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Posted: 9/7/2010 5:54:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2010 6:18:06 PM EDT by plcdwg101]
Ive been attempting to bake bread at home.. Simple 3 cups of flour, 3/4 table spoon yeast, 1 table spoon salt and 1 1\2 cup of water.. let rise for 12 hours and bake.. I attempted a couple variasioun.. No luck on eatable bread.. Any links suggestions would be helpful.. Thanks

using fleichmanns active dry yeast and letting it rise for an hour.. even tried a little more
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:58:21 PM EDT
Try this recipe. Someone else posted it here and it has become my favorite.

http://www.tammysrecipes.com/homemade_wheat_bread
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:59:29 PM EDT
what kind of yeast?

12 hours rising?
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:17:59 PM EDT
I made bread yesterday. Wonderful.

2 1/4 cups flour
1 tsp salt
1 pkg yeast
10 oz (or a bit less) warm water.

Mix ingredients, knead for 5 minutes. Cover and let rise an hour.

For 2 loaves, flatten the dough, fold the edges into the middle forming a ridge, then fold in half.

Put on parchment paper, cover, let rise another hour.

Bake at 475* for about 12 minutes. Done.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:25:22 PM EDT
Originally Posted By plcdwg101:
Ive been attempting to bake bread at home.. Simple 3 cups of flour, 3/4 table spoon yeast, 1 table spoon salt and 1 1\2 cup of water.. let rise for 12 hours and bake.. I attempted a couple variasioun.. No luck on eatable bread.. Any links suggestions would be helpful.. Thanks


sounds like a LOT of salt, maybe should be 1/2 teaspoon?
Yeast should be 1 pack of "fast-acting" dry yeast, proofed in small amount of water and a teaspoon of table sugar.

With bread, you want to develop gluten. This means you need to let rise to double size in a draft free, warm area. Then punch it down and knead, play with it like clay, for a while. Let it rise again and repeat.

I've never found a bread recipe that I liked that did not recommend 3 rises.

Bread should take all day to make.



Quick-bread is another matter. Google for measurements. I'm lazy right now. Essentially: Flour, baking powder, salt, and carbonated beverage. Bake until done.

Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:32:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Vulture774:
Originally Posted By plcdwg101:
Ive been attempting to bake bread at home.. Simple 3 cups of flour, 3/4 table spoon yeast, 1 table spoon salt and 1 1\2 cup of water.. let rise for 12 hours and bake.. I attempted a couple variasioun.. No luck on eatable bread.. Any links suggestions would be helpful.. Thanks


sounds like a LOT of salt, maybe should be 1/2 teaspoon?
Yeast should be 1 pack of "fast-acting" dry yeast, proofed in small amount of water and a teaspoon of table sugar.

With bread, you want to develop gluten. This means you need to let rise to double size in a draft free, warm area. Then punch it down and knead, play with it like clay, for a while. Let it rise again and repeat.

I've never found a bread recipe that I liked that did not recommend 3 rises.

Bread should take all day to make.



Quick-bread is another matter. Google for measurements. I'm lazy right now. Essentially: Flour, baking powder, salt, and carbonated beverage. Bake until done.



It sounds like he is attempting the slow-rise dutch-oven method of bread baking- unclear whether the OP is using a dutch oven though. You are right in that the recipe as written is probably too much salt and killing the yeast. If that were the issue he'd have a big clue with the dough failing to rise much.

As for a bread that does not require 3 rises...I have two crown-braided challahs in the oven as I type. Two rises, unless you count a ten minute rest after dividing the dough a "rise."
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 7:08:18 PM EDT
quick answer is too much salt maybe 1/2 teaspoon and not enough yeast, you need 1.75 tsp for 3 cups of flour and a bit too much water, maybe 10 oz

CHEF
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 7:18:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By plcdwg101:
Ive been attempting to bake bread at home.. Simple 3 cups of flour, 3/4 table spoon yeast, 1 table spoon salt and 1 1\2 cup of water.. let rise for 12 hours and bake.. I attempted a couple variasioun.. No luck on eatable bread.. Any links suggestions would be helpful.. Thanks

using fleichmanns active dry yeast and letting it rise for an hour.. even tried a little more


check out bannock bread, takes way less stuff & easy to make , somewhere between a pancake & corn bread, i found a website from this kannuck ultralite backpacker type who has a great recipe & a video of it being done in the field, www.maddythegoose.com , i tried it & its great no sweat to do even outdoors over a fire.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 7:18:49 PM EDT
Are you proofing your yeast? I have heard salt kills yeast so to much is a problem. I also turn the oven on for a few min. when I start and then turn off and let it rise in the warm oven.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 7:38:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bmw20:
Try this recipe. Someone else posted it here and it has become my favorite.

http://www.tammysrecipes.com/homemade_wheat_bread


I must agree it is very good. Had some that BMW made last week.

J-

Link Posted: 9/8/2010 2:09:26 AM EDT
Look up "Easy Bread" on YouTube. This extremely goofy guy put out a good video on an extremely easy recipe. His method seems a bit different than yours. After 12 hrs in the mixing bowl he puts it on the counter and stretches and folds it a few times. It then sits in the bread pan for 2 more hours. The oven times are different too. 500 degrees for 10 minutes. 450 for ten minutes and then 350 for 10 minutes after removing from the bread pan. I've been making a couple of loafs per week for a few months after finding this recipe. It works really well. The longer it sits in the mixing bowl and bread pan before cooking the better it does.
One thing that I've noticed. I usually use the yeast in the little packets. After they've been open for a weak or so it doesn't seem to do as well. The dough doesn't rise as much with an opened packet as it does with a fresh pack.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 2:23:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 12:36:42 PM EDT by MournSword]
BIG thing a lot of people do wrong with yeast, is having the temperature too hot or too cold. Yeast just doesn't do well... MournSword
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 5:20:24 AM EDT
I have been using 1 cup of 'runny' starter,1 packet of yeast in a 1/4 cup of warm water+1tsp sugar to proof. I then add about 3-31/2 cups of bread flour and about another cup of water. I put this i my bread machine just to let it mix. Pour this in a greased bowl and place in warm oven for an hour. I then pour this into the bread pan, back in the oven for another hour of rising. Remove from oven, set oven to 425F and then back for like 25 minutes. turn out onto cooling rack. Pretty good results so far, just wish it would rise a little more
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