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Posted: 6/5/2008 5:09:37 PM EDT
Im an aircrewman in the USN and fly on a C-130.  We regularly fly in the mideast and just about anywhere in the world.  The plane is stocked with basic provisions for first aid and water as well as handheld radios and even life rafts in the wings for a ditching.  But there is always the chance that we might have to bail out.  This would be a worst case scenario.  The crew would be spread out with potentially miles between each other.  In a bail out it isnt feasable to gather and bail out with big 2 gallon water jugs, radios, etc.  Likely whatever is precipitating the bailout is so dire and sudden that it precludes an emergency landing so likely the plane is on fire, or catastrophic mechanical failure and the crew needs to get out RFN.  We dont wear survival vests(SV-2's) so most of us have our own personal kits that we keep with us.  

Mine is pretty simple.  A 1qt wide mouth Nalgene bottle.  Inside I have a couple chemlights, a small knife, diamond sharpening stick, fishing kit with 10lb spiderwire wound on two sewing bobbins, assorted hooks and splitshot, water treatment tablets, matches, firesteel and magnesium bar, OTC pain meds, a small waterproof flashlight, P38 can opener, a black garbage bag folded up, a few zip ties, small signal mirror, a pencil, a carabiner and secured to the bottle by the lid retaining loop and another carabiner is 50' of 550 cord and a Cold Steel SRK(the Carbon V ones).

Its light, about 3 lbs and compact.  It would be easy and fast to clip to my parachute harness and serves for what ever I might need on the ground.  Even here in the US there are vast stretches of remote land and I think this would help in case something went south.   Im always looking for ways to make this kit better..  Any thoughts r do I have it covered?
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 5:37:34 PM EDT
im not as equipped as you but in my truck I keep a spare G23 mag, a 3D-cell MagLight 9 batteries, multi-tool, and hunting knife, along with a Outdoor(tm) backpack containing one complete change of clothes, toothbrush/paste, 2AA maglight, more advanced multi-tool, speaker wire, Hot Hands warmers,2 glow sticks, baby bic lighter.

I know it's lacking but it has come in handy on more than one event
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 6:59:27 PM EDT
The nalgene bottle kit is a good idea , maybe a space blanket would fit in it.  How about a small pencil and some paper to write with also. And a stuff sack the same size as the bottle, to put your kit in and sling it with some 550 cord and use the bottle for water. Compass if you dont have one already (small will do).

Thanks for your service too...
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 7:35:48 PM EDT
Issue strobe and a wide brimmed hat
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 9:26:33 PM EDT
I'm trying to figure how to add my issue strobe too.  I also forgot I have a small compass in the bottle too.
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 2:48:57 AM EDT
I found the lists on doug Ritters site, Equipped to Survive, very comprehensive and well thought out.

www.equipped.org/avsrvtoc.htm

Full-Auto
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 3:10:59 AM EDT
I pave driveways and sealcoat them, so I am always in a different vehicle and filthy, but I go nowhere without my cheap little Kel-tec P3At
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 11:39:24 AM EDT
Your idea is not bad, but why not expand it some more.....I jumped outa airplanes for almost half of my 9+ years on active duty in the Army, and you wouldn't believe the amount of crap we strapped to ourselves, and to our parachute harnesses....of course, those parachute harnesses were designed/configured with appropriately placed, heavy-duty D-rings for attaching things (like your reserve parachute, 70+lb rucksack, weapons container, etc, etc).

The point I'm making is not to throw that much crap onto your parachute harness, but to expand your current configuration.  What about something smaller, with sturdy grab-straps or D-rings, that you could still grab-n-clip to your harness.....something like maybe the size of the old style butt-packs.  Something that small could be ridden-in because of its light weight, unlike the stuff I jumped in the Army, which we lowered below us on a lowering line before hitting the ground.  Also take a look at the Eagle Industries E&E bag.  I just bought one, and am really liking it.  It has carry handles, stowable backpack straps, and a side-release buckle hang-strap.  The interior has, depending on the size you get, either four or five interior mesh zipper-closed pouches, as well as a pouch sized to hold a 50 or 70 oz water bladder.  I'm sure your ALSE folks could help you configure something that won't fall off of you with any free-fall/opening shock, would survive the impact of you and the equipment hitting the ground, as well as provide items to stock whatever it is you get.

The other point I'm suggesting is its far better to have a few important things like small amounts of food and water ALREADY on/with you, instead of being behind the power curve and having to forage for food and water.  What if you are unable to move around once on the ground due to injury and/or hostile forces in the area near where you land????  At least then you can hide and survive a little while before having to obtain/create food and water.
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 7:51:06 PM EDT

Quoted:
Your idea is not bad, but why not expand it some more.....I jumped outa airplanes for almost half of my 9+ years on active duty in the Army, and you wouldn't believe the amount of crap we strapped to ourselves, and to our parachute harnesses....of course, those parachute harnesses were designed/configured with appropriately placed, heavy-duty D-rings for attaching things (like your reserve parachute, 70+lb rucksack, weapons container, etc, etc).

The point I'm making is not to throw that much crap onto your parachute harness, but to expand your current configuration.  What about something smaller, with sturdy grab-straps or D-rings, that you could still grab-n-clip to your harness.....something like maybe the size of the old style butt-packs.  Something that small could be ridden-in because of its light weight, unlike the stuff I jumped in the Army, which we lowered below us on a lowering line before hitting the ground.  Also take a look at the Eagle Industries E&E bag.  I just bought one, and am really liking it.  It has carry handles, stowable backpack straps, and a side-release buckle hang-strap.  The interior has, depending on the size you get, either four or five interior mesh zipper-closed pouches, as well as a pouch sized to hold a 50 or 70 oz water bladder.  I'm sure your ALSE folks could help you configure something that won't fall off of you with any free-fall/opening shock, would survive the impact of you and the equipment hitting the ground, as well as provide items to stock whatever it is you get.

The other point I'm suggesting is its far better to have a few important things like small amounts of food and water ALREADY on/with you, instead of being behind the power curve and having to forage for food and water.  What if you are unable to move around once on the ground due to injury and/or hostile forces in the area near where you land????  At least then you can hide and survive a little while before having to obtain/create food and water.


Interesting.,.  I like your idea.  I have thought of a small pack.  Thanx!
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