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Posted: 5/27/2002 10:34:59 AM EDT
I like to keep my work life and home life as separate as possible. I've been slowly trying to develope this "turn it off like a switch" ability. I allow a little crossover because I tend to think about work the night before I go back as well as thinking about home while I'm working. For the most part, I don't talk about home much at the job. My workplace encourages family orientation and participation at company gatherings, but takes it to an almost "cult" level that I abhore. They also talk about how the family comes first, but rarely deliver on this one because work demand is incredible. I also don't talk about work at home. This bothers my wife who claims she wants to hear about it, but has no understanding of what I do. If I do tell her what I've been up to, all I get is the deer-in-the-headlights look, which is understandable, because she has no interest/knowledge in the field. Damned if I do...... Anyway....When I'm not on the clock I don't consider myself tied to them. It seems to me that if you keep thinking about work after hours, your devaluing yourself for solving problems while your not being compenstated (can you tell I'm a little burnt-out). I can actually count the number of 40 hour weeks I've had in the last two years without taking my shoes off (not including vaction, which I've only been able to take 1 week out of the three I'm given). I can see how my thinking is flawed when it comes to public office positions and the like. But how about the rest of the working Joes? During your off hours, are you just yourself, or JoeWorking of company XYZ?
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 10:48:24 AM EDT
Slightly off topic but funny you should mention this as all my friends introduce me as "Ray the cop". I don't go around introducing my friends as "Chris the waiter" or "John the unemployed" Oh yeah, I'm just a regular guy when I'm NOT working.
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 11:00:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/27/2002 11:01:31 AM EDT by Winston_Wolf]
... Situations vary I'm sure. For me being single my boundaries are usually not readily discernable. Sometimes I work from home, sometimes do class projects at work and some class projects involve aspects of my work. I don't really feel discreet bounds from either of them except I can't carry at work or school. [b]Waverunner[/b], I feel your pain. I've a friend that's a local LEO and on a number of occasions I've heard him introduced that way. It's almost like "This is Mr. Cop so don't do or say anything illegal henceforth". It must suck especially around the womenz.
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 11:02:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/27/2002 11:05:32 AM EDT by Shadowblade]
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 11:13:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By HMC: Military folks can relate as well. We often get introduced by our rank. And you can bet your ass that you ALWAYS introduce your superiors with their rank.
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I never really though about it but I ALWAYS introduce my superiors by their rank as well. Job related or not. "This is Sgt./Mrs./Sensei/Prime Minister..." [:)]
Waverunner: How do cops address each other?
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If you don't know their name, it's usually "Officer" or if you're really into snazzy NYPD lingo "Hey Moe!". If you do know the officer it depends on the situation. Mostly it's on a first name basis but in the presence of non-LEO's it's "Officer such-and-such" to maintain the level of professionalism and to maintain the image of authority.
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 11:27:11 AM EDT
I don't have a problem leaving my job at work. Like most cops, it's everyone else who won't let me.
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 11:28:35 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 11:56:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/27/2002 12:01:25 PM EDT by M4]
When I'm off the clock, I am OFF THE CLOCK. I don't take work home with me, and I make a very diliberate effort not to. I'm all for Capitolism and hard work, but I don't believe in reincarnation, and I've never heard of anyone on their death-bed saying they should have spent more time at the office. Employment is a means to an end, not the end itself. For me to bring work home with me, there would be no end, other than my work. That will never happen. There's about 8 billion worthwhile persuits/hobbies/places/people and things that are well worth checking out and being a part of. If you don't design your life to be a participant in those various things, it's quite easy for the rat-race to consume your entire existance. You only get one shot at a life, and to let your employer define what that is, in my opinion, is a grave mistake. It's a simple matter of time. We all only have so much (or so little), and how we choose to spend that time, even mentally, is a thought process that is of the utmost importance to me. The song "Time" by Pink Floyd says it pretty well.
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 12:01:59 PM EDT
When I'm not there.
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 12:38:43 PM EDT
I knew I couldn't be alone on this one. I work with too many ladder-climbers who spend more time at work than they do at home. I'm not sure if it's affecting them negatively, but I'm sure it's just a matter of time. M4....Anyone would be lucky to have you as a boss.
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 12:47:20 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 12:57:08 PM EDT
I had a 'corporate career', and due to the 24 hours a day nature of it, I opted for a less stressful lifestyle. I was an "Environmental Compliance and Permits Director" for a large family owned Limestone, Sand & Gravel mining company in SW Ohio. I had pagers and cell phones, all of which loved ringing at crazy times. I only dealt with liberal do-gooders, who disregarded the law as they constantly got in touch with their feelings about life. My blood pressure was never acceptable, mi vida loca...Then came the sale... I went back to work after 12 days vacation in Seattle (On the phone 3 hours a day work related), to find out the impending sale was going thru. I flew back to Seattle, got an apartment and 2 jobs, flew back to Ohio and quit. They kept me on salaried retainer for 90 days, where I continued to do conference calls daily. There is a point where a job can be developed into a lifestyle. A job can become too much. Now I punch a clock. Clock in, clock out... go home. [b]Free and clear[/b]. My Family is not very happy with my decision, but my blood pressure damn sure is...
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 1:20:13 PM EDT
Just out of curiosity, how many of you who say 'when I'm off the clock, I'm off the clock' agree with companies doing drug testing? To me, drug testing means that you are under their control 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 2:50:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ControlFreak: M4....Anyone would be lucky to have you as a boss.
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Thanks for the complement. If all goes well, I will be that boss to some in my own business. Come to work, earn your pay, go home and relax. Vacation time? You got it, just make sure your spot on the job is covered while you're away.....and make the most of your time off....have some fun damn it!!!
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 3:51:35 PM EDT
Depends on weither or not your "job" is a profession, or not.. I'd like to leave my work at work, but frequently if I'm at the shop to work on my own stuff, I end up working on someone elses.(when they see that I'm there..) Also, I still stop for breakdowns on the highways.. Amazing how many people don't carry water with em when travelling in Arizona..It's a LONG stretch between towns frequently.. The last thing that keeps me from separating "work" from "home" is that most of the people I know, know I'm a mechanic.. It's tough to tell em "no", as many can't afford to go to a shop for service..(Yes. Stupid of me..) A Job, is that.. You can leave it, and have a home life.. A Profession is diffrent..It's your life, weither you like it or not. Meplat-
Link Posted: 5/27/2002 4:34:18 PM EDT
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