Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 9/14/2010 1:58:54 PM EDT
No, I want this in GD. (Serious replies are great... but I want funny ones as well.)

Once the GF and I buy our house, we want a generator.

Seeing as (within reason) money isn't a big deal, how much for a unit that will power a whole house-and a transfer switch so that my lazy ass doesn't have to do anything if the lights go out?

Gas, diesel, what?

Generator guys, speak up.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:00:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:00:56 PM EDT by SultanOfBrunei]
The whole house? Meh, that is too much.

Personally, I'd pick up one of those cute and QUIET honda jobbers. That way you can take it tailgating or the beach in the 99.999% of the time that your power is on. Should be enough juice to keep your deep-freeze and fridge going.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:02:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:03:02 PM EDT
Nope. I'm looking at those big, set-in-place jobs the size of a steamer trunk.

I'm guesstimating that it can be done for less than 10K.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:04:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Forest:
$$$$$$$ and more $$$$$$$


What's "$"?

1K? 5K? 10K?

I've just started looking into this so, forgive me, I'm new.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:04:45 PM EDT
Since you said you would like some non-serious replies:

Have you thought about Solar or Wind power?
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:04:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Forest:
$$$$$$$ and more $$$$$$$

Diesel is # 1 choice (for output, durability, and longevity of fuel storage) you don't need to rely on a utility to keep you supplied. Only downside is higher cost to purchase and more noise.

For the urbanite in areas not prone to earthquakes or flooding the natural gas powered home generator offers a slightly less expensive quieter option with what ammounts to an unlimited fuel supply (limited only by the amount of $$ in your bank account).
You don't want to power your entire home. You want fridge and deep freeze and a light. Cook on your bbq grill (have extra propane tanks, you can buy em at costco, I have 3 extras).

Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:05:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:06:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:

Originally Posted By Forest:
$$$$$$$ and more $$$$$$$

Diesel is # 1 choice (for output, durability, and longevity of fuel storage) you don't need to rely on a utility to keep you supplied. Only downside is higher cost to purchase and more noise.

For the urbanite in areas not prone to earthquakes or flooding the natural gas powered home generator offers a slightly less expensive quieter option with what ammounts to an unlimited fuel supply (limited only by the amount of $$ in your bank account).
You don't want to power your entire home. You want fridge and deep freeze and a light. Cook on your bbq grill (have extra propane tanks, you can buy em at costco, I have 3 extras).


Okay... 1/2 a house...

What am I looking at in terms of cost?

Give me a WAG, I won't know the difference.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:07:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:10:51 PM EDT by sslocal]
Just put a new one in at work. From the pole to the server room it is all new. Yours for about 1.2 mil.

Seriously, it would run you close to 20K or more for a nice setup provided you pinch a few pennies here and there.

Think about it. You will need not only the generator but the UPS as well as the transfer switches and wiring.
Plus the dude that installs it will not come cheap.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:08:29 PM EDT
3-5000.00 depending on make and model/propane/natural gas/diesel/

Remember if people hear it they will try and take it.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:08:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:19:08 PM EDT by -Apocalypto-]
To power the entire house....AC, fridge, lights, TV, oven......I would guess you would need a 20KW generator. Big money.

Found this...
Briggs & Stratton 40305 Auto Standby Generator Air Cooled 20KW


$4199
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200375064_200375064

Fully automatic standby generator features Whole House Comfort, supplying enough power to manage two 5-ton air conditioners in addition to essential household power needs. The Vanguard big block engine boasts the smallest fuel consumption/foot print in its class. U.S.A

Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:10:23 PM EDT
10-12 K KV output, natural gas hook up if possible, budget for wiring and running fuel line to it and a meter upgrade. You can get it all done for around 5 to 8 K if you shop around for both a good price and a good unit. Make sure whoever installs it has experience, way to many tard installers don't factor in gas flow and pressure and try to foist off the resulting problems on the homeowner.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:10:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By -Apocalypto-:
To power the entire house....AC, fridge, lights, TV, oven......I would guess you would need a 20KW generator. Big money.

Quick Google search says that I'm looking at 4-6K range for that. (I'm sure installation cost will add a grand or so.)

Am I in the ballpark with that?
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:11:47 PM EDT
IIRC, and this was for a project at work and I've slept and seen many invoices since then;

Kohler 25kw NG unit was $15,000

Automatic transfer switch was around $1600

Install was another $3000 with wiring.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:11:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:14:06 PM EDT by callgood]


Generac
36kw

10,500

transfer switch depends on amp. 300-1000

plus installation

you'll need a forklift or a lot of buds.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:12:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fxntime:
10-12 K KV output, natural gas hook up if possible, budget for wiring and running fuel line to it and a meter upgrade. You can get it all done for around 5 to 8 K if you shop around for both a good price and a good unit. Make sure whoever installs it has experience, way to many tard installers don't factor in gas flow and pressure and try to foist off the resulting problems on the homeowner.

Thank you.

This idea is in its infancy. I'm just looking for ballparks.

5-8K is a reasonable ballpark.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:13:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:13:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:15:51 PM EDT by ED_P]
I got an 8KW, automatic, non portable (sits on a pad outside the house) system installed for around $5,600. This included the generator, a propane company guy to pipe in from a 500 gallon tank in my yard, electricians to install everything, and run power lines to my circuit box, and an automatic transfer box to kick on power whenever it goes out.

8KW is enough to run furnace, water, fridge, dishwasher, clothes washer, livingroom and master bedroom. Not whole house.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:14:12 PM EDT
TAG

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:14:17 PM EDT
Perhaps I should have set better parameters...

Let's say "Under 10K".
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:14:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:16:51 PM EDT by TerribleTom]
If you want one that will truly power everything your house without you even noticing that the power is out, you will definitely need a diesel.

Most homes have 240V/200A service, though nobody's using anywhere near that much power.

A 10KW (that's just over 80A @ 120V) probably won't do it. 25KW, maybe? 25KW would be just over 200A @ 120V or 100A @ 240.

Look here: http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&productId=202322375&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&ci_sku=202322375&ci_src=14110944&cm_mmc=shopping-_-googlebase-_-D25X-_-202322375&locStoreNum=4010&marketID=54



25KW for $7999 - not including install, wiring, etc.

ETA - under $10K is probably not unreasonable for an installed unit.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:14:54 PM EDT
you can probably get a 10kW mep-003 for 2 or 3 grand as milsurp.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:15:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ED_P:
I got an 8KW, automatic, non portable (sits on a pad outside the house) system installed for around $5,600. This included the generator, a propane company guy to pipe in from a 500 gallon tank in my yard, electricians to run power to my circuit box, and a transfer box.

8KW is enough to run furnace, water, dishwasher, clothes washer, livingroom and master bedroom. Not whole house.

That sounds doable, and the price is right.

Cool. Thanks.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:16:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:20:54 PM EDT by -Apocalypto-]
Originally Posted By runcible:

Originally Posted By -Apocalypto-:
To power the entire house....AC, fridge, lights, TV, oven......I would guess you would need a 20KW generator. Big money.

Quick Google search says that I'm looking at 4-6K range for that. (I'm sure installation cost will add a grand or so.)

Am I in the ballpark with that?


yes...see my updated post...found one for $4800

make that $4199 and free shipping
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:16:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:19:31 PM EDT by Forest]
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:16:44 PM EDT
Under $10k for something that will allow you to run everything, maybe not everything at the same time depending on how complicated you want the setup to be.

It can run more if you don't have natural gas in your area. In UT NG is plumbed to damn near every home. Most just buy a generator to run off NG when the power goes out. In an earthquake though the NG supply will likely be shut off. Some have opted to have propane tank buried in their yard that supplies the generator.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:17:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:19:50 PM EDT by EvanWilliams]

Originally Posted By Forest:
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:

Originally Posted By Forest:
$$$$$$$ and more $$$$$$$

Diesel is # 1 choice (for output, durability, and longevity of fuel storage) you don't need to rely on a utility to keep you supplied. Only downside is higher cost to purchase and more noise.

For the urbanite in areas not prone to earthquakes or flooding the natural gas powered home generator offers a slightly less expensive quieter option with what ammounts to an unlimited fuel supply (limited only by the amount of $$ in your bank account).
You don't want to power your entire home. You want fridge and deep freeze and a light. Cook on your bbq grill (have extra propane tanks, you can buy em at costco, I have 3 extras).



The OP does. You should try READING the OPs question before posting.
Notice below the new qualifier under 10K and 1/2 a house. I saw it coming before he posted. Maybe you should think before you post. . If he lives in a shack.
Oh and depending on where he lives he will have to have a concrete pad poured. Get an electrical contractor to wire the box and the gas company as well. IT ain't gonna be less than 10K.

Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:18:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:

Originally Posted By Forest:
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:

Originally Posted By Forest:
$$$$$$$ and more $$$$$$$

Diesel is # 1 choice (for output, durability, and longevity of fuel storage) you don't need to rely on a utility to keep you supplied. Only downside is higher cost to purchase and more noise.

For the urbanite in areas not prone to earthquakes or flooding the natural gas powered home generator offers a slightly less expensive quieter option with what ammounts to an unlimited fuel supply (limited only by the amount of $$ in your bank account).
You don't want to power your entire home. You want fridge and deep freeze and a light. Cook on your bbq grill (have extra propane tanks, you can buy em at costco, I have 3 extras).



The OP does. You should try READING the OPs question before posting.
Notice below the new qualifier under 10K. If he lives in a shack.



Well, as I get new info, I try to adjust accordingly. Hey, I said I was new to this!
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:19:03 PM EDT
10-15kw will do you. Depending on, your EWH is it Elec or NG, Furnace NG or Elec, Range NG or Elec? How big is your house? In sq ft? If everything is N.G. you'll be fine with 10KW-15KW $3000-$5000K intsalled in my area.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:19:13 PM EDT
Don't go to small, you'll overwork the gen and it will let you down.
I highly recommend the 3000-XC6DT2-3:

http://www.generatorjoe.net/product.asp?0=503&1=661&3=3561
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:21:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:30:41 PM EDT by MarkNH]
We got a 12Kw Kohler running off our existing 1000 gal propane tank, with automatic transfer switch, installed, for about $6k.

(edit, double checked and corrected price)
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:22:32 PM EDT
I am saving for a Natural Gas powered whole house generator now with an auto transfer switch.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:22:40 PM EDT
We got a Kohler 15Kw, automatic standby switch, 6'x8' concrete pad, tamper proof anchors and a 500 gal DB propane installed all for under 8k. Our house has two breaker panels. The auto standby feeds our kitchen, well, water treatment, and septic on one panel. A manual override can switch on the whole house via the other panel if we want it to.

Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:22:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 2:24:11 PM EDT by EvanWilliams]

Originally Posted By runcible:

Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:

Originally Posted By Forest:
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:

Originally Posted By Forest:
$$$$$$$ and more $$$$$$$

Diesel is # 1 choice (for output, durability, and longevity of fuel storage) you don't need to rely on a utility to keep you supplied. Only downside is higher cost to purchase and more noise.

For the urbanite in areas not prone to earthquakes or flooding the natural gas powered home generator offers a slightly less expensive quieter option with what ammounts to an unlimited fuel supply (limited only by the amount of $$ in your bank account).
You don't want to power your entire home. You want fridge and deep freeze and a light. Cook on your bbq grill (have extra propane tanks, you can buy em at costco, I have 3 extras).



The OP does. You should try READING the OPs question before posting.
Notice below the new qualifier under 10K. If he lives in a shack.



Well, as I get new info, I try to adjust accordingly. Hey, I said I was new to this!

No problem.
These larger things are basically the size of a car engine and require maintenance as well. They start up every day and run for awhile.
My buddy in Colorado has one that runs off his propane tank.

Do you live in the sticks or urban?
And kudos to you for preparing.
BTW: the prices I've seen here are higher.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:24:20 PM EDT
Couple of questions should be first and foremost:

1. What's the total electrical load for your house, assuming everything starts up at once?
2. What's the availability of fuel in your area––do you already have NatGas in your home, can you get propane delivered in bulk, can you get untaxed diesel easily?
3. Where are you –– rural, suburban, urban, etc? In a suburban setting, your neighbors probably don't want a 500-gal diesel or propane tank in the backyard.

I have a manual transfer panel wired for a limited number of circuits. My biggest consideration for emergency electrical power were that there were some things I wanted to run ALL the time (lights, fridge, freezer, well pump), there were some things I wanted to run PART OF THE TIME (water heater, small window AC), and there were some things I wanted to run NOT at all (central AC, range, oven).

The lights, fridge, freezer, and well pump are for convenience, hygiene and morale.
The water heater and window AC are for comfort.

Mostly, I didn't want a mess of extension cords and wires running hither and thither, and I didn't want to have configure/reconfigure everything when the power went out/came back on.

My general rule is that if the power is out less than an hour, I sit in the dark. After that, I wheel out the gen-set, plug it in, throw the disconnect from the mains, and get things back up and running.

In order to pick the appropriate gen-set for your circumstances, you've really got to envision what you want it for (what situations), what your operating parameters are (zero service interruption, minor inconvenience, force majeur, etc), and what the technical requirements are (electrical load, fuel supply, etc).


Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:24:35 PM EDT
Well the first question to ask is how many sq feet is the home. I am a utility power lineman and a 1,000 sq foot home or there about will require about 3,500 to 5,000 watt supply where a 1,500 sq foot home will require around 6,000 to 7,500 watts and lastly a 2,500 + sq foot home will require about 15,000 + watts. You have to have enough excess capacity to handle the surge in load when your load transfer switch kicks in and totes the load that the utility was carrying. Bigger is always better because you WILL always find other stuff to add later down the road. If you have it installed when the house is built, it will be covered under your home owners warranty and repair. If possible go with natural gas because maintenance will be less in the long run. Stored diesel will at sometime go bad and have to be treated or replaced. It all comes down to one thing, how much do you want your life to be the same when things go bad as they are when it's nice out side. Just a thought.

John
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:24:48 PM EDT
You live in NY!


We have a thing called the DEC, and they limit how much liquid fuel you can have on your property.

Propane is not a liquid.


And one giant generator is like puting all your eggs in one basket.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:24:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
I am saving for a Natural Gas powered whole house generator now with an auto transfer switch.

An reason on NG? Looking in the manual at the output rating on ours, it makes the most power using LP vs. the NG...
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:26:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Plattekill:
You live in NY!


My house will NOT be in NY.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:29:05 PM EDT
for my house with everything it would be $1900 for materials for a generac that ran off nat gas.
it was sub 15kw but would pretty much run everything as long as i don't decide to run the a/c, stove, and all the electronics.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:30:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:30:59 PM EDT
Thanks guys. (As much as folks like to bag on GD, I always get good input here.)

My house will most likely be in the 2500 sq ft range, but I guess I really wouldn't need to power all of it.

(However, I do want to be comfortable.)

Natural gas would probably be the fuel source.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:34:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By runcible:
Thanks guys. (As much as folks like to bag on GD, I always get good input here.)

My house will most likely be in the 2500 sq ft range, but I guess I really wouldn't need to power all of it.

(However, I do want to be comfortable.)

Natural gas would probably be the fuel source.


Our 12Kw should be more than enough for you, it runs everything in our 5k+ house except it can't handle both AC units during the summer. We had an ice storm the other winter and it ran everything non-stop for a week. That said, if I had to do it all over again I would go with the 15Kw as it is watercooled not air cooled and much quieter.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:37:22 PM EDT
fridge, freezer, and a light?

If I was gonna spend the bucks $, I'd opt for a little more power.

TV, satellite, computer, internet hardware, shortwave radio

Then maybe a window unit AC. Nothing is worse than trying to sleep when it's hot and humid.

A cold shower in the winter time is pretty demoralizing, not to mention shrinkage.

You can rig up the hot water heater enough for a decent shower, just unplug the freezer and fridge for an hour, plug in the hot water heater, let it get hot, then unplug it.

Shower.

Win.

Inside heat in your house? get something that runs on propane.

And cooking outside on the grill is just awesome. Of course, being able to nuke something in the microwave for a few minutes is awesome too.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:37:24 PM EDT
Just to throw out an option, I sized an APC UPS that can put out 200amp @ 240volt for 24 hours at $38,000.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:38:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Cyclic240B:

Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
I am saving for a Natural Gas powered whole house generator now with an auto transfer switch.

An reason on NG? Looking in the manual at the output rating on ours, it makes the most power using LP vs. the NG...


Maybe a bit less power but you don't have to store it, you don't need a big ugly tank and it's a heck of a lot cheaper and has less price fluctuations then propane does.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:40:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Forest:
Originally Posted By Cyclic240B:

Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
I am saving for a Natural Gas powered whole house generator now with an auto transfer switch.

An reason on NG? Looking in the manual at the output rating on ours, it makes the most power using LP vs. the NG...


No need to store pre-purchased fuel on location. You buy the fuel as you use it.

Also once running you don't need to rely on business they may/may not be open.

It is a circular dilemma. What happens when the company feeding that pipe may/may not be open? I suppose the answers lies within the intended use. If one is only worried about an outage when a storm brews up, and is entirely optimistic, than I suppose NG would work. But, planning for "anything", I went LP with the "bird in the hand vs. the two in the bush" line of reasoning.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:42:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fxntime:
Originally Posted By Cyclic240B:

Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
I am saving for a Natural Gas powered whole house generator now with an auto transfer switch.

An reason on NG? Looking in the manual at the output rating on ours, it makes the most power using LP vs. the NG...


Maybe a bit less power but you don't have to store it, you don't need a big ugly tank and it's a heck of a lot cheaper and has less price fluctuations then propane does.

I said DB above, what we have is a direct burial tank. So there is nothing ugly to look at.

Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:44:18 PM EDT
There were loads of 'em on the gov auction sites, and they weren't dinky. Not otherwise knowing my ass from a hole in the ground with regard to generators though, I passed.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 2:50:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By runcible:

Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:

Originally Posted By Forest:
$$$$$$$ and more $$$$$$$

Diesel is # 1 choice (for output, durability, and longevity of fuel storage) you don't need to rely on a utility to keep you supplied. Only downside is higher cost to purchase and more noise.

For the urbanite in areas not prone to earthquakes or flooding the natural gas powered home generator offers a slightly less expensive quieter option with what ammounts to an unlimited fuel supply (limited only by the amount of $$ in your bank account).
You don't want to power your entire home. You want fridge and deep freeze and a light. Cook on your bbq grill (have extra propane tanks, you can buy em at costco, I have 3 extras).


Okay... 1/2 a house...

What am I looking at in terms of cost?

Give me a WAG, I won't know the difference.


We need an idea of what you want to run. "A house" isn't really specific. Central heat/air? Electric stove/oven? 87 fridges and 5 deep freezes?

If you want a unit capable of running literally everything(all electric house), then you're probably looking at something in the 15Kw to 20Kw range. Look at diesel units.

like this
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top