of an Exxon come yelling "Sir, your going to have to turn your cell phone off while your pumping!" I guess there is a good reason for it, I just don't know what it is.
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 7:45:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Skibane: Then, just yesterday I watched a news segment about it (on spanish-language TV, no less).
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"twodae in da noose, me amigo' don hexploded hez cheby at de petro stashun. dez is da furd hesploshun dees munf. don be slidin cross de tuck ana roll deen grabin da pump , see.?"
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 11:09:30 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Venerated: Not really related to ground straps, but I sometimes see trains with chains dangling beneath them, dragging along on the tracks. What's the purpose of these? Wouldn't these increase the possibility of a spark igniting a fuel car?
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I've seen chains on fuel tanks of 18 wheelers. I used to drive myself but noone filled me in on the purpose of this.
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 11:29:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 12:37:08 PM EDT
When filling any gas can (for the mower or whatever), REMOVE IT from the vehicle you carried it to the station in and set it on the ground before you get the nozzle anywhere near it. I've seen it twice - once at a race track when a guy was adding fuel to his race car (plastic fuel cell in car on trailer, being filled from a plastic can held by the guy standing on the ground) and once at a gas station when a guy tried to fill a can in the back of his non-bedliner equipped pickup truck. Both of these guys got burned pretty badly and their vehicles were destroyed. BE CAREFUL! Gasoline is dangerous stuff.
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 2:41:21 PM EDT
We can't use a cell phone at work [oil refinery]. Its considered an ignition source. We can use them in the dry shack tho.
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