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Posted: 5/13/2017 3:08:23 PM EDT
I just ordered a CZ 455 varmint that I am making into a .22 clone ish of my .308.  For shooting .308 100-500 yards I was taught to zero at 100 and dial for everything else as that way you are always dialing added elevation.  

I am more likely to get to the 100 yard range that the 600 range I visit more often so my purpose is to get more trigger time practicing dialing in elevation and reading wind with a rimfire.  


To best mimic my 100 yard zero in a rimfire would 25 yards be best or should I
be looking at 50? 75?  Any opinions and hopefully reasoning behind them would be helpful.

Thanks.
Link Posted: 5/13/2017 4:03:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: Trollslayer] [#1]
Originally Posted By dj1975232:
For shooting .308 100-500 yards I was taught to zero at 100 and dial for everything else as that way you are always dialing added elevation.  

I think you are laboring under a bit of a misconception here.


I am more likely to get to the 100 yard range that the 600 range I visit more often so my purpose is to get more trigger time practicing dialing in elevation and reading wind with a rimfire.  

This makes perfect sense, and it's cheaper, too.


To best mimic my 100 yard zero in a rimfire would 25 yards be best or should I
be looking at 50? 75?  

That same misconception, again.  Let me explain further (as I see it).

Any opinions and hopefully reasoning behind them would be helpful.

Thanks.


Your zero is good to know but will differ for the 308 and rimfire.  Learn each but do not expect them to be the same/similar.  Bullet drop is almost never an issue.  Learn the "come ups" for each as well - how much to raise the rear sight as the distance increases.  These will also differ.  The drop/come up is something you just crank in.

It is possible to determine equivalent distances for your rimfire and centerfire cartridges in terms of wind drift.  Those are the distances at which a X mph wind will move your rimfire the same amount as your centerfire.

At those equivalent distances the windage corrections needed for your rimfire will equal your centerfire.  You can learn what correction to make when the wind changes and use that same correction on your centerfire at its equivalent (longer) distance.  Learn THAT and you have advanced a long way.

Does that make sense?  Is that what you were after?
Link Posted: 5/13/2017 4:51:37 PM EDT
[#2]
I think I explained my intentions poorly.  

I am not trying to have the same zero for my .308 and .22.  I am looking to find a zero for my .22 to use as a shrunk down version to use from 25-200 yards per that will improve my skills for shooting my centerfire rifle from 100-500 yards.  

Maybe that still is worded poorly but hopefully that explains it better.
Link Posted: 5/13/2017 5:08:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: RaptorFuel] [#3]
Thats what I use my .22 for.  I zero at 50 and that works for me.

ETA, I usually shoot from 50-300 yards.
Link Posted: 5/13/2017 5:43:44 PM EDT
[#4]
1000 inches
Link Posted: 5/13/2017 5:45:33 PM EDT
[#5]
Link Posted: 5/13/2017 6:55:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: Hoser] [#6]
Zero your 22 at 50 or so yards.  

Depending on your scope and scope base, you should still be able to dial elevation out to 250 or so.

I run a Long Range Precision Rimfire match in Colorado where the targets are from 40-220 yards.  Most everyone runs a 50 yard zero.

https://www.ar-15.co/threads/151753-Pueblo-Rimfire-Precision-Matches
Link Posted: 5/13/2017 7:06:52 PM EDT
[#7]
So it seems like 50 yards is my best bet.  I am using a 25 MOA base and initially a 10x42 SWFA SS so it sound like I will not be limited by elevation until I get out past 250?  Sounds good to me.  I'd like to think that I can do that but I'm not sure the skills are there yet to take .22 that far out.
Link Posted: 5/13/2017 11:18:26 PM EDT
[#8]
So, please explain why you are concerned about elevation zero and what your rimfire elevation zero means relative to your centerfire.
Link Posted: 5/14/2017 12:59:06 AM EDT
[#9]
If you have to dial down, go past it and then come up to your required elevation, problem solved.  First reply to your post gave you the perfect answer. Reread the windage part of that post.
Link Posted: 5/14/2017 6:37:21 AM EDT
[#10]
I understand the windage part and that makes sense.  I think including my info about my other rifle just clouded the question.  

Simply put, I just wanted a scaled down version of my other rifle to practice with at the scaled down ranges to work on my fundamentals in a caliber that is more cost effective and easier to find room to shoot.
Link Posted: 5/14/2017 12:46:41 PM EDT
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dj1975232:
I understand the windage part and that makes sense.  I think including my info about my other rifle just clouded the question.  

Simply put, I just wanted a scaled down version of my other rifle to practice with at the scaled down ranges to work on my fundamentals in a caliber that is more cost effective and easier to find room to shoot.
View Quote
Ah, okay, now I understand.  It's why I have one, too.
Link Posted: 6/11/2017 8:52:39 AM EDT
[#12]
To help you judge if your 25moa base combined with the moa available to you in your scope
elevation, here is some ballistic data for the average standard velocity .22lr cartridge:

40 grain lead round nose @ 1050 fps from a bolt action, 24" barrel

0yds     -1.5" drop     0 MOA
25yds     0.3" drop     1.2 MOA drop
50yds     0.0" drop     0.0 MOA drop
75yds    -2.6" drop    -3.3 MOA drop
100yds  -7.6" drop    -7.3 MOA drop
125yds  -15.2" drop  -11.6 MOA drop
150yds  -25.6" drop  -16.3 MOA drop
175yds  -38.8" drop  -21.2 MOA drop
200yds  -55.0" drop  -26.3 MOA drop
225yds  -74.5" drop  -31.6 MOA drop
250yds  -97.2" drop  -37.1 MOA drop

So as you can see, even with a 25MOA base if your scope at your 50 yard zero
can't provide 37.1 MOA of come up then you'll need to limit your range.

The SWFA 10x42 SS has a total of 100 MOA elevation, depending on how much is
used getting to your zero should give you the 37.1 MOA you need.  You won't know
until you fire that scenario. If you run out of click value, you can make it up with hold
over using your reticle which has 40 MOA of elevation.

Hope this is useful,
Ted
Link Posted: 6/11/2017 8:45:47 PM EDT
[#13]
That is useful.  I was able to walk it out to around 225 yards on my first outing and still have a lot of elevation adjustment left in the turret.  I have the Mil/Mil version and with a 50 yard zero and the 25 moa rail, I have about 18 Mil/61MOA left in the turret.  At 225 I dialed right around 9 Mils and was getting more hits than not.  At that point my greatest enemy is the wind and not reading it.  

I've really never taken .22lr out past 100 yards prior to this and it is great!  These rifles are stupid accurate and with good ammo really put the shots where you want them.
Link Posted: 6/17/2017 11:37:22 AM EDT
[#14]
Using a 25moa base on my 10/22 with a Kidd 18" barrel and CCI SV with a 50yd zero I have about 15mils of drop at 300yds. I don't think you'll find it mimics 308 at all. Shooting 22lr at distance will however help you learn to call the wind
Link Posted: 6/17/2017 3:36:23 PM EDT
[#15]
With my scope/mount setup I can shoot over 500 yds.  I haven't shot it past 300 yet.
Link Posted: 8/7/2017 4:58:07 PM EDT
[#16]
I use a 50yd zero on my 40x repeater, all come-ups are up. 

I was shooting it at 300yd this weekend, 48moa come-up, 3mph wind hold was 3". It was windy (3-10mph, at 2-4o'clock), much fun was had shooting at 2/3rd IPSC silhouette gongs. Everyone had a lot more fun with the 40x at 300 than the 308 at 500.

Best part about the 40x is you can watch the bullet glint in the sun through the scope. If you have a solid position at 100yd you can watch the bullet arc into the bullseye.  
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 6:46:53 PM EDT
[#17]
I have used this table .Confirmed to 200 yards.

Link Posted: 8/23/2017 9:13:47 PM EDT
[#18]
I zero my Mark ll TR at 50 and shoot out to 300.  Lots of fun.
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