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Posted: 9/10/2010 3:04:33 PM EDT
I've been thinking about getting into sailing for a while. I've been out a couple times with friends and the pace is - therapeutic (OK, it's been fairly calm when I've sailed ).

I decided to learn how, so today I bought a Capri 14.2 to pick up the fundamentals and polish some skills before moving up to something bigger.

With the rising costs of gasoline, the wind is still free.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:05:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:
I've been thinking about getting into sailing for a while. I've been out a couple times with friends and the pace is - therapeutic (OK, it's been fairly calm when I've sailed ).

I decided to learn how, so today I bought a Capri 14.2 to pick up the fundamentals and polish some skills before moving up to something bigger.

With the rising costs of gasoline, the wind is still free.

Put a massive BFL on the sail...
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:06:45 PM EDT
Congratulations.



Also, I'm very sorry.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:07:36 PM EDT
Definition of a Sailboat:

a hole in the water into wich you pour money...


Enjoy!!!

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:08:02 PM EDT
AWESOME BOAT!!!!!!!

I learned to sail on a capri 14 when I was 8 years old in Marina DelRay!
As you can see I have been hooked since!


Don't use my boat name.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:08:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By redpine:
Definition of a Sailboat:

a hole in the water into wich you pour money...


Enjoy!!!


Ignore.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:09:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/10/2010 3:10:03 PM EDT by sailsail]

Originally Posted By Brohawk:
I've been thinking about getting into sailing for a while. I've been out a couple times with friends and the pace is - therapeutic (OK, it's been fairly calm when I've sailed ).

I decided to learn how, so today I bought a Capri 14.2 to pick up the fundamentals and polish some skills before moving up to something bigger.

With the rising costs of gasoline, the wind is still free.

If you have any questions or would like to borrow any sailing book let me know!

IM me I can send you a few easy books that you can keep.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:16:42 PM EDT
WOW I killed this thread.

Sorry man.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:17:10 PM EDT
that's a great little 1design to learn in. you'll have full sail controls, which is important, and also have enough room to relax and enjoy the boat. something like an I-14 is a pure racer, without much leisure space.

now get wet!
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:17:54 PM EDT
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:18:13 PM EDT
Sweet. I will be doing likewise at some point. The wife really wants to learn how to sail so it'll be for her mostly so we can go together.

Hope you enjoy it!
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:19:13 PM EDT

My buddy works at a marina at a huge lake around here. He came onto a 25 foot sail boat for cheap. He learned and I went out for a ride awhile back. We took a 30 pack and took off. IT was lame at first because there was no wind. About midnight the wind picked up. We were fly'in and it was a blast. I have to say , to me its more fun than a power boat. Its quiet and takes more skill. Its not near as hard as you think it is once you get the hang of it.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:20:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/10/2010 3:46:34 PM EDT by sailsail]

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.

IM me, I will send you a learn to sail book.





First you need to learn the basic parts of a boat, the best boat to learn to sail on would be a sunfish or a boat like the OP's Capri. I advise against learning to sail on a Laser or any wet racing boat. Just because it has one sail one sail does not mean it is an easy boat to sail, a Moth would be a very bad boat to learn on, a Sunfish much better. Again, a boat with two sails like the OP would be a great boat to learn on (very stable, roomy and forgiving) but a boat with two sails like a 49er would be a bad idea. THose the two extremes of the scale.

The first thing you need to learn are the points of sail, or at least "Close hauled" "Beam Reach" "Broad Reach" and "Running."


You can only sail about 45 degrees off of the wind*, this point of sail is call close hauled. To get somewhere directly into the wind you have to zigzag by tacking (turning the bow of the boat through the wind). This Zig Zag motion is called beating, when you go directly downwind it is called running. That is why when you race you beat your wife then run.

Going from point A to B is beating, The angle the boat is sailing at is about 45deg off of the wind:



A lot of beginners get confused because they think they go faster when their sail is sheeted in (pulled in) all the way. In fact the sail as an optimal angle of attack which it should always be at when going up wind:




*Some boats can sail closer
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:34:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.

IM me, I will send you a learn to sail book.


http://www.thepingway.com/newsletter/images/sailing-for-web.gif


The first thing you need to learn are the points of sail, or at least "Close hauled" "Beam Reach" "Broad Reach" and "Running."

You can only sail about 45 degrees off of the wind*, this point of sail is call close hauled. To get somewhere directly into the wind you have to zigzag by tacking (turning the bow of the boat through the wind). This Zig Zag motion is called beating, when you go directly downwind it is called running. That is why when you race you beat your wife then run.

Going from point A to B is beating, The angle the boat is sailing at is about 45deg off of the wind:


A lot of beginners get confused because they think they go faster when their sail is sheeted in (pulled in) all the way. In fact the sail as an optimal angle of attack which it should always be at when going up wind:



*Some boats can sail closer

Fascinating.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:37:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By schizrade:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.

IM me, I will send you a learn to sail book.


http://www.thepingway.com/newsletter/images/sailing-for-web.gif


The first thing you need to learn are the points of sail, or at least "Close hauled" "Beam Reach" "Broad Reach" and "Running."

You can only sail about 45 degrees off of the wind*, this point of sail is call close hauled. To get somewhere directly into the wind you have to zigzag by tacking (turning the bow of the boat through the wind). This Zig Zag motion is called beating, when you go directly downwind it is called running. That is why when you race you beat your wife then run.

Going from point A to B is beating, The angle the boat is sailing at is about 45deg off of the wind:


A lot of beginners get confused because they think they go faster when their sail is sheeted in (pulled in) all the way. In fact the sail as an optimal angle of attack which it should always be at when going up wind:



*Some boats can sail closer

Fascinating.

There will be more, I should really do a "Sailsail's Idiots guide to basic sailing thread"
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:40:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By schizrade:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.

IM me, I will send you a learn to sail book.


http://www.thepingway.com/newsletter/images/sailing-for-web.gif


The first thing you need to learn are the points of sail, or at least "Close hauled" "Beam Reach" "Broad Reach" and "Running."

You can only sail about 45 degrees off of the wind*, this point of sail is call close hauled. To get somewhere directly into the wind you have to zigzag by tacking (turning the bow of the boat through the wind). This Zig Zag motion is called beating, when you go directly downwind it is called running. That is why when you race you beat your wife then run.

Going from point A to B is beating, The angle the boat is sailing at is about 45deg off of the wind:


A lot of beginners get confused because they think they go faster when their sail is sheeted in (pulled in) all the way. In fact the sail as an optimal angle of attack which it should always be at when going up wind:



*Some boats can sail closer

Fascinating.

There will be more, I should really do a "Sailsail's Idiots guide to basic sailing thread"




yes please.

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:41:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By schizrade:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.

IM me, I will send you a learn to sail book.


http://www.thepingway.com/newsletter/images/sailing-for-web.gif


The first thing you need to learn are the points of sail, or at least "Close hauled" "Beam Reach" "Broad Reach" and "Running."

You can only sail about 45 degrees off of the wind*, this point of sail is call close hauled. To get somewhere directly into the wind you have to zigzag by tacking (turning the bow of the boat through the wind). This Zig Zag motion is called beating, when you go directly downwind it is called running. That is why when you race you beat your wife then run.

Going from point A to B is beating, The angle the boat is sailing at is about 45deg off of the wind:


A lot of beginners get confused because they think they go faster when their sail is sheeted in (pulled in) all the way. In fact the sail as an optimal angle of attack which it should always be at when going up wind:



*Some boats can sail closer

Fascinating.

There will be more, I should really do a "Sailsail's Idiots guide to basic sailing thread"

That would be a great thread.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:41:26 PM EDT
Enjoy! Best times for a boat, when you buy it and when you sell it

Originally Posted By redpine:
Definition of a Sailboat:

a hole in the water into wich you pour money...


Enjoy!!!



Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:48:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By schizrade:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.

IM me, I will send you a learn to sail book.


http://www.thepingway.com/newsletter/images/sailing-for-web.gif


The first thing you need to learn are the points of sail, or at least "Close hauled" "Beam Reach" "Broad Reach" and "Running."

You can only sail about 45 degrees off of the wind*, this point of sail is call close hauled. To get somewhere directly into the wind you have to zigzag by tacking (turning the bow of the boat through the wind). This Zig Zag motion is called beating, when you go directly downwind it is called running. That is why when you race you beat your wife then run.

Going from point A to B is beating, The angle the boat is sailing at is about 45deg off of the wind:


A lot of beginners get confused because they think they go faster when their sail is sheeted in (pulled in) all the way. In fact the sail as an optimal angle of attack which it should always be at when going up wind:



*Some boats can sail closer

Fascinating.

There will be more, I should really do a "Sailsail's Idiots guide to basic sailing thread"

By all means. Sailing is one of life's great pleasures. Now that you've done upwind do downwind with spinnies and bloopers.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:52:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/10/2010 3:52:29 PM EDT by sailsail]

Originally Posted By XD_Fan:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By schizrade:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:

By all means. Sailing is one of life's great pleasures. Now that you've done upwind do downwind with spinnies and bloopers.
Everyone can sail downwind.
Everyone could sail downwind better if they keep their head low.

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:54:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/10/2010 3:57:30 PM EDT by sirensong]

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.


IM me, I'll send you a book.



You can only sail about 45 degrees off of the wind*, this point of sail is call close hauled. To get somewhere directly into the wind you have to zigzag by tacking (turning the bow of the boat through the wind). This Zig Zag motion is called beating, when you go directly downwind it is called running. That is why when you race you beat your wife then run.

Going from point A to B is beating, The angle the boat is sailing at is about 45deg off of the wind:

A lot of beginners get confused because they think they go faster when their sail is sheeted in (pulled in) all the way. In fact the sail as an optimal angle of attack which it should always be at when going up wind:


*Some boats can sail closer

to expand a little more on this, there are two ways that the wind can act upon a sail: it can push it from behind, or flow over it like an airfoil. as sailsail wrote, sailing to windward is called "beating". on a beat (position B in the diagram), the airfoil is creating lift. note where the vector of that lift would point––instead of dead downwind (180), it points closer to 135 or 225. if the boat had a flat bottom, this is the direction it would take.

in order to move this vector forward, we have to introduce lateral resistance, which takes the form of a fixed keel or moveable centerboard––also foil-shaped––which also creates lift (but in the water instead of the air). picture the way the water would flow––as the boat moves at 135, with the boat's head at 45, which way would the keel's lift vector point? if you think of it as an inclined plane in the water, you'll note that the keel's vector counteracts the sail's lift vector, which results in forward drive.

now, this is extremely simplified. if you check out some of the web resources, you'll discover that a beating boat doesn't go where the bow is pointing––you will make "leeway", which means that you're actually sailing a bit sideways––think of landing an airplane in a crosswind. you'll also discover that, as a sailor, you will be dealing with apparent wind direction instead of true wind direction, which affects how high that you can point.



[edit: looks like he took care of most of those ideas while i was typing this one]
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 4:02:56 PM EDT
Joe and John were identical twins.

Joe owned an old dilapidated boat and kept pretty much to himself. One day he rented out his boat to a group of out-of-staters who sank it. Joe spent all day trying to salvage as much stuff as he could and was out of touch all that day and most of the evening.

Unbeknownst to him, his brother John's wife died suddenly.
When he got back on shore he went into town to pick up a few things at the grocery store. A kind old neighbor woman mistook him for John and said:
"I'm so sorry for your loss. You must feel terrible".

Joe, thinking she was talking about his boat said: "Hell no! Fact is I'm sort of glad to be rid of her. She was a rotten old thing from the beginning. Her bottom was all shriveled up and she smelled like old dead fish. She was always holding water. She had a bad crack in the back and a pretty big hole in the front too. Every time I used her, her hole got bigger and she leaked like crazy.

I guess what finally finished her off was when I rented her to those four guys looking for a good time. I warned them that she wasn't very good and smelled bad. But they wanted her anyway. The darn fools tried to get in her all at one time and she split right up the middle!"

The old woman fainted.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 4:31:07 PM EDT
After putting sailing on the backburner for a long time, I'm getting pretty stoked.

There is a big lake not far away (Moultrie), which should be a good place to practice before going out on the Charleston harbor. I'm looking forward to sailing out the harbor, around Ft Sumter, and back in.

With all the water around here, I started thinking it was a waste to not have a boat.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 4:32:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
Congratulations.



Also, I'm very sorry.


Haven't had it long enough to regret it.







Yet.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 4:40:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By schizrade:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.

IM me, I will send you a learn to sail book.


http://www.thepingway.com/newsletter/images/sailing-for-web.gif


The first thing you need to learn are the points of sail, or at least "Close hauled" "Beam Reach" "Broad Reach" and "Running."

You can only sail about 45 degrees off of the wind*, this point of sail is call close hauled. To get somewhere directly into the wind you have to zigzag by tacking (turning the bow of the boat through the wind). This Zig Zag motion is called beating, when you go directly downwind it is called running. That is why when you race you beat your wife then run.

Going from point A to B is beating, The angle the boat is sailing at is about 45deg off of the wind:


A lot of beginners get confused because they think they go faster when their sail is sheeted in (pulled in) all the way. In fact the sail as an optimal angle of attack which it should always be at when going up wind:



*Some boats can sail closer

Fascinating.

There will be more, I should really do a "Sailsail's Idiots guide to basic sailing thread"
That would be awesome. Long time sailor myself hence the username. Perhaps we should petition for a sailing forum.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 4:45:47 PM EDT

If it:

Flies
Fornicates or,
Floats

It's cheaper to rent!

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 4:49:03 PM EDT
Damn blowboaters Get off my lawn!










Just kidding, you guys are okay in my book.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 4:52:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/10/2010 4:54:06 PM EDT by America-first]
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.



It's simple; you can't sail directly into the wind or you'll come to a dead stop known as "being in irons".

But according to the specific vessel you're sailing; you can sail "close to the wind" (close hauled) around 25-30 degrees from directly into the wind.

The sails are actually foils and create lift just like an airplane's wing which pulls the boat along into the wind.

The keel or centerboard, which are themselves actually foils, create underwater lift which prevents the boat from crabbing entirely sideways so you'll be sailing in a basically forward direction; but you will be crabbing slightly from the direction towards which you are steering; the amount of deviation from your desired course is known as "leeway".

Except when you are sailing down wind; your sails are providing lift and pulling the boat along rather than pushing it.

I sold my sailboat, which I owned since 1983, last year and it was one of the saddest days of my life.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:32:58 PM EDT
Congrats on the boat!!!!!

I grew up sailing the Caribbean with my Dad who has sailed his entire life.

I learned how to really sail on an Etchells. (Steep learning curve)


I have Bareboated a few times since then and just finished all my US Sailing certs except Offshore. (Expensive as hell)
USCG 100 Ton Master comes next which is major pain, but lets you captain commercially. I will be enrolling in the class this coming spring.

I am finally at the point where I want to get my own Blue Water Cruiser (Chartering is expensive), hopefully in time for the 2012 ARC-Atlantic crossing.
Really, there is no better Bug Out Vehicle in the world than a sailboat. You can be pretty much self-efficient and have the freedom to go anywhere you can possibly imagine.
The good news about the economy is that Boats are considered second homes, so there are tons and I mean tons of them floating around Marinas for sale or even in some cases just plain free.

It doesnt matter what boat you have, just keep learning, sailing is one of those things that can accommodate all types of people.
If you are interested in cruising the world or just having the ability to do so if SHTF, then thats even better. Keep learning, take some courses, get some sea miles and before you know it you will be looking for a ocean passage worthy boat in no time. I have met some people that didn't have any experience what so ever but were sailing around the world. Not something I would advise, but the point is that it can be done.

If you have any experience with electronics, tinkering, fixing things, love of weather, radio and visiting distant beaches that no one has stepped foot on for years, live-aboard cruising is the next step.
There are so many different systems aboard a boat that you can honestly fill up your entire day trying to learn more about them. For instance I am taking my Ham exam soon as radio on a sailboat is an absolute blast!

Keep at it and you will fall in lover with the life style.
Besides who wouldnt want this as their backyard everyday

Last year @ British Virgin Islands
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:36:14 PM EDT
Everyone can sail downwind.
Everyone could sail downwind better if they keep their head low.



QFT!
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:37:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.



Tack.

Link Posted: 9/11/2010 2:53:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Rephlex:

If you have any experience with electronics, tinkering, fixing things, love of weather, radio and visiting distant beaches that no one has stepped foot on for years, live-aboard cruising is the next step.


When I first started looking into it I thought live-aboard would be a pretty cool lifestyle. There was an article in the paper a few years ago about a family that lived on a sailboat.

At this point, I have too much stuff I'd have to divest myself of. Especially my books. Hundreds of 'em.

Still, the wife and I would like to do some cruising.


I just realized - I need to get a Mossberg Mariner! We'll have to run "repel boarders" drills.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 4:04:53 AM EDT
Not big into wind boats but my sister is. She has a 34' Beneteau.

The first time we went out in it, (No place to put a fishing rod) she asked "Isn't this great?" I said, "Sis, we've been out almost two hours and we can still see the marina"

Our speed was 1.2mph on the gps. .

It's a floating RV. A NICE floating RV, but I prefer a boat that actually can go places over the horizon sometime today.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 4:12:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By XD_Fan:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By schizrade:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:

By all means. Sailing is one of life's great pleasures. Now that you've done upwind do downwind with spinnies and bloopers.
Everyone can sail downwind.
Everyone could sail downwind better if they keep their head low.



Yep. And don't let some newbie initiate a gybe without telling you.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 4:14:56 AM EDT
Dang, I think this is most sailors I've seen in one thread. Awesome.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 4:24:19 AM EDT
And in case nobody's mentioned it yet......


YOU GONNA GET RAPED.

(By your local marine supply store).

Welcome to the wonderful world of sailing addiction. Be advised that unless you routinely fire registered MK19 HE rounds by the truckload, this hobby will probably become more expensive than shooting.

The plus side is that you can combine the two hobbies.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 4:32:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Plumbata:
Not big into wind boats but my sister is. She has a 34' Beneteau.

The first time we went out in it, (No place to put a fishing rod) she asked "Isn't this great?" I said, "Sis, we've been out almost two hours and we can still see the marina"

Our speed was 1.2mph on the gps. .

It's a floating RV. A NICE floating RV, but I prefer a boat that actually can go places over the horizon sometime today.




I remember pulling into my marina once after a week long Striped Bass Slay-athon and noticing there was a tournament checking in at the same time.

I was toting the last striper to the cleaning station and waiting in line next to the passengers from the charter fishing boat that tied up at the same time. They started ragging on me for having only one fish.

Once I explained that he was just the latest addition to the freezerfull of fillets we'd collected over the past week on less than $20 worth of diesel............

Sailboats move all day at a perfect trolling speed without the engine running to scare the fish.
Sailboats can go all the way around the world between refueling stops.
Sailboats have their best days in weather that keeps the powerboaters at home wishing they could go out.


There is nothing better than waking up at anchor, already on your fishing grounds, making coffee, and then sitting back with Bob Marley bumping along while you fish and wait for the powerboat crowd to finally get everything set and show up.


It ain't about the speed. It's about how much fun you have getting there.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 4:40:37 AM EDT
Originally Posted By HRomberg:
Originally Posted By Plumbata:
Not big into wind boats but my sister is. She has a 34' Beneteau.

The first time we went out in it, (No place to put a fishing rod) she asked "Isn't this great?" I said, "Sis, we've been out almost two hours and we can still see the marina"

Our speed was 1.2mph on the gps. .

It's a floating RV. A NICE floating RV, but I prefer a boat that actually can go places over the horizon sometime today.




I remember pulling into my marina once after a week long Striped Bass Slay-athon and noticing there was a tournament checking in at the same time.

I was toting the last striper to the cleaning station and waiting in line next to the passengers from the charter fishing boat that tied up at the same time. They started ragging on me for having only one fish.

Once I explained that he was just the latest addition to the freezerfull of fillets we'd collected over the past week on less than $20 worth of diesel............

Sailboats move all day at a perfect trolling speed without the engine running to scare the fish.
Sailboats can go all the way around the world between refueling stops.
Sailboats have their best days in weather that keeps the powerboaters at home wishing they could go out.


There is nothing better than waking up at anchor, already on your fishing grounds, making coffee, and then sitting back with Bob Marley bumping along while you fish and wait for the powerboat crowd to finally get everything set and show up.


It ain't about the speed. It's about how much fun you have getting there.


My favorite fishing GPS location is 66 miles form the marina. The SECOND best spot is 36 miles southeast of that.

On an average trip i'll fish three wrecks and a floating oil rig for tuna, round trip is somewhere right at 140 miles. I'd like to be back by Monday of next week.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 4:57:22 AM EDT
Where are the boat pics?
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 7:03:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By goldtop:
Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By XD_Fan:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By schizrade:

Originally Posted By sailsail:

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:

By all means. Sailing is one of life's great pleasures. Now that you've done upwind do downwind with spinnies and bloopers.
Everyone can sail downwind.
Everyone could sail downwind better if they keep their head low.



Yep. And don't let some newbie initiate a gybe without telling you.

Been there done that. I have a bunch of horror stories related to new sailors that thought they were old salts after a couple of lessons. I used to work the fore deck when I raced. (Nothing like going up the stick to clear a fouled halyard in a 20 knot wind!) We were in a pretty heavy tacking duel with another boat and the skippers new girlfriend decided she needed to get up and go pee just as we made a tack.

The boom hit her just about tit level and launched her off the boat. I thought for a minute the skipper was just to leave her. He looked back two or three times before someone reminded him we had to have everyone we started with on board at the finish. We went back and picked her up. She spent the rest of the day in the cabin. She never came back out to race again while I was still on the crew. The skipper said she had the most amazing bruise on her chest as a result. He was laughing as he described her yellow, purple and black tits.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 7:15:51 AM EDT
Congratulations. Don't let anyone rain on your parade. Sailing is like shooting in that you can learn the basics and start doing it in a short time but you can learn and improve for the rest of your life.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 7:17:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By redpine:
Definition of a Sailboat:

a hole in the water into wich you pour money...


Enjoy!!!



+1

I've spent to many hours helping my brother fix his 2 race boats.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 7:17:33 AM EDT


I love the peace of sailing.

Link Posted: 9/11/2010 7:18:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2010 7:23:58 AM EDT by AeroE]
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 7:46:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AeroE:
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Just curious, how does one sail against the wind? I've always wondered how did those guys sailing across the ocean could go either West or East but at the same time, still sometimes have wind blowing AGAINST the direction they want to go.



Cross wind, and not too well in a Capri 14.2. But, flying on a reach in a fresh breeze is so much fun you won't notice you're mostly sailing away from your destination!

Just a side note about sailing a Sunfish or similar boats. If you are a full size captain you will have trouble sailing some of these "wet" boats as they have insufficient stability. I can't sit on the coaming, my ass has to be down in the well to keep the boat upright. That does not work.

Also, don't run into the committee boat. It's considered poor form, and it slows you down.


THat was you!!!


Hopefully I show you guys pics of my new sailboat soon.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 8:00:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By goldtop:
Dang, I think this is most sailors I've seen in one thread. Awesome.



but seriously, i've always wonder about this line from the movie Mater and Commander: "the winds backing sir!"

what does it mean


Link Posted: 9/11/2010 8:30:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2010 8:30:34 AM EDT by Jacketch]
A veering wind is a wind that turns clockwise with height. An example of a veering wind would be a southeast wind at the surface and a west wind at 700 millibars. The wind turns in the same direction as a clock from the surface to 700 millibars. A veering wind is associated with warm air advection and dynamic lifting (primarily because a south wind in the PBL transports warmer air to the north). The magnitude of warm air advection is a function of wind speed and the pre-existing thermal gradient. Weak winds will result in weak advection. Winds often veer ahead of cold fronts (in the warm sector of a mid-latitude cyclone).

A backing wind is a wind that turns counter-clockwise with height. An example of a backing wind would be a north wind at the surface with a west wind at 700 millibars. A backing wind is associated with cold air advection and dynamic sinking. Winds back behind cold fronts. A way to remember the difference between the two is the memorize the set of letters CVW and CCBC, where CVW stands for (Clockwise, Veering, Warm air advection) and CCBC stands for (CounterClockwise, Backing, Cold air advection)

http://www.theweatherprediction.com/habyhints/48/
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 8:55:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2010 9:24:43 AM EDT by jody63]
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 9:10:46 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 10:08:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2010 10:11:26 AM EDT by sirensong]

Originally Posted By flyfishnepa:

Originally Posted By goldtop:
Dang, I think this is most sailors I've seen in one thread. Awesome.



but seriously, i've always wonder about this line from the movie Mater and Commander: "the winds backing sir!"

what does it mean




backing happens when the wind direction shifts "down the compass" (to the left) relative to your head. if you are facing into the wind coming from due south (180), and the wind shifts to the east (90), then it "backed". same thing with a wind that shifts from 010 to 340. i hate to admit it, but i've actually forgotten the term for the wind moving up the compass (to the right).

this is relative to one's position and deals with true wind. apparent wind changes relative to one's line of travel are "lifts" and "headers".

[edit: i guess i'm just late with everything in this thread––jacketh already got it]
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 10:11:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By AeroE:
Don't inquire about this sailboat, you'll get yer 'puter locked up!

http://stlouis.craigslist.org/boa/1947309794.html

Might be just what you're looking for if you want a yellow sailboat with an anker.





no scammers aloud if your a scammer i will lock your computer
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