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Posted: 8/28/2002 6:42:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/28/2002 7:00:02 PM EDT by Citabria7GCBC]
i have to quote some people on what they think about "the classics." the classics being books not movies. i just have to get enough info on ya'lls take about what you think about classics. thanks guys.
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 6:48:47 PM EDT
well, its a good read, but depending on what you're doing, you may want to get the latest copy of TM 9-1005-249-10.
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 6:49:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/28/2002 7:10:43 PM EDT by the_reject]
Shakespeare is good once you get past Romeo and Juliet - King Lear is awesome, Hamlet is decent, and Titus is by far my favorite. The Iliad and the Odyssey were alright, but I didn't prefer them. Now Beowulf - that's a great one. Canterbury Tales is boring as hell - Chaucer can go sod off. As can Charles Dickens, that silly git. Dante Alighieri - now there's a man with great literary skills. Reminds me: I should probably re-read Inferno. the_reject
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 6:52:05 PM EDT
i am looking for stuff similar to the "Anid," "odyssy", and shakespeare. stuff like that.
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 6:57:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/28/2002 6:58:47 PM EDT by MAHABALI]
Aenid, odyssey, Illiad, Voltair's Candide, Goeth's Faust, Don Quixote, Dante, Oedipus, all very good..
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 6:58:21 PM EDT
you can quote me if you want. "they were the worst peices of S I have ever held. I actually used my old college lit books to start my fireplace." Kevin
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 7:12:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 7:43:30 PM EDT
Moby Dick Last of the Mohicans Robinson Crusoe All considered classics. All good reading.
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 7:49:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/28/2002 7:51:12 PM EDT by Nimrod1193]
My personal favorites: The Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe. Shakespear's [i]Henry V[/i] and [i]MacBeth[/i]. Machiavelli's [i]The Prince[/i].
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 7:52:34 PM EDT
give it up. who cares. go grab a fifth and enjoy yourself. life's too short to spend it writing papers.... j/k. but not really.
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 8:00:36 PM EDT
The classics in my opinion are good for a multiplicity of reasons. One, they are able to tell a story that seems crystal clear and fresh at the same time. Two, they are able to teach us about society when the books were written, or are able to tell us about the morals of the day. Three, they are able to teach us that literature, like age can be appreciated more as it matures into something that future generations can learn from. Four, they are able to impart different styles upon the reader, who may in fact take up writing novels. Novels can inspire us through our imaginations to write for future generations in hopes that they will appreciate our work like we appreciate the work of generations prior to us. Lastly, novels are good for timber if they are kept properly dry since college.
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 8:22:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/28/2002 8:22:53 PM EDT by Zardoz]
My favorites are (in no certain order):[left]The Iliad[/left][left]The Odyssey[/left][left]Last of the Mohicans[/left][left]any Shakespeare[/left][left]most Dickens[/left][left]some Edgar Allen Poe[/left][left]well, maybe they are in order, looking at them.......[/left]
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 8:26:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Balzac72: The classics in my opinion are good for a multiplicity of reasons. One, they are able to tell a story that seems crystal clear and fresh at the same time. Two, they are able to teach us about society when the books were written, or are able to tell us about the morals of the day. Three, they are able to teach us that literature, like age can be appreciated more as it matures into something that future generations can learn from. Four, they are able to impart different styles upon the reader, who may in fact take up writing novels. Novels can inspire us through our imaginations to write for future generations in hopes that they will appreciate our work like we appreciate the work of generations prior to us. Lastly, novels are good for timber if they are kept properly dry since college.
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thank you! you are the one who have given me something to work with. i intend to quote you...once again thanks.
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 8:30:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/28/2002 8:33:30 PM EDT by raven]
I used to go to a college where the manditory curriculum were the Great Books. They're read and discussed in roughly chronological order over 4 years. This is what's mandated by experts on the Great Books, to be read and discussed over the short 4 year college term. [url]http://www.sjcsf.edu/academic/seminar_list_02-03.htm[/url] I wanted to do this for my college education because in just 5-10 years, the knowledge you get from standard univeristy courses will be expanded on, maybe even made obsolete. They start you in baby steps in undergrad studies, expecting you to get to the cutting edge and serious scholarship in postgrad studies. In big schools, the top experts won't even deign to teach you. They leave that to grad students. The Great Books program's different, because the tutors in your class consider themselves students too, just very advanced ones. The greatest experts willing to teach go to St. John's, where they're immune from the usual politics and political correctness found in modern academics. They study the same texts as the students alongside them. These books are the pinnacle of Western thought and intellectual achievement. It's not pablum or watered down; they're the original texts written by the brilliant pioneers that have shaped and described our greatest ideas. I ditched this program because I couldn't afford it, and it was the biggest mistake of my life. I regret nothing in life so much as leaving St. John's College. It is a very special place.
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 8:32:46 PM EDT
Just two off the top of my head: Shakespeare - he worked with the English language the way Michelangelo worked with marble. Edgar Allen Poe - such incredible efficiency of words. Like "The Tell-Tale Heart" or "The Cask of Amontillado" - you could not take a single sentence out of those works without destroying the entire work.
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 8:36:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/28/2002 9:02:29 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ilikelegs: No one has said anything about the "Epic of Gilgemesh". The first historic recorded literary hero story. Read it! Kind of like a modern "Sinbad" but written during the Sumarian Dynasty.
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that story is incomplete technically. but overall its a great epic!
Link Posted: 8/29/2002 2:41:20 PM EDT
Citabria, no problem, I kinda thought the thread was going off topic! Good luck with the paper and make sure you use my last line as a quote!
Link Posted: 8/29/2002 5:42:18 PM EDT
thanks for all your help guys.....i got a 100 on the paper.
Link Posted: 8/31/2002 5:59:39 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Citabria7GCBC: thanks for all your help guys.....i got a 100 on the paper.
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High school, college? Congrats!
Link Posted: 8/31/2002 6:26:15 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DoubleFeed: Classics? Down here in the South, "Classics" mean different things. Smoky and the Bandit, Bullit, Gator. Thems classics, boy. Dukes of Hazzard is in the running.
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Doublefeed, you are too much!!! LoL
Link Posted: 8/31/2002 7:33:38 PM EDT
Mensa'a Henway. Bob [8D]
Link Posted: 9/1/2002 4:50:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By raven: I used to go to a college where the manditory curriculum were the Great Books. They're read and discussed in roughly chronological order over 4 years. This is what's mandated by experts on the Great Books, to be read and discussed over the short 4 year college term. [url]http://www.sjcsf.edu/academic/seminar_list_02-03.htm[/url] Me too. Glad to hear others who shared at least some of that experience. But I can say that I have not stopped using what I learned, and that is, how to learn. A day when you don't learn at least one new thing is a day wasted. I wanted to do this for my college education because in just 5-10 years, the knowledge you get from standard univeristy courses will be expanded on, maybe even made obsolete. They start you in baby steps in undergrad studies, expecting you to get to the cutting edge and serious scholarship in postgrad studies. In big schools, the top experts won't even deign to teach you. They leave that to grad students. The Great Books program's different, because the tutors in your class consider themselves students too, just very advanced ones. The greatest experts willing to teach go to St. John's, where they're immune from the usual politics and political correctness found in modern academics. They study the same texts as the students alongside them. These books are the pinnacle of Western thought and intellectual achievement. It's not pablum or watered down; they're the original texts written by the brilliant pioneers that have shaped and described our greatest ideas. I ditched this program because I couldn't afford it, and it was the biggest mistake of my life. I regret nothing in life so much as leaving St. John's College. It is a very special place.
View Quote
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