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Posted: 9/12/2010 11:33:02 PM EDT
I suspect we will be hearing about Iran any time now.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:37:55 PM EDT
Not here it aint...
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:38:43 PM EDT
Going down? Hell the have been going up 10 cents a week for the last three weeks here.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:38:59 PM EDT
just filled up for $2.36/gallon
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:49:15 PM EDT
One of the two hurricanes/tropical storms that are headed this way will raise it a bit. Everytime prices start dropping a bit something comes along.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:55:19 PM EDT
They start their decline every year, at around this time.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:57:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Subnet:
They start their decline every year, at around this time.

This.

It's the week after Labor Day.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:58:15 PM EDT
$2.54 is the cheapest here.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 12:00:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GeorgeInNePa:

Originally Posted By Subnet:
They start their decline every year, at around this time.

This.

It's the week after Labor Day.

And they'll bottom out somewhere in/around January. Same as every other year.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 12:12:33 AM EDT
Nope. Everything is a conspiracy to the OP. Sad.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 12:51:38 AM EDT
2.51 here. Gonna cash in my fuel perks for 40 cents off a gallon. I haven't paid 2.11 a gallon in a LOOOOONG time.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:04:58 AM EDT
I just passed a station that had 2.89 for regular sunday afternoon
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:11:07 AM EDT
2.82 here. Been that way for quite awhile.


Feb 14, 1999. Corpus Christi, Texas.



Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:14:37 AM EDT


They've been fluctuating up and down about a dime a gallon here.


Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:15:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Airwolf:
2.82 here. Been that way for quite awhile.


Feb 14, 1999. Corpus Christi, Texas.

http://lh6.ggpht.com/_7NduKsyhQUo/TIr9tscpQ8I/AAAAAAAAQ8E/xKtx0QkFLvc/2-14-1999-132.JPG

Those were pretty much Ohio prices too, at the time (I was here on vacation, around that time).

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:27:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By GeorgeInNePa:

Originally Posted By Subnet:
They start their decline every year, at around this time.

This.

It's the week after Labor Day.

And they'll bottom out somewhere in/around January. Same as every other year.

Cycles.

But Arfcom only wants to believe in certain cycles and not others.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:27:42 AM EDT
Gas went up .30/gal to 3.09 here because of this:

http://cbs2chicago.com/business/romeoville.oil.spill.2.1905685.html

Romeoville Oil Pipeline Still Leaking
Leak May Cause Supply Problems Nationwide, Lead To Higher Gas Prices Across Midwest
ROMEOVILLE, Ill. (CBS) ―

[Click to zoom.] Click to enlarge
1 of 1
Crews worked to contain an oil spill from an underground petroleum pipeline in southwest suburban Romeoville on Thursday.

CBS

Close

numSlides of totalImages
Related Stories

* Crews Stop Oil Leak In Romeoville
(9/10/2010)

Crews have managed to contain an oil spill in southwest suburban Romeoville, but the underground pipeline was still leaking, contrary to early reports. Meantime, worries mount that it could cause supply problems nationwide.

As CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports, the pipeline that ruptured under the Romeoville Industrial Park Thursday supplies 670,000 barrels of oil per day from Canada to the United States. It controls about 7 percent of the U.S. imports of oil into the country, and 25 percent of the Midwestern oil supply.

U.S. crude approached a three-week high on Thursday of almost $76 a barrel after the leak forced Enbridge to shut down the pipeline. It supplies oil to most of the refineries in the Midwest and a major storage hub in Oklahoma.

The outcome could mean higher gas prices all around the Midwest.

The acrid smell of oil still filled the air around the industrial park early Friday morning.

Officials were notified of the spill shortly after noon Thursday.

Romeoville Fire Chief Kent Adams said about 50 gallons of crude per minute leaked from the 34-inch pipeline before it was contained. He said the leak was stopped about 40 minutes after it was first reported.

Officials with Enbridge Energy said in a news release that the line was "shut down within minutes." But as of early morning, cleanup and crews had been on the scene for 18 hours and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said that, contrary to previous reports, they have determined the oil leak has not stopped, although it has been contained.

Neither the EPA nor Enbridge is providing an estimate on just how much oil has leaked out of that pipeline since it began.

That said, the EPA has determined the spill itself is being contained to the area, and it has ordered Enbridge to stop the leak by noon Monday. An Enbridge official says about 200 workers are working around that clock to meet that deadline and clean up the spill.

The company estimates about 16,000 barrels were left in the 3-mile section of pipe after it was shutdown yesterday. Half of that needs to come out before they can even start digging to find and repair the leak.

The oil was being pumped out at about up to 600 barrels an hour.

The EPA says in addition to the leak there is cause for concern with the oil-contaminated water currently standing in a nearby retention pond because of the rain in the forecast for the weekend.

"The threat would be the movement of the oil from its current location and downstream and getting in the Des Plaines River, or going through the waste-water treatment plant, being discharged at that location," the EPA's Sam Borries said.

The EPA has ordered Enbridge to remove and dispose of the oil-contaminated water in that pond.

"We can't quantify exactly what the remediation is until we finish the cleanup effort and do a comprehensive plan as to what needs to be done to bring the area back to where it was prior to this," Al Monaco of Enbridge said.

Early Friday morning, Romeoville Fire Department public information officer Brandon Street said the cleanup was "going quite well." But he said the cleanup will take "a month or so."

"They got on it pretty quickly, and they've been able to mitigate it; contain it to one area. It has not leeched into the rivers, lakes or streams or anything of that nature, so it's going quite well," Street said.

Only a retention pond behind the spill site had been affected, Street said.

As of early. Friday, it was unclear exactly how much oil has leaked, but it "easily" amounted to thousands of gallons, Street said.

During the cleanup operation, the area around the spill has been placed off limits. A total of 100 to 150 employees will not be able to come to work Friday, Street said.

Bus transportation was also suspended for the Valley View School District, since their facilities are located directly south of the spill site.

"Even though the environment in the area is safe, the fire department as well as Enbridge Energy will be out there this morning before school opens up at all locations with air monitoring to make sure everything is OK," Street said.

Streets in the area will be closed for at least a few days, Street said.

Enbridge is the same company involved in a major oil spill into the Kalamzoo River in Michigan earlier this summer.

On July 26, oil began leaking from an Enbridge pipeline that runs from Canada to Griffith, Ind.

Enbridge estimated that spill at about 820,000 gallons, while the U.S. EPA previously estimated it was more than 1 million gallons.

CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli and Mai Martinez, the Associated Press and the Sun-Times Media Wire contributed to this report.

(© MMX, CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.)
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 3:39:40 AM EDT
I bought a Honda Accord last winter on the premise that I could sell it at profit when gas went up this year.

Fucking gas never went up, now I"m stuck driving the econobox another year.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 3:43:01 AM EDT
$2.93 on Saturday.

It was a nice Summer though. That might be the highest - or near the highest - I paid for gas all year so far. Went on a driving trip in July down to TN thanks to cheap gas.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:00:08 AM EDT
Gas just jumped $.30 here over the weekend. Every gas station in every town in a 30 mile radius is exactly at $2.85. Someone explain that please.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:06:20 AM EDT
Gas prices have been going up here as well .. $2.859 a gallon last night. So much for all the "know-it-alls" claiming that we would see huge drops after Labor Day weekend.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:08:46 AM EDT
Almost 3 bucks here...shot up at least 25 cents in past two weeks.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:09:32 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:13:38 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Subnet:
They start their decline every year, at around this time.



The heavy vaca travel season is over.

Gas prices drop.

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:20:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2010 4:21:32 AM EDT by bad_aim80]
Originally Posted By SimonPhoto:
I bought a Honda Accord last winter on the premise that I could sell it at profit when gas went up this year.

Fucking gas never went up, now I"m stuck driving the econobox another year.


The Honda Accord isnt a bad car but I cant help but laught at your prospect of selling a used car at a profit. Especially when there are so many other cars out there that are just as good and they arent having any supply problems. Now your "profit" goes down even more after driving it for another year.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:21:38 AM EDT
Seems ever since the elections gas has been pretty cheap.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:22:27 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Airwolf:
2.82 here. Been that way for quite awhile.


Feb 14, 1999. Corpus Christi, Texas.

http://lh6.ggpht.com/_7NduKsyhQUo/TIr9tscpQ8I/AAAAAAAAQ8E/xKtx0QkFLvc/2-14-1999-132.JPG



I still remember my dad complaining that gas had gone up to $.79/gallon.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:23:19 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:23:35 AM EDT
Originally Posted By fcat:
Gas went up .30/gal to 3.09 here because of this:

http://cbs2chicago.com/business/romeoville.oil.spill.2.1905685.html

Romeoville Oil Pipeline Still Leaking
Leak May Cause Supply Problems Nationwide, Lead To Higher Gas Prices Across Midwest
ROMEOVILLE, Ill. (CBS) ―

[Click to zoom.] Click to enlarge
1 of 1
Crews worked to contain an oil spill from an underground petroleum pipeline in southwest suburban Romeoville on Thursday.

CBS

Close

numSlides of totalImages
Related Stories

* Crews Stop Oil Leak In Romeoville
(9/10/2010)

Crews have managed to contain an oil spill in southwest suburban Romeoville, but the underground pipeline was still leaking, contrary to early reports. Meantime, worries mount that it could cause supply problems nationwide.

As CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports, the pipeline that ruptured under the Romeoville Industrial Park Thursday supplies 670,000 barrels of oil per day from Canada to the United States. It controls about 7 percent of the U.S. imports of oil into the country, and 25 percent of the Midwestern oil supply.

U.S. crude approached a three-week high on Thursday of almost $76 a barrel after the leak forced Enbridge to shut down the pipeline. It supplies oil to most of the refineries in the Midwest and a major storage hub in Oklahoma.

The outcome could mean higher gas prices all around the Midwest.

The acrid smell of oil still filled the air around the industrial park early Friday morning.

Officials were notified of the spill shortly after noon Thursday.

Romeoville Fire Chief Kent Adams said about 50 gallons of crude per minute leaked from the 34-inch pipeline before it was contained. He said the leak was stopped about 40 minutes after it was first reported.

Officials with Enbridge Energy said in a news release that the line was "shut down within minutes." But as of early morning, cleanup and crews had been on the scene for 18 hours and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said that, contrary to previous reports, they have determined the oil leak has not stopped, although it has been contained.

Neither the EPA nor Enbridge is providing an estimate on just how much oil has leaked out of that pipeline since it began.

That said, the EPA has determined the spill itself is being contained to the area, and it has ordered Enbridge to stop the leak by noon Monday. An Enbridge official says about 200 workers are working around that clock to meet that deadline and clean up the spill.

The company estimates about 16,000 barrels were left in the 3-mile section of pipe after it was shutdown yesterday. Half of that needs to come out before they can even start digging to find and repair the leak.

The oil was being pumped out at about up to 600 barrels an hour.

The EPA says in addition to the leak there is cause for concern with the oil-contaminated water currently standing in a nearby retention pond because of the rain in the forecast for the weekend.

"The threat would be the movement of the oil from its current location and downstream and getting in the Des Plaines River, or going through the waste-water treatment plant, being discharged at that location," the EPA's Sam Borries said.

The EPA has ordered Enbridge to remove and dispose of the oil-contaminated water in that pond.

"We can't quantify exactly what the remediation is until we finish the cleanup effort and do a comprehensive plan as to what needs to be done to bring the area back to where it was prior to this," Al Monaco of Enbridge said.

Early Friday morning, Romeoville Fire Department public information officer Brandon Street said the cleanup was "going quite well." But he said the cleanup will take "a month or so."

"They got on it pretty quickly, and they've been able to mitigate it; contain it to one area. It has not leeched into the rivers, lakes or streams or anything of that nature, so it's going quite well," Street said.

Only a retention pond behind the spill site had been affected, Street said.

As of early. Friday, it was unclear exactly how much oil has leaked, but it "easily" amounted to thousands of gallons, Street said.

During the cleanup operation, the area around the spill has been placed off limits. A total of 100 to 150 employees will not be able to come to work Friday, Street said.

Bus transportation was also suspended for the Valley View School District, since their facilities are located directly south of the spill site.

"Even though the environment in the area is safe, the fire department as well as Enbridge Energy will be out there this morning before school opens up at all locations with air monitoring to make sure everything is OK," Street said.

Streets in the area will be closed for at least a few days, Street said.

Enbridge is the same company involved in a major oil spill into the Kalamzoo River in Michigan earlier this summer.

On July 26, oil began leaking from an Enbridge pipeline that runs from Canada to Griffith, Ind.

Enbridge estimated that spill at about 820,000 gallons, while the U.S. EPA previously estimated it was more than 1 million gallons.

CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli and Mai Martinez, the Associated Press and the Sun-Times Media Wire contributed to this report.

(© MMX, CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.)


$3.00+/gallon. Damn, I'll stop complaining about $2.67/gallon for a while.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:33:33 AM EDT
All the way down to 2.79...from 2.83....the savings are just dizzying...
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:40:14 AM EDT
Headed down here. Around $2.50 a gallon. Good for me as I go on vacation in late Sept. early Oct.

As for the poster with the Accord I love my '97 but that said I only use it when I know I'll only have 3-4 hours behind the wheel and around town. Gets a bit cramped after that.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:41:40 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 1srelluc:
Headed down here. Around $2.50 a gallon. Good for me as I go on vacation in late Sept. early Oct.

As for the poster with the Accord I love my '97 but that said I only use it when I know I'll only have 3-4 hours behind the wheel and around town. Gets a bit cramped after that.
I'm taking my vacation then too...

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:51:10 AM EDT
Went up to $2.95 here in the last two days, was $2.69 for a few weeks.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:53:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Airwolf:
2.82 here. Been that way for quite awhile.


Feb 14, 1999. Corpus Christi, Texas.

http://lh6.ggpht.com/_7NduKsyhQUo/TIr9tscpQ8I/AAAAAAAAQ8E/xKtx0QkFLvc/2-14-1999-132.JPG


If I had taken pictures the prices in PA/NJ were about the same during that time. Cheapest that I can remember other than going back a decade before that (watch the original Die Hard Movie where the cop is getting Twinkies, they show the gas prices outside of the station when he looks up at the Nakotomi building).
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:55:01 AM EDT
Prices are going down and will continue to do so until November 2nd.


Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:39:50 AM EDT
Exxon on Navarro in Victoria is $2.29.


Filled up a 55 gal drum yesterday.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:42:45 AM EDT
sw Michigan, 2.80 per gallon.

When is the price going to drop?
Price went up .20 per gallon in the last week.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:55:22 AM EDT
2.95 in Metro Detroit area, I did find one station with 2.87 regular in Detroit actual.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 9:25:21 AM EDT
Been hovering the past couple of weeks between $2.95 and $3.10 a gallon here.

No doubt it will spike upward again soon.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 9:30:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Seansworth:
Originally Posted By Airwolf:
2.82 here. Been that way for quite awhile.


Feb 14, 1999. Corpus Christi, Texas.

http://lh6.ggpht.com/_7NduKsyhQUo/TIr9tscpQ8I/AAAAAAAAQ8E/xKtx0QkFLvc/2-14-1999-132.JPG



I still remember my dad complaining that gas had gone up to $.79/gallon.


I can remember when gas was 19.9 cents/gallon during a price war in the town I was living in. Yeah...I'm old.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 9:30:19 AM EDT
Was $2.39 here and it went up .17 the Friday before Labor Day.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 9:37:46 AM EDT
Not here. There was a .30 cent increase last Thursday... the bastards jack it up then 'ease' it back down over a couple of months to where it was before they jacked it up and then they jack it up again... same old game. Month after month.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 9:44:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2010 9:57:57 AM EDT by ORIGINAL-Waterdog]
What peak oil? Why an oil glut is ahead

FORTUNE –– In May, less than a month after the blowout of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, a key milestone was achieved with little notice: Total U.S. supplies of petroleum and products refined from it (including the Strategic Petroleum Reserve) surpassed 1.8 billion barrels, reaching the highest level in the last 20 years. Since then the total has continued to edge upward, hitting 1.87 billion barrels in the week ended August 27, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Despite the Iraq War and the resulting production disruptions, despite the moratorium on drilling in the Gulf, despite turmoil in Nigeria and ongoing cross-border transshipment quarrels in Central Asia and the multiple, repeated declarations that "peak oil" has arrived and supplies will inevitably dwindle, the United States has more petroleum on hand today than it has had since at least the beginning of the first Gulf War.

Part of that surplus comes from increased oil and gas production, particularly from ongoing production in the non-OPEC countries (including the U.S., where a "shale gas boom" has created a natural-gas glut). It also comes from flat demand due to the stumbling economic recovery and changing consumer behaviors. Neither of those factors is guaranteed to last. But as the summer driving season passes and students head back to school, awareness has gradually dawned that we may be looking at an oil surplus for years to come.

"In the last 18 months we've seen this big trend emerge," says David Kirsch, research director at PFC Energy in Washington, D.C. "We spent five to 10 years in a supply-constrained market, characterized by the growth of the BRIC countries [Brazil, Russia, India and China] and concerns over the security of supplies."

Now, Kirsch remarks, because of the financial crisis and the time it will take to pare down the debt of the major OECD nations, demand growth over the next decade is likely to be lower than previously forecast.



A new forecasting model

Official estimates of future oil supplies don't yet reflect this emerging consensus. Believing that "world oil prices will rise slowly as world oil demand increases because of projected global economic growth, slower growth in non-OPEC oil supply, and continued production restraint by members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC)," the EIA forecasts that the spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude will start climbing again, averaging $81 per barrel in the fourth quarter of this year and $84 per barrel in 2011.

If government experts are wrong, though, we could see persistent surpluses and an oil price drifting toward $50 a barrel or even lower –– far below the $75-per-barrel that King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia called a "fair price for oil" last year. Economists and policymakers have only begun to contemplate what that means.

New oil supplies are coming primarily from Central Asia and Iraq, where nearly a dozen major contracts have been finalized with foreign producers in 2010. The largest prize is the Rumaila Field, in southeast Iraq near the head of the Persian Gulf, with proven reserves 18 billion barrels. BP and China National Petroleum have signed a contract to jointly develop Rumaila. A report from the U.S. Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, issued in July, said that Iraqi production, currently around 2.4 million barrels per day (bpd), could reach 12 million bpd by 2017. Saudi Arabia currently produces around 8 million barrels a day.

In Central Asia, the grandiose predictions for the Caspian Sea basin heard in the late 1990s - "another Saudi Arabia" - are finally approaching reality. Kazakhstan, home of the two largest oil finds in recent decades –– the super-giant Tengiz and Kashagan fields - is building more pipeline capacity heading east, to the vibrant markets of East Asia, rather than west, through the tangled pipeline politics of the Caucasus.

Even Israel, long one of the biggest oil importers in the Middle East, is getting into the act. Last year the U.S. Geological Survey reported that Israeli waters in the Eastern Mediterranean contain more than 120 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas reserves –– and new discoveries have added another potential 24 trillion or so since that report came out.

Questioning peak oil

At the same time, consumers have finally responded to higher gas prices and, perhaps, concern over the environmental impacts of burning fossil fuels. Miles driven by U.S. motorists have fallen over the last couple of years for the first time since such statistics have been collected, indicating that the American love affair with the automobile could be waning. And gasoline demand in China, the world's largest automotive market, may not skyrocket after all, as the government ramps up its drive to replace internal combustion engines with electric vehicles.

An Israeli economy running on, and exporting, large domestic supplies of natural gas is only the most glaring of the geopolitical game-changers that $50-per-barrel oil would entail. Big growth in Iraq's oil industry would lead that country into discussions, and possible disputes, with Saudi Arabia over OPEC's production quotas. The worldwide gas surplus has already reduced the incentive and ability for Vladimir Putin's Russia to engage in power games with gas importers in Eastern Europe. And, of course, cheaper oil from non-OPEC nations could limit the political focus in the U.S. on foreign oil supplies –– and reduce Congress's urgency to pass a comprehensive clean-energy bill.

More than anything, though, the looming oil surplus calls into question the concept of peak oil, at least in the near future, along with the whole science of forecasting future oil supplies. Adam Brandt, a professor at Stanford's Department of Energy Resources Engineering, released a study last month examining the various models that have been used to predict the future of world oil supplies. "Data do not support assertions that any one model type is most useful for forecasting future oil production," Brandt concludes. "In fact, evidence suggests that existing models have fared poorly in predicting global oil production."

In other words, get ready for $50 oil.




This surplus continues to grow, I see a war in an oil producing country, soon.

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 9:46:19 AM EDT
Originally Posted By weptek911:
2.95 in Metro Detroit area, I did find one station with 2.87 regular in Detroit actual.


The Sunoco at 96 and G River usual best price I have found....detroitgasprices.com if you are out and about.
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