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Posted: 8/6/2002 8:22:30 AM EDT
[url=http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020806/wl_nm/japan_hiroshima_dc_1]Hiroshima Hits 'Pax Americana' at A-Bomb Memorial[/url]
HIROSHIMA, Japan (Reuters) - The mayor of Hiroshima marked the anniversary of the world's first atomic bombing with a sharp rebuke for what critics charge is President Bush's unilateral diplomacy -- and an invitation to Bush to visit the city destroyed in a nuclear inferno 57 years ago. The anniversary comes days after a reminder that Japan -- which has made much of its status as the only nation to suffer a nuclear attack -- was researching an atomic bomb during World War II, and just months after a top politician hinted Tokyo might someday abandon its decades-old ban on nuclear weapons. The Peace Bell tolled at 8:15 a.m. -- the precise moment the Enola Gay B-29 warplane dropped the bomb on August 6, 1945 -- as the crowd stood and bowed their heads for a minute of silence in the still summer heat. The United States dropped a second atomic bomb on the southern city of Nagasaki on August 9. Six days later, Japan surrendered. [red]Hiroshima Mayor Tadatoshi Akiba lamented the world's growing tendency to forget the horrors of the atomic bomb[/red] and warned his audience that the dangers of nuclear war were rising. "For the victims of the atomic bomb...once again, a hot and bitter summer has returned," Akiba said. "With the return of the heat, the memories of that misery also return. "What is even more bitter is that those memories are fading from the world," he said. He added that the possibility of history's repeating itself had grown since the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington. Akiba invited Bush to Hiroshima "to confirm with his own eyes what nuclear weapons can do to human beings" and lashed out at Washington's go-it-alone stance. "America has not been given the right to impose a 'Pax Americana' and to decide the fate of the world," Akiba said. "Rather, we, the people of the world, have the right to insist that we have not given you the authority to destroy the world." JAPAN'S NUCLEAR STANCE [red]While Japan each year solemnly mourns its own war dead, less attention is paid to the victims of its military aggression and hardly any to the fact that its own military was engaged in research on an atomic bomb during World War II.[/red] In a small but timely reminder of that research, the Asahi Shimbun newspaper said at the weekend that secret documents on Japan's nuclear efforts, taken out of the country in 1949, had been returned to the institute in charge of the research. Historians have long known about the research, although how much progress was made is a subject of debate. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasuo Fukuda, a close Koizumi aide, came under fire in June for hinting Japan might revise its "three non-nuclear principles" adopted in 1971.
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[i]Hiroshima Mayor Tadatoshi Akiba lamented the world's growing [b]tendency to forget the horrors of the atomic bomb[/b]...[/i] I wonder if they commemmorate "Pearl Harbor Day" or "Bataan Death March Day" or "Nanjing Massacre Day" or "Chinese And Korean Sex Slaves For Jap Troops Day" or "Torture of Tens Of Thousands of Allied Prisoners Day" or "Thousands of Biological Experiments on Chinese Prisoners Day" [pissed] [b]Bataan Death March:[/b] [img]http://ghostofbataan.com/image2/deathmarch.jpg[/img] [img]http://www.terracom.net/~vfwpost/bataandb2.jpg[/img] [b]Nanjing Massacre:[/b] [img]http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~dyue/wiihist/njmassac/nmphoto/orphan_s.jpg[/img] [img]http://vikingphoenix.com/public/JapanIncorporated/1895-1945/behead.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 8:27:25 AM EDT
Hooray for our side ! After fighting on Guadlcanal and Iwo Jima ,my Uncle Steve would only have one thing to say " Semper Fi "
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 8:43:07 AM EDT
Hooray for Col. Paul Tibbets
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 9:13:28 AM EDT
I got a friend who was a Marine and was stationed near Hiroshima. He said there's a museum and everything, but the Japanese gloss over their aggression, and don't even mention ANY of the atrocities committed during and before the war. My buddy ended up marrying a 1/2 Japanese girl that had lived there all her life. She had NO idea about Pearl Harbor or Nanking or ANY of that. Their children are NOT taught any of it, and consequently, have little to NO understanding of why American troops are stationed there.
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 9:15:03 AM EDT
The anniversary comes days after a reminder that Japan -- which has made much of its status as the only nation to suffer a nuclear attack -- was researching an atomic bomb during World War II, and just months after a top politician hinted Tokyo might someday abandon its decades-old ban on nuclear weapons.
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??????? Did anyone get a red flag response on that comment? What da hell does that mean? I thought it was part of the WWII peace agreement. Lord knows..thats all we need. Japan with a Nuke and high tech knowledge....I bet they're working on it right now. I swear...each day, the tempest gets closer. [b][blue]NAKED[/blue][/b]
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 9:23:37 AM EDT
Originally Posted By The_Macallan: I wonder if they commemmorate "Pearl Harbor Day" or "Bataan Death March Day" or "Nanjing Massacre Day" or "Chinese And Korean Sex Slaves For Jap Troops Day" or "Torture of Tens Of Thousands of Allied Prisoners Day" or "Thousands of Biological Experiments on Chinese Prisoners Day" [pissed] [b]Bataan Death March:[/b] [url]http://ghostofbataan.com/image2/deathmarch.jpg[/url] [url]http://www.terracom.net/~vfwpost/bataandb2.jpg[/url]
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I can't help but not take the statements decrying the Hiroshima bombing very seriously. My grandfather, and Indian, after getting married was posted to Malaya to set up the first insurance company there. Malaya was a British colony then. Then the Japanese invaded, en masse and on bicycles no less, and kicked Brit asses big time. Everything was locked down, and my grandparents home was used to house Japanese soldiers. My grandfather managed to get his wife on a boat to India where she was able to return to her parents home. My grandfather though was taken on a great long walk to Burma, laying a railway along the way. He eventually met up with the Bataan group. For six years he walked around South East Asia, I'm guessing in chains. I can't imagine the countless friends he must have made along the way, and the countless friends he'd have had to see die along the way. He eventually managed to escape, and no surprise, walked all the way back to Malaya. The bomb dropped, the Japs left, the Brits returned, and he gained access to telecommunications facilities. My grandmother in that six years had no idea whether he was dead or alive. He brought her back from India, and they returned to their house. They then started having children, their only daughter being sent to UPenn after she was done with school. That daughter is my mom. In my grandparents house, they had this fairly large solid teak wood dining table. This was used by the occupying soldiers as a multipurpose workbench, to cook and eat and torture/kill Malayans and clean their weapons and to write. Marks on the table and the equipment left there attested to that sort of thing. My grandparents had it refinished when they returned to the house and had used it as their dining table. After my grandfathers death, my mom had it sent to our home where we refinished it, and I grew up eating playing and doing my homework on that table. I now have that table, and use it as my dining table. It's as if this entire story is in the grain of the teak. How did I even get started on this? Ah well.
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 9:31:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Matthew_Q: I got a friend who was a Marine and was stationed near Hiroshima. He said there's a museum and everything, but the Japanese gloss over their aggression, and don't even mention ANY of the atrocities committed during and before the war. My buddy ended up marrying a 1/2 Japanese girl that had lived there all her life. She had NO idea about Pearl Harbor or Nanking or ANY of that. Their children are NOT taught any of it, and consequently, have little to NO understanding of why American troops are stationed there.
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Your buddy must have been stationed at MCAS Iwakuni. I was there from Oct. 83 to Oct. 85. I had a long relationship with a girl who lived and worked in Hiroshima and got to know the city nearly as well as my home town. We really didn't discuss the wat, the bomb or who did what to whom. After dating a year and a half I had no idea what she was taught about all of it. I liked the people. I found them to be very pro American. They embraced our culture and admired us as a people. The fact that they have their own culture and their own ways of dealing with their past does not in my opinion reflect poorly on them. We choose to down play our atrocities as well. The Mayor of Hiroshima is a politician. Like any politician he has an agenda and speaks to a particular group of people. We shouldn't forget the past and we shouldn't let it stand in our way either. Second to the South Koreans, the Japanese are our most important allies in the far east.
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 9:39:42 AM EDT
Made in America, Tested in Japan [:D]
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 10:27:18 AM EDT
I love the fact that we so decisively hit the Japanese that they still to this day have no will or inclination to fight a war ever again. That's the kind of bitchslap only America can hand out, but sadly I think we'll never see that kind of resolve again. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 10:51:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas: I love the fact that we so decisively hit the Japanese that they still to this day have no will or inclination to fight a war ever again. That's the kind of bitchslap only America can hand out, but sadly I think we'll never see that kind of resolve again.
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[chainsawkill] [^]
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 11:01:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/6/2002 11:28:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
Originally Posted By sesat_ram: I now have that table, and use it as my dining table. It's as if this entire story is in the grain of the teak. How did I even get started on this? Ah well.
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REALLY fascinating story, SR. Thanks for sharing it. I appreciate your time typing it. Thanks again! [:)]
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I also enjoyed it,thank you.
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