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Posted: 7/22/2002 11:56:11 AM EDT
Here's a letter from my Congress Weenie on arming pilots. He's actuallyl hiding behind Bush on this one. Worse than that, Bush is knowingly providing cover for him.
Dear Mr. garandman: Thank you for contacting me regarding arming airline pilots. I appreciate hearing your views on this matter. In response to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, I worked hard to ensure prompt passage of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act which became Public Law 107-71 when it was signed by President Bush on November 19, 2001. This legislation contains a provision that authorizes the pilot of a commercial passenger aircraft to carry a firearm in the cockpit with the approval of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the pilot's airline. The Senate voted unanimously to have security experts in the Bush Administration make the determination on arming pilots because we agreed that this decision should be based on the cautious consideration and study of which actions need to be taken to provide the highest level of security for the nation's traveling public. As you know, security is a multi-layered effort and we have created a security process that begins before an individual arrives at an airport. Public Law 107-71 also mandates more armed Federal Air Marshals (FAMs) on planes, particularly those long-distance and potentially vulnerable flights. The Administration had made hiring FAMs a top priority and have met their targeted hiring goals. As the law requires, growing numbers of FAMs will be deployed on air carriers, a concept endorsed by the President. Under Secretary Magaw, President Bush's hand-picked head of the TSA has been working with his staff on the issue of guns in cockpits. On May 21, 2002, while testifying before the Senate Commerce Committee, which I chair, Mr. Magaw informed us that he has decided that, from a security standpoint, he will not authorize the arming of commercial airline pilots. The President has said no. I agree and I will support the President's decision here. In an effort to further ensure the security of aircraft cockpits, I sponsored S. 2497, legislation that prohibits the opening of cockpit doors while in flight. This bill is intended to strengthen rules regarding entrance and egress from the flight deck, and to provide alternatives to consider regarding the structuring of cockpit doors.
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Link Posted: 7/22/2002 11:56:43 AM EDT
Please know that I will continue to work in the Senate to Mr. garandman Page 2 conduct oversight of the TSA's progress on implementing aviation security in an effort to ensure the safest national transportation system possible. Again, thank you for contacting me on this important matter. Please do not hesitate to contact me in the future if I can be of any assistance on this or other matters. With kindest regards, I am Sincerely, Ernest F. Hollings United States Senator
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Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:00:06 PM EDT
How funny. Hollings is 70-something years old and has been in the senate for almost 30 years and he is [b]the junior senator from SC![/b]
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 12:07:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 1:32:08 PM EDT
Hollings wrote: In an effort to further ensure the security of aircraft cockpits, I sponsored S. 2497, legislation that prohibits the opening of cockpit doors while in flight. This bill is intended to strengthen rules regarding entrance and egress from the flight deck, and to provide alternatives to consider regarding the structuring of cockpit doors.
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So, peeing in a cup for drug testing isn't enough -- he wants them to pee in cups on every flight?? Sounds like you people in SC need to replace BOTH of your Senators.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 2:06:26 PM EDT
Sounds like you people in SC need to replace BOTH of your Senators.
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OK youngster, what do you have against Strom?z
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 2:29:50 PM EDT
Again, the answer is a simple application of supply and demand. If the airlines will not arm pilots in an effort to save you and your loved ones - DON'T FLY. On my last trip I drove to my destination - 12 hour drive over a four hour + flight (when you consider getting there early for check-in, wait time, flight time, baggage claim, pick up rental car or taxi at destination). I am guessing that about one week of not flying by the general public and you will see airlines issuing full auto to pilots and crew in an effort to get customers back. Unfortunately, they are making money hand-over-fist and could care less if the military shoots down a plane with YOUR loved ones on it.
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