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Posted: 7/15/2002 3:33:15 PM EDT
Any advice on how much to use or tips for proper application? This will be for a socket 370 chip & new heatsink.
Link Posted: 7/15/2002 3:37:00 PM EDT
Shouldn't you ask the question in the "Do it yourself" section? [:p] seriously, It should cover all the contacted are between the CPU and the heatsink.
Link Posted: 7/15/2002 3:37:48 PM EDT
Just a [u]very thin[/u] coating, enough to cover the metal part of the chip where it meets the sink. Some heatsinks already have a "pad" of compound on them from the factory.
Link Posted: 7/15/2002 3:38:49 PM EDT
Use as little as possible. Application with a razor blade works well, as it leaves a very thin even coat.
Link Posted: 7/15/2002 3:40:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/15/2002 3:43:35 PM EDT by Boomholzer]
Careful, once to touch that stuff, it ends up everywhere! It never cures either. Generally you want to use as little as possible while covering the entire surface. Depending on the device For large pwr devices like TO3 cans I will apply an slightly excess amount. The rigid pkg and two mounts wil force out the excess. For your application, I would appy just enought to cover the full metal surface and squeegee off the excess with a small piece of paper before attaching the heatsink. For good thermal transfer, torque the hardware sufficiently. edited to add that Dextor beat me to it. [;)]
Link Posted: 7/15/2002 4:32:49 PM EDT
Kevin go here [url]http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm[/url] don't know what kind your using but these instructions will apply to most heatsink compounds. Do not use the included pad if you have an alternative, they work but thats about all you can say about them. Chips can run 10 to 20 degrees hotter with a thermal pad.
Link Posted: 7/15/2002 4:41:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DoomPatrol: Kevin go here [url]http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm[/url] don't know what kind your using but these instructions will apply to most heatsink compounds. Do not use the included pad if you have an alternative, they work but thats about all you can say about them. Chips can run 10 to 20 degrees hotter with a thermal pad.
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If you are talking about a sil pad, they are a poorer, cheaper (mfg wise) alternative to the compound.
Link Posted: 7/15/2002 4:46:31 PM EDT
Step 1: They obvioulsy give you a whole bunch for a reason - use it[b]*[/b]! Step 2: Use a blowtorch to cure it so it won't run onto your motherboard.[b]**[/b] step 3: Liberally apply metal shavings to the chip once installed AND prior to HSF installation in order to increase heat transfer.[b]***[/b] Just follow these 3 easy steps, and everything will be o-tay![b]****[/b] [grenade] the_reject [b]*[/b] - Don't do this. [b]**[/b] - Don't do this. [b]***[/b] - Don't do this. [b]****[/b] - Only if a fried motherboard and processor is your idea of "o-tay".
Link Posted: 7/15/2002 4:53:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By the_reject: Step 1: They obvioulsy give you a whole bunch for a reason - use it[b]*[/b]! Step 2: Use a blowtorch to cure it so it won't run onto your motherboard.[b]**[/b] step 3: Liberally apply metal shavings to the chip once installed AND prior to HSF installation in order to increase heat transfer.[b]***[/b] Just follow these 3 easy steps, and everything will be o-tay![b]****[/b]
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You owe me $200, I now have a very high priced Christmas tree ornament!!! [:D]
Link Posted: 7/15/2002 5:03:17 PM EDT
BTW - thanks guys.
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