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Posted: 8/31/2010 5:37:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2010 5:39:41 PM EDT by Merrell]
This will be a simple post.

Let's have your best recipe ffor Filet Mignon, (ideally wrapped with a slice or two of bacon)

Serving somewhere between 10-20 people. There will also be deep-fried turkey and other stuff.

I am thinking of getting one of those uncut filet things at Sams (or local supermarket if on sale)

Something like this:



If this is a trainwreck in the making, let's hear alternatives.

Do I marinate or do anything special with a whole honkin filet?

Also these will be cooked on your basic consumer grill. Should I break out the cast iron and heat it up first to sear the filets?

What about mushrooms, garlic, onions or other stuff???

Here's what I found on the Interweb so far:

Bacon Wrapped, Filet Mignon
Using real thick and smokey bacon really gives this plenty of flavor. It’s cooked slow, because of the bacon, and, as a result, the fillet comes out real moist. There’s so much flavor in the meat, additional sauce isn’t needed.

I was at Sam's Club the other day, and picked up these fillets for the same price as I would pay for rib eye, or sirloin at my local supermarket. Since, I haven't written a recipe for doing fillets yet, I thought I'd give it a try on the grill. If you remember, I've got a small grill, and I really can't start a fire to one side, for indirect baking, so after the fire was going real good, I sprinkled some water on it to cool it down a bit. It worked real well, and the slower cooking let the smokiness of the bacon permeate the meat.

The steaks were cooked to an internal temperature of 110 degrees, which may sound like it's going to be quite rare, but the meat continues to cook while it's resting, and resulted in the medium rare piece that you see in the picture.

I served this with mashed potatoes, my "15 Minute Gravy", and a salad with blue cheese dressing. Everything went together well, as if I was in a Steak House.

In case any one's heard of, and is wondering about a "Cap Off" Rib Steak. It's called a "Rib Filet", and should be cooked using the same method as described below. This is the inside piece of a Rib Eye Steak, but should NOT be confused with an Eye Round which comes out of the Bottom Round.



4 Pieces Fillet Mignon, about 1 1/2" thick
4 Strips Thick-sliced Bacon
Toothpicks or Butcher's Twine
Vegetable Oil, as needed
Butt Kickin' Blacken, Original Recipe, to taste
Kosher Salt, to taste
Coarse Ground Black Pepper, to taste

1. Remove any silverskin, and extra fat from the fillets. Wrap a piece of bacon around the outside, and either secure with a toothpick, or wrap with butcher's twine. Don't overlap the bacon by more than 1/4", you want to make sure that the bacon will cook. However, if your using thin bacon, you might want to use 2 pieces to get the extra thickness and flavor. Securing the bacon with toothpicks works, but by tieing the bacon, you're forming a more rounded piece of meat that will look nicer on the plate. 2. Oil the meat liberally, dust with the blacken. salt, and pepper, and rub it into both sides of the meat. Se the meat on a platter and place back in the refrigerator until you're ready to cook it. Don't be afraid to use a little more slat than you think you should, it's on the grill and won't end up as strong. 3. Cook over a medium hot grill for abou


can we do better???

t 10 minutes per side. Ultimately you want the meat to reach an internal temperature of 110 degrees. If you cook on too hot a fire, the bacon will flame up and you'll end up with burned bacon, and burned meat. The oil on the outside helps the meat to sear (keeping in the juices), and helps keep the meat from sticking to the grill.

4. When testing the internal temperature of a thin pieces of meat, be sure to insert the thermometer in from the side.


pix & advice welcome!!!

Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:00:15 PM EDT
The steak in that picture looks like an overcooked piece of meat; there's no blood oozing out onto the plate.

10 minutes per side is probably right for the bacon to be cooked well, but not the steak... 8.5-9 minutes per side is much better.



I usually get a 2 pre-mixed seasonings (Pappy's) and mix it with another (Susie Q's Santa Maria) and combine them into one container 50/50. Essentially the primary ingredients are: salt, pepper, seasoning salt, garlic powder, parsley.

45-60 minutes before you plan to cook, season the steaks & leave on the counter (covered) to warm through.



Sauteed Mushrooms are good with almost any steak

wash & chop mushrooms
put A LOT of butter in a large skillet, med-high heat
toss in mushrooms & stir occasionally
before you are ready to serve, pour 1/4 cup of booze in - red wine, whiskey, beer...
allow liquid to evaporate
serve

Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:03:05 PM EDT
Good start - now if I pick up the whole filet thingy, do I marinate it or anything?

And how thick to cut it up? 2"?

Do I sear it on the grille and then finish it in the oven or ????
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:07:42 PM EDT
10 minutes per side for 1 1/2" cut is a little on the burnt side.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:09:58 PM EDT
You do NOT marinate filet. Or any good cut of meat for that matter.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:12:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Seydou:
You do NOT marinate filet. Or any good cut of meat for that matter.


IANAC


(I am not a chef)

Just want to do up some nice chow for some friends

Let's hear recommendations for sides and anything else - I am thinkin steaming some veggies and baked spuds
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:17:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2010 6:20:25 PM EDT by jeremy223]
First - don't buy from Sam's. Find a good local butcher and take their advice. You want something that looks like this:

Read up here, as well:
http://lifehacker.com/5566284/whip-up-a-restaurant+quality-porterhouse-steak-on-the-cheap
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:22:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2010 6:22:51 PM EDT by robertl]
You must have an absolutely smoking hot grill.

Slice the dead cow tenderloin into 1 1/2" thick filets, wrap with bacon.

Lightly rub the dead cow with olive oil.

Grind pepper on the dead cow.

Sprinkle the dead cow with Kosher Salt.

Put the dead cow on the grill.

Don't f@ck with the dead cow for five minutes.

Turn the dead cow over.

Don't f@ck with the dead cow for four minutes.

Remove the dead cow from the grill

Cover the dead cow with foil and let it rest for 10 minutes.

Eat the dead cow.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:24:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2010 6:27:04 PM EDT by mattsd]
OK, a few things to consider.

1. Cast iron is not a bad idea. You want to sear the steak with mega heat, and our course you want some nice thick bacon on there. But here is the rub, bacon has a tendency to flare on a hot grill. The tasty fat drips out of the bacon, falls though the grates, and flairs up. If you use a pan all of that fat sticks around in the pan, along with alot of seared on beef goodness. A splash of whiskey (watch out for the fire) will liquefy all of the pan-fond goodness, and a little cream will provide a nice body to combine that liquid flavor and that bacon fat. It is a fine sauce. If you really want to get crazy, deglaze the pan (the whiskey step) then VERY SLOWLY under VERY LOW HEAT (if you are using cast iron, the heat in the pan will be enough) melt butter into the sauce one tblsp at a time, mixing gently with a rubber spatula, until its get thick and frothy. Note, this butter sauce is a temporary emulsification and will break if it gets too hot, or if you cool it off in the fridge. Must be made before service and held <140 degrees

2 This part is important

Cleaning and portioning a pismo (that "fillet thing from sams ") is not as easy as it looks if you do not have experience working with large cuts of meat. Now, it is not that hard, but first timers tend to butcher the process, even after being educated on how exactly to do it. Now, i am a HUGE advocate of people learning to use these bulk cuts of beef, but i just want you to be ready for what you could be getting into. It would be a shame if you spent big money on a pismo, them messed it up and did not have enough beef for your guests. Now, you can buy a pismo that is mostly cleaned, which will be much easier, but you pay a premium, and it is still possible to mess it up. You of course could buy pre cut steaks, but that takes out all the fun, and those savages always seem to fuck up the fillets. Nothing like getting an inedible tendon of hunk of silver skin on your 10 dollar a pound steak.

My solution to this whole deal: First study the cleaning and cutting process. I am sure there is some stuff on the interbutts, maybe even some videos. There is no replacement for experience though, so buy 2 pismos. Consider the first one a practice run, and just freeze the steaks. If you mangle a few steaks, big whoop.

When i break down a pismo i usually end up with 10-14 steaks in the 3-4 oz range (really small, i am a dieter ), plus 8-9 ounces of lean scraps/chunks, and one ziplock bag of inedible stuff (tendons, fat cap, the chain ect) that i save for stock.

Edited to add. I buy my beef tenderloin at Costco and i am more than satisfied with the quality and price. And no, do not marinade this cut. Just what has been said. kosher salt + black pepper
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:33:22 PM EDT
I had to Google 'pismo' and found this:

http://www.eyefetch.com/image.aspx?ID=1059021



Looks like a challenge!
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:57:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2010 7:04:14 PM EDT by mattsd]
I found a good video, previewing it now, will post in a moment


This video shows the cleaning trimming process in pretty good detail

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOp90n9v74E&feature=related

It is a 2 part video. The second part is worth watching, but it is how to prep the tenderloin to be roasted whole, so its not really relevant to steak cutting.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:58:44 PM EDT
Ok,

Get a good cut from a reputable meat purveyors.

I like to massage the meat with peanut oil sea salt, and table cracked pepper. Let the meat rest in the fridge while you rustle up a fire.
Wait until the fire is hot. You should not be able to hold your hand over the grill for more than a second or two.
Apply the meat to the heat for 2-3 minuets.
Turn it over so the grill marks run in the same direction on both sides of the cut.
On the next turn rotate the meat 90 degrees to one side.
Leave it there for only enough time to get marked.
Do the same to the other side.
If it is not done well enough for some non meat appreciating mouth breather, it can be finished in the oven at 325.

I like peanut oil because it has a higher smoking point than olive oil. I also apply the oil to a brush and apply it to the grills.
When you manipulate your meat, use a pair of tongs. Do not poke, and stab the meat while it is cooking.
If it does not want to let go of the grill when you try and move, it is not ready to move yet. Gently attempt to turn the fillet over.

And as stated before. Let it rest on a cutting board for a few minutes with out poking, and prodding.
Finally, if you smash it down while it is cooking, you need to find the nearest sliding door, and leave your cock in the railing while a good friend runs the door through it's paces a few times.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 7:02:47 PM EDT
If the grille you will be using is somewhat underpowered, is it worthwhile to take the handy cast iron griddle and get that sucker seriously heated, and do the ffilets on it? (it has a smooth side and a ridged side)

Link Posted: 8/31/2010 7:10:29 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Merrell:
If the grille you will be using is somewhat underpowered, is it worthwhile to take the handy cast iron griddle and get that sucker seriously heated, and do the ffilets on it? (it has a smooth side and a ridged side)

http://images.bizrate.com/resize?sq=500&uid=2038975919


couldnt hurt. use the smooth side, and after your steaks are seared remove them to rest, toss on some finely sliced onions and a splash of Marsala, bam superonions.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 7:21:50 PM EDT
That is fine.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 7:26:05 PM EDT
Tag because I'm not invited and want to learn how to cook a damn good steak.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 7:28:38 PM EDT
Look up Alton Brown's skillet in the oven method.
My experience is that I get a nice medium rare (tending towards rare) at 3 minutes per side in the oven with a 1 1/2 inch thick filet.

Cover the smoke alarm first
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 7:40:25 PM EDT
Be sure to let your steaks sit out on the counter for an hour before they hit the grill, cold steaks don't cook as well. Personally I'd ditch the bacon, I don't think it does a thing, it can cause flare ups, and it won't be cooked sufficiently to be delicious.

For that matter, are you really married to tenderloin? Its easy to overcook and its usually pretty low on flavor. I'm really not sure how it became viewed as the pinnacle of steak by so many people. I'd take a strip or rib eye any day over it. Experiment cooking ahead of time because it does take practice to learn to cook a steak to your liking on your equipment.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 7:59:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Drakich:
10 minutes per side for 1 1/2" cut is a little on the burnt side.


No kidding. I'm more of a 5-6 min.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 9:21:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Soybomb:
Be sure to let your steaks sit out on the counter for an hour before they hit the grill, cold steaks don't cook as well. Personally I'd ditch the bacon, I don't think it does a thing, it can cause flare ups, and it won't be cooked sufficiently to be delicious.

For that matter, are you really married to tenderloin? Its easy to overcook and its usually pretty low on flavor. I'm really not sure how it became viewed as the pinnacle of steak by so many people. I'd take a strip or rib eye any day over it. Experiment cooking ahead of time because it does take practice to learn to cook a steak to your liking on your equipment.


Well I had been thinking Filet, but of the other options, what would be the most fool-proof? (T-bone, NY Strip, Delmonico, Ribeye)?
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 7:56:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Merrell:
Originally Posted By Soybomb:
Be sure to let your steaks sit out on the counter for an hour before they hit the grill, cold steaks don't cook as well. Personally I'd ditch the bacon, I don't think it does a thing, it can cause flare ups, and it won't be cooked sufficiently to be delicious.

For that matter, are you really married to tenderloin? Its easy to overcook and its usually pretty low on flavor. I'm really not sure how it became viewed as the pinnacle of steak by so many people. I'd take a strip or rib eye any day over it. Experiment cooking ahead of time because it does take practice to learn to cook a steak to your liking on your equipment.


Well I had been thinking Filet, but of the other options, what would be the most fool-proof? (T-bone, NY Strip, Delmonico, Ribeye)?

T-bone and porterhouse are a combination ribeye and tenderloin so you can ditch that idea. Ribeye has the most fat marbling so it should stay the most moist even if over cooked. Strip are always good too but you still need to watch for overcooking. I'd do a couple practice runs if I were you and see if you can't figure out how it works best for you.

Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:00:32 PM EDT
Did the filet for 12 - got a whole tenderloin (~6.5 pounds) cut by the butcher, did a ton of mushrooms starting from a base of butter & shallots (which went into a steak butter mix), then on to the filets themselves: oiled with olive oil, rubbed with kosher salt & black pepper, left to rest & come up to room temp for an hour or so, one wrap of thick-cut bacon on each - on to the grill for 3-4 minutes per side, then 30 minutes to rest under a tent of foil. It rocked! No pix, too many Stella Artois during prep, cooking & eating
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:08:22 PM EDT
Olive oil > vegetable oil.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:18:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 8:26:30 PM EDT by AcidGambit]
I'm an absolute whore for a nicely grilled fillet w/ a nice demi. Has to be on top a made from scratch mashed potatoes (Yukon gold) for with some baked/fried fingerling potatoes, and a side of really fresh green beans... or grilled veggies (yellow squash, carrots, etc). A good steak really need good, fresh, properly cook veggies.

Otherwise, rub with a garlic clove, kosher salt, pepper, olive oil, grill. Let sit for 10min after you remove from the heat. I like to put a touch of good quality butter on top while it sits.

I've never been a big fan of bacon wrapped around my fillet.

In a pinch, my grill is broken, I'll broil it on high... 5min on one side, 4min or the other, let sit for 10 under foil. The local indy grocer has some pre-made veal-demi that is pretty okay.
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