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Posted: 7/22/2002 12:15:11 PM EDT
I want to have a pad for a carport & a patio poured. Does anyone have an idea of how to estimate the amount of concrete & how much the concrete will cost me? The patio will be appx 15' x 30ft & the carport pad will be 20' x 20'. I would guess it should be 4" thick. Thanks
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:20:49 PM EDT
Patio: 15x30'x4"= 6 cubic yards of concrete. Carport: 20x20'x4.5" (and 2-4" thicker around edges)= 6 yards of concrete. Crete usually goes for around $74-$85/yard for material only. Use 3500lb. test concrete.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:24:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Wobblin-Goblin: Patio: 15x30'x4"= 6 cubic yards of concrete. Carport: 20x20'x4.5" (and 2-4" thicker around edges)= 6 yards of concrete. Crete usually goes for around $74-$85/yard for material only. Use 3500lb. test concrete.
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Damn. That was fast. Thank you very much. Scott
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:25:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:29:16 PM EDT
you might want to consider reinforcing the carport slab, at the least, as well. #3 rebars at 18" apart, each way, should do nicely.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:31:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/22/2002 12:32:15 PM EDT by Gun-fan]
Originally Posted By ArmedAggie: you might want to consider reinforcing the carport slab, at the least, as well. #3 rebars at 18" apart, each way, should do nicely.
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I was gonna use take off Remington 700 barrels. Just kidding. I do know a custom rifle maker that did just that. They had no value to him.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:32:08 PM EDT
I guess that could work.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:33:17 PM EDT
How many cubic yards are in a truck load?
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:39:51 PM EDT
They generally haul 8-10 yards. I think they can get up to 12 or so on a normal truck, but usually haul only 8-10 yards.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:42:13 PM EDT
general rule of thumb $1.00 per 1 sq. ft. concrete only no labor. 15 X 30 = 450 450sq. ft X $1/sq.ft.= $450 You can add fiber to the concrete and skip the rebar. The fiber strands hold the concrete together. Remember the when the Israelis were held captive by pharoah and the Egyptians and they started asking to be free, the taskmasters took away the straw and made them collect their own straw.(they understood the concept thousands of years ago) One of my projects at my former job was to relocate some equipment. When I had the equipment in place I called the concrete guy and he suggested extra fiber and no-rebar.(very labor intensive pour) We were taught in school to use the rebar for heavy loads. I went against my instinct and let him leave out the rebar and use fiber. Long story short: that was about 4 years ago and 10,000# hysters drive across it for maintenance and it has not cracked yet. Average car or truck= 4,000#? and yes ask for the 3,500psi not the 2,000.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:43:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Gun-fan: How many cubic yards are in a truck load?
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Depends on the type of trucks they use in SC and how restrictive the weight laws are. Generally 10-10.5 yds. is the max these days. BTW, do not simply ask for a patio mix. That's like calling up an Italian restaurant and asking for pizza. Use specifics. 3500lb. test with pea-stone. If you want added protection against separation ([i]all[/i] concrete cracks eventually), you can use wire mesh (get the 5x10' sheets, not the rolls of wire) or better yet, ask for fibermesh in the mix of concrete. It usually goes for $7-$10/yard.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:44:12 PM EDT
If you are doing the work yourself it usually pays to call and ask about the costs to get the concrete. Most times there is little savings in getting less than what a company considers their normal, full load. So, it might be worth it to just get a full truck and find a spot to put in some new sidewalk or a special BBQ pit slab, trash can slab, etc. Keep in mind that when the truck comes it weighs A LOT. Make sure that the area where the truck will be driving will support the weight. I had a friend who was pouring a patio in his back yard. He had the truck back around beside the house. Well, the ground was a bit damp and the truck sunk right on down and ended up destroying the water line when they were pulling it out.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:49:41 PM EDT
Like JMO said, you don't need rebar for a pad.Order the fiber.for the carport you want to make that 5 inches and pour a small footing about a foot to 18" wide and 8 to 10" deep were the car/truck enters leaves.I've poures close to 75 like that and never had a crack.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:51:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/22/2002 12:53:00 PM EDT by Gun-fan]
Originally Posted By Wobblin-Goblin:
Originally Posted By Gun-fan: How many cubic yards are in a truck load?
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Depends on the type of trucks they use in SC and how restrictive the weight laws are. Generally 10-10.5 yds. is the max these days. BTW, do not simply ask for a patio mix. That's like calling up an Italian restaurant and asking for pizza. Use specifics. 3500lb. test with pea-stone. If you want added protection against separation ([i]all[/i] concrete cracks eventually), you can use wire mesh (get the 5x10' sheets, not the rolls of wire) or better yet, ask for fibermesh in the mix of concrete. It usually goes for $7-$10/yard.
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Just talked to a vendor. 3000lb mix is $62/yd delivered. The 3500lb is $65/yd. He said it was a front dump & would hold 10 yards normaly. Said we could do it in 2 pours. 7 or so yards first & then what we needed to finish on the last. I like the idea of adding some walkways or something while I'm at it.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:58:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Gun-fan:
Originally Posted By Wobblin-Goblin:
Originally Posted By Gun-fan: How many cubic yards are in a truck load?
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Depends on the type of trucks they use in SC and how restrictive the weight laws are. Generally 10-10.5 yds. is the max these days. BTW, do not simply ask for a patio mix. That's like calling up an Italian restaurant and asking for pizza. Use specifics. 3500lb. test with pea-stone. If you want added protection against separation ([i]all[/i] concrete cracks eventually), you can use wire mesh (get the 5x10' sheets, not the rolls of wire) or better yet, ask for fibermesh in the mix of concrete. It usually goes for $7-$10/yard.
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Just talked to a vendor. 3000lb mix is $62/yd delivered. The 3500lb is $65/yd. He said it was a front dump & would hold 10 yards normaly. Said we could do it in 2 pours. 7 or so yards first & then what we needed to finish on the last. I like the idea of adding some walkways or something while I'm at it.
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Crete's pretty cheap in SC. Front-end discharge trucks make the job much easier on the guys who are pouring the concrete. My advice? If you can afford it, hire a concrete finisher to do the job for you. Again, use specifics when you describe what you want done. Otherwise, you get only what he [i]thinks[/i] you need.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 1:10:37 PM EDT
While we are talking crete, would you need to do anything more than what has been suggested so far if you wanted to put a lift in the garage ? The kind of lift that has 2 towers (one on each side of the car) that lifts a car overhead.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 1:15:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Philadelphia_GunMan: While we are talking crete, would you need to do anything more than what has been suggested so far if you wanted to put a lift in the garage ? The kind of lift that has 2 towers (one on each side of the car) that lifts a car overhead.
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You would need a footing and some rebar spread out int the floor to hold the weight.The weight of the vehicle wouldn't be spread out as much.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 1:21:13 PM EDT
I suggest sealing or covering the concrete so it doesn't dry too fast. I second the use of poly it greatly increase the tensile strength of the concrete. I would also suggest a 4 x 4 " wire mesh.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 1:24:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By JIMBEAM: I suggest sealing or covering the concrete so it doesn't dry too fast. I second the use of poly it greatly increase the tensile strength of the concrete. I would also suggest a 4 x 4 " wire mesh.
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Would you be a concrete contractor by chance? I see you are in SC also. I'm in the midlands (Columbia).
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 1:32:46 PM EDT
Gun-fan - A word of caution. (I'm from SC by the way) Don't go with the heavier lb test - use the 3,000. Its all you'll EVER need for a patio / carport. On a recent job, I used the 3,500 lb and it dries BEFORE its poured. I ate a $350 load cuz it dried too fast (the heavier lb test is achieved by using a greater concentration of mortar. If you think you need more strength, go with a thicker pad - 5" or 6". And use re-bar reinforcment. If you are in the Upstate, check out Zupan and Smith. Nice people, on time delivery, good prices.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 1:44:10 PM EDT
You might consider having the finisher cut expansion joints. In household pours I like every 10 feet. That way when it cracks, not if, when, you control where it cracks. Most finishers will do this anyway. BTW I'm also a fan of pu*&y hair, I mean fiber. My 125 foot drive and my pad are all with fiber. Form your walks and cut a board to block if off when you run out of mud. That way no waste. Good luck.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 2:39:49 PM EDT
Base preparation is important, too. Remove all organic materials (topsoil, roots, grass) and clay soils from where you're about to place the concrete, leaving a sand and gravel base (which allows water to drain). Wet down the base and use a vibratory plate compactor or roller to compact the base. I agree a 3000 psi mix is sufficient; as mentioned, the workability is necessary for this type of application. I do feel that a 6" thickness (with welded wire mesh) is better suited for a vehicle parking area, 4" (unreinforced) for sidewalks. You should order only as much concrete as you can place within 90 minutes of mixing (at the plant). Concrete hardens by a chemical process called hydration, a reaction started by the addition of water, rather than "drying" - that's why you cannot just add more water to concrete as it hardens without reducing its strength. When the concrete has cured after finishing (3-4 hours), and the surface starts to dry off, keep the surface moist for the next 4 to 5 days. Some apply liquid sealers, others use plastic or wet burlap, but the easiest way is to use a sprinkler or hose. The driveway will be ok to park on in 5 days.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 2:49:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Gun-fan:
Originally Posted By JIMBEAM: I suggest sealing or covering the concrete so it doesn't dry too fast. I second the use of poly it greatly increase the tensile strength of the concrete. I would also suggest a 4 x 4 " wire mesh.
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Would you be a concrete contractor by chance? I see you are in SC also. I'm in the midlands (Columbia).
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Sorry not a contractor. I am an engineer with a little concert experience. Not much just small pads.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 5:00:24 PM EDT
at least you called it concrete instead of cement!
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 5:05:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By j3:
Simple math! 4 inches is one third an inch thick,
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I knew I should have stayed in school, quit before I got to this part.
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LOL
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 6:31:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ARMALITE-FAN:
Originally Posted By Philadelphia_GunMan: While we are talking crete, would you need to do anything more than what has been suggested so far if you wanted to put a lift in the garage ? The kind of lift that has 2 towers (one on each side of the car) that lifts a car overhead.
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You would need a footing and some rebar spread out int the floor to hold the weight.The weight of the vehicle wouldn't be spread out as much.
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The feet on these lifts cover over one square foot of floorspace. Does that matter ?
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 7:02:14 PM EDT
You need something to anchor it to.Im shure the lift manufactur has specs to follow.I was thinking if you got a car a little too far forward or back.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 7:16:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/23/2002 7:18:32 AM EDT by cretescreeder]
An easy way to figure your yardage-- Take your sq.ft and divide by 80 for 4" thick 65 for 5" 54 for 6" does not include thickened edge. I would use 3000 psi mud, 5" thick with 6x6x10x10 wire mesh for a parking area, stay away from the fibermesh!! Putting plastic (visqueen) down well give you a little more time to finish the concrete but is no real advantage for outside concrete Just make sure you pull the wire up into the concrete when you pour it. Also ask the concrete company how much air you need in the concrete for your area but don't let them give you more than 4%. For a 20x20 slab you won't need any control joints. I would also recommend putting a light broom finish on it so you don't slip and bust your butt when it gets wet. If you have never poured concrete before, you may want to hire someone or get a friend who has to help. One more note, If you decide to hire someone, ask the concrete company for a good concrete contractor. That way you won't get burned (as bad).
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 7:17:03 AM EDT
An easy way to figure your yardage-- Take your sq.ft and divide by 80 for 4" thick 65 for 5" 54 for 6" does not include thickened edge. I would use 3000 psi mud with 6x6x10x10 wire mesh for a parking area, stay away from the fibermesh!! Putting plastic (visqueen) down well give you a little more time to finish the concrete but is no real advantage for outside concrete Just make sure you pull the wire up into the concrete when you pour it. Also ask the concrete company how much air you need in the concrete for your area but don't let them give you more than 4%. For a 20x20 slab you won't need any control joints. I would also recommend putting a light broom finish on it so you don't slip and bust your butt when it gets wet. If you have never poured concrete before, you may want to hire someone or get a friend who has to help. One more note, If you decide to hire someone, ask the concrete company for a good concrete contractor. That way you won't get burned (as bad).
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 8:14:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Gun-fan:
Originally Posted By ArmedAggie: you might want to consider reinforcing the carport slab, at the least, as well. #3 rebars at 18" apart, each way, should do nicely.
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I was gonna use take off Remington 700 barrels. Just kidding. I do know a custom rifle maker that did just that. They had no value to him.
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NOOOOOOOO!!!!!!! If you have any 30.06, .308, 7Mag, or especially 25.06 barrels to spare, I'll trade you their weight in rebar or wire... "Higher!!! Higher!!! PULL THAT WIRE!!!!" good luck. I just poured a 5x8 pad/ramp above my basement steps 2 weeks ago. It will make the safe installation much easier. I refused to pay the $100 delivery charge for less than 3 yards, and bought 20 (80#) bags of Sakrete. Anybody care to guess how many bags I had to get the ol lady to haul ass and buy cause I came up short?? I'll send the winner 1 round of spent Wolf .223 as a prize. Post paid, of course... cause I'm a nice guy.
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