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Posted: 9/3/2010 9:08:29 PM EDT
Ok so I gained alot of help from the last thread I posted a few days ago, but now I have a new question.

How do you folk season your smokers? Ive heard cooking oil/bacon fat heated to 250 for an hour
Ive heard, lite a few coals and let the smoke and heat fill it

Any suggestions?
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 9:23:50 PM EDT
I have always just let it season itself as I smoked a few times.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 9:24:23 PM EDT
The instructions on the cheap smoker I was given said coat the inside of it with something like PAM spray or olive oil and give it a good burn in. Worked well with mine and it will give you an idea of temp, draw, and burn time on a load of fuel.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 9:41:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By river_rat:
I have always just let it season itself as I smoked a few times.

+1

I have never actually seasoned mine. Just do a couple small batches of food, before going big, to get a feel for any idiosyncrasies.
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 8:17:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By packingXDs:

Originally Posted By river_rat:
I have always just let it season itself as I smoked a few times.

+1

I have never actually seasoned mine. Just do a couple small batches of food, before going big, to get a feel for any idiosyncrasies.


If I go this route, would it be a good idea to spray some PAM on the grates, cause their cast iron.
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 10:59:15 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 11:18:58 AM EDT
Depending on the smoker, you need to season it to burn off any oils or reside left from the factory. I just turned mine on with some wood chips and got it to 275* for about 2 or 3 hours
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:20:22 AM EDT
I brushed some cheap veggie oil on the inside of mine, and burned for two hrs at 300 or so.

Propane smoker.

K
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 5:17:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Gloftoe:
Originally Posted By LARman0311:
Originally Posted By packingXDs:

Originally Posted By river_rat:
I have always just let it season itself as I smoked a few times.

+1

I have never actually seasoned mine. Just do a couple small batches of food, before going big, to get a feel for any idiosyncrasies.


If I go this route, would it be a good idea to spray some PAM on the grates, cause their if they're cast iron.


Not all smoker grates are cast iron. But yeah, I don't see any use in 'seasoning' a smoker. Your food doesn't come into contact with anything except the grates.


They are cast iron alright. The only wire thin metal grateing I have is the top warmer rack and my fire shelf adjuster handles.
I smoked me some pork ribs monday. They came out FAR better then I though. 4 hours at 190 -225 and I have people fighten for em. Lol
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 6:03:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Gloftoe:
But yeah, I don't see any use in 'seasoning' a smoker. Your food doesn't come into contact with anything except the grates.


Which is only part of the reason you season a smoker.

How:
When I seasoned mine about 3 months ago, I rubbed it down with lard cakes. It was a little messy, but seems to be the best way to ensure a good coating over all the metal. I rubbed the racks and ALL metal surfaces inside the cooking chamber. After applying the lard, I lit my fire. I let it burn for maybe 3 hours. Once it cooled, the insides looked like a well seasoned skillet.

Why:
Protection and sanitary purposes. My smoker was built from a 250 gal LP tank. There was some rust prior to the seasoning. After seasoning, there was no sign of rust anywhere. The metal surfaces had a dull black finish. I have cooked on it 5 or 6 times now, and the grease from the meat I cook continues to build a hard-surface cake on the previously seasoned metal.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 9:19:07 AM EDT
like others have said I loaded mine up with wood and let it burn around 300
leaves a nice dull black finish that wont come off.
after you cook on it a few times the grease will season it for you
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