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12/11/2018 1:58:31 AM
Posted: 9/9/2018 11:22:05 PM EST
I have gone car-camping several times a year since I was little. I am pretty familiar with the basics of camping, but always at camp sites at state parks and such. This fall I want to do a solo backpacking/hunting trip and I would like the hive-mind's suggestions on what I may be missing or things I have that may just be extra weight.

What I have:
Teton Sports 65L pack
ENO double hammock
10x10 tyvek tarp
35 degree sleeping bag (the average low temps where I will be are upper 30s)
SOL escape bivvy to slip over the sleeping bag
Pillow will be some piece of clothing
Stanley cook kit, burner stove, fuel canister, utensils, etc.
Two 20L dry bags for storing food and/or clothes
Hatchet and Mora knife
Lighters and fire steel
First aid kit
I have everything I need for the hunting side of things, no worries there.

What I have to get:
Water bladder (thinking 3L, maybe 2 as there are ponds and creeks all over the place)
Sawyer water filter (haven't decided on the squeeze or the mini), and bags to go with it
A roll (hank?) of Zing-It line for the tarp, hanging food bag, etc.
Stakes for the tarp
A buddy is going to let me use his GPS locator/messaging device. All I have to do is pay for a month's subscription to turn it on.

I think this covers everything except the food and toiletries part, but I am pretty sure I am missing something. I usually load up the back of the truck with everything and then some. Anything I have ever forgotten can be picked up at a nearby store. I am a little nervous as running to a store because I hiked 3 miles into the woods would pretty much be an end to this hunting trip.
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 12:49:10 AM EST
I would have a colder bag and some type of insulation for under you unless you have hammock camped and know this setup would work for you. I dont think i would rely on the added warmth of the SOL bivy.

Water bladder I am partial to the platypus big zip and I run a sawyer in line. I would go woth the squeeze over the mini for more flow. And I would leave the bags at home unless i was going to filter the clean water into them. I would sleep with the filter so it doesnt freeze at night with those temps reaching into the 30's. Bring drops or pills or a steripen as back up.

I have looked at the teton packs and am not a fan but thats just my opinion, I wouldn't want to put weight in them.

I would consider this trip a shake down trip see what works and be willing to change for future trips.
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 6:25:05 AM EST
Small garden shovel for digging a cat trench ( for pooping).



Also, if you don't have it already, the book How To Shit In The Woods is very good. Emulating the proverbial bear is actually a little more involved than one might think.

I like to take "poop bags" with me. Each has a wad of paper, plus two individual Tux packets to clean up (one for your butt, one for your fingers), enclosed in a ziplock bag. There are very few things as nasty as a sore butthole because you didn't clean up properly!

One of the things mentioned in the book is the fact that toilet paper does NOT deteriorate when buried, even when you use "environmentally friendly" TP. Paper will become uncovered, no matter how deep you bury it, and then soil the mountainside.

So while you bury your turds, you pack out your paper. And the ziplock bags keep this chore as non-odiferous as it can be.
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 8:28:43 AM EST
Map and compass .
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 8:43:22 AM EST
Skimming your list I'd lose the hatchet. No need for it and lighter is better; if you really feel you need something for cutting a folding saw is lighter and more efficient. As the saying goes, ounces equal pounds and pounds equal pain. If you aren't used to carrying a pack I'd start conditioning yourself as soon as you can.
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 12:22:59 PM EST
Where is the hunt taking place?

As the poster above said, ditch the hatchet. I would leave the Mora and fire steel too. I'm assuming you have a regular hunting knife that you will be using.

I've done several backcountry solo hunting and fishing trips over the years. I use a tent and ground pad but a lot of my trips are above treeline.
Have you put any consideration into packing the meat out? One trip or two, etc.? Doing it by yourself sucks. I passed up a trophy bear several years ago for the simple fact that I was so far from the trailhead, so I just took a pic of him. I'm pretty sure he would of made B&C. Getting old sucks....
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 12:40:50 PM EST
I second with having insulation, underquilt, under the hammock. Without it, you will be very cold, BTDT. Your body weight compresses the sleeping bag insulation, reducing its ability to keep your warm. Cold air is circulating below the hammock. In 30 degree weather, you will not be happy.
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 1:24:03 PM EST
Originally Posted By Seansworth:
I have gone car-camping several times a year since I was little. I am pretty familiar with the basics of camping, but always at camp sites at state parks and such. This fall I want to do a solo backpacking/hunting trip and I would like the hive-mind's suggestions on what I may be missing or things I have that may just be extra weight.

What I have:
Teton Sports 65L pack
ENO double hammock
10x10 tyvek tarp
35 degree sleeping bag (the average low temps where I will be are upper 30s)
SOL escape bivvy to slip over the sleeping bag
Pillow will be some piece of clothing
Stanley cook kit, burner stove, fuel canister, utensils, etc.
Two 20L dry bags for storing food and/or clothes
Hatchet and Mora knife
Lighters and fire steel
First aid kit
I have everything I need for the hunting side of things, no worries there.

What I have to get:
Water bladder (thinking 3L, maybe 2 as there are ponds and creeks all over the place)
Sawyer water filter (haven't decided on the squeeze or the mini), and bags to go with it
A roll (hank?) of Zing-It line for the tarp, hanging food bag, etc.
Stakes for the tarp
A buddy is going to let me use his GPS locator/messaging device. All I have to do is pay for a month's subscription to turn it on.

I think this covers everything except the food and toiletries part, but I am pretty sure I am missing something. I usually load up the back of the truck with everything and then some. Anything I have ever forgotten can be picked up at a nearby store. I am a little nervous as running to a store because I hiked 3 miles into the woods would pretty much be an end to this hunting trip.
View Quote
Things to ditch: hatchet, fire steel. SOL Bivvy won't be sufficient for what you intend.
Things to add: underquilt or insulation for your backside. Fire starters (cotton balls soaked in Vaseline is great)

For the sawyer- having a dirty water squeeze bag is needed. I don't like hooking it up in line with a bladder because it really reduces water flow.
Other things will need to be added if you're in bear country.

Make sure you are comfortable with your layering system. In 30 deg weather, definitely recommend base layers + fleece midlayer for walking, and some sort of down jacket for your outer layer. Hard shell if you expect to get snowed on. Multiple pairs of socks highly recommended.
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 7:42:35 PM EST
Unless you’ve used and been comfortable in that sleeping bag in those temps, don’t count on it being a true 35 degree bag. They tend to be optimistic by 10-15 degrees in most cases.

If there are streams everywhere, bring 1 smaller bladder or bottle and fill it when you come to one.

You’ll want a headlamp, flashlights suck for camp chores because most of them require both hands.

Bring at least 1 base layer for sleeping, if you only bring 1 keep it dry and use it only for sleeping.

You’ll definitely want some kind of insulation for under your sleeping bag, as mentioned. If you use a sleeping pad an insulated one will be better in the temps that are forecast.
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 8:00:38 PM EST
Thanks for the tips. I completely forgot about the poop trowel. I'll see what the final weight comes out to and if I cross 50lbs with water, food, and hunting gear (probably will) I'll ditch the hatchet. I want some kind of fixed blade with me as that will be what I also use to field dress along with a scalpel. My hunting knife was a gift years ago and it is good at its job, but not much else. This will be a test to see if the Mora can replace it as a hunting knife and be good for other tasks.

As far as warmth, I am familiar with cold weather. I didn't mention that I have a pad to keep between me and the bottom of the hammock as well. Underquilts are friggin expensive. One decent underquilt would nearly double the cost of my whole setup. I have been trying to find a military surplus store that has poncho liners so I can try my hand at one of the DIY underquilts, no luck yet. Between the pad, double bagging the bag & bivvy, and layering up inside the bag I am pretty sure I will be fine. I am 100% confident I won't die, and 70% confident I will be warm enough to get a good night's sleep. I've spent plenty of nights in the cold with less stuff around me. If I am wrong I will be sure to report back so you all can laugh at me.
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 8:36:16 PM EST
You gonna hang a bear bag? If so you need a rope. Maybe I missed it but I'd take a nalgene or something in addition to a bladder. First aid kit?
Link Posted: 9/10/2018 8:49:02 PM EST
Sawyer squeeze rocks, used it on the AT. Get or make an under quilt for your hammock....anything below 65 degrees at night and you will get cold butt syndrome lol. If I missed that in your comment, my apologies.
Top quilts are awesome and a great project to build your own using synthetic insulation.
Link Posted: 9/11/2018 5:02:47 AM EST
50lb is a lot of weight, you should really try to trim it down some. Just bring a single pot and fork instead of the whole cook set, food in cans is heavy and you have a lot of weight in trash to pack out, freeze dried is best from a weight standpoint, leave the stakes and tie off the tarp to trees, etc. Ditch every non-essential single purpose item. For example, if rain isn’t in the forecast you could leave the bivy and wrap up in the tarp instead. How many days and miles do you plan on going? Are you going to hike out and set up a base camp where you’ll hunt from the whole time, or moving every day? Weight is less of an issue for the former, assuming you’re not talking a 20 mile hike in.

Given the weight you’re talking about you’re not carrying lightweight gear, but if there’s a strong possibility of these trips becoming regular I’d recommend starting to acquire some. For the temps you’re talking about you can find a hammock or 1p tent, bag (down), and pad that weigh no more than 7-8lb total and not spend a boatload of money. Once you go lightweight you’ll never go back.
Link Posted: 9/11/2018 5:49:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/11/2018 5:52:49 AM EST by tc556guy]
How long are you going to be afield on these trips? Just out and back for a single night or multi-day. You going solo or as part of a larger party. How far in are you walking
edit: I see solo trip. Missed that
What are you using for white or red light for working around the campsite or doing a middle of the night emergency walk-out if it comes to that.
Link Posted: 9/11/2018 6:07:04 AM EST
Do you have quality hiking boots? How about something to act as a camp shoe and for crossing water? Hiking poles are excellent for saving your knees.
Link Posted: 9/11/2018 7:47:06 AM EST
baggie of cotton balls soaked in vaseline

can start fires and use to treat your feet each day to prevent swamp foot and blisters
Link Posted: 9/11/2018 7:48:47 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Crazycamper123:
Sawyer squeeze rocks, used it on the AT. Get or make an under quilt for your hammock....anything below 65 degrees at night and you will get cold butt syndrome lol. If I missed that in your comment, my apologies.
Top quilts are awesome and a great project to build your own using synthetic insulation.
View Quote
Under quilt vs space blanket?

I have used space blankets under sleeping bags in sub zero weather to good effect
not sure about hammocks but I would think the effect would be the same and lighter than an underquilt as well as being immune to compression effects
Link Posted: 9/12/2018 10:34:56 AM EST
Lose the hammock. A lightweight 2 man tent(3.4 lbs) Sierra designs, MSR, etc. lightweight + medium weight military bag + a thermarrest or comparable pad. Benie cap. A small tarp. 550 cord. Any simple isobutane stove i.e. Jetboil, MSR, etc. collapsible light weight saw( Sven). 3 lighters. I cap and back back sole in Michigans U P monthly. Going back up this Monday
Link Posted: 9/12/2018 6:15:12 PM EST
Lots of great ideas and advice so far.

My $.02:

Bring a small ziploc bag to put your Sawyer in at night. They are susceptible to freezing which will destroy them. That way you can keep it next to you at night without getting wet to prevent freezing.

Clothes for a pillow is okay at best. Add the 5oz (I know, ounces equal pounds and pounds equal pain) for a lightweight inflatable pillow. It will make a difference for sure.

Let us know what your final loadout looks like!
Link Posted: 9/12/2018 8:43:29 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/12/2018 8:50:39 PM EST by AFCarbon15]
Try it, set it up, use it, many times before you commit. Go on day hikes. Take all your gear as you would for over-nighters. Hike in at least 2 miles, set up everything, even cook a small meal. Filter some water, set up your sleep system, take a nap. Tear it all down and hike back out. Can all be done in 3-4 hours. But using your gear will let you know if it works for you. You'll get better, more efficient and you'll be able to test your load out, gear, clothing ect. It's much less painful than testing your gear on over-nighters, but a little less comprehensive. Keep a list of items you didn't use. Another list of items you "wished" you had. Then evaluate if those items need to be removed or added. I've even set up in my yard and napped just to make sure it worked.

Items I have decided are not must haves, but I carry anyway (read comfort items)
Inflatable pillow, it ensures s little better sleep/rest
NAA mini for reasons
24hr high/low thermometer, I'll have a number to associate the limitations of my comfort to better plan for the next time.
Desserts and extra snacks. I'd rather carry food I don't eat than limit myself just for the few extra ounces.
Extra headlamp batteries and Streamlight microstream. Never know when you might accidentally leave a light on and run your batteries dead.
HPG kit bag. I don't take it off until I go to sleep, even then, it's within reach. Keeps the absolute necessities on me comfortably at ALL times.
Paracord. I have my set up down, but for a few extra ounces, I like having options.
Leatherman Wave. I EDC one, I just like to have it.

Again, test as best you can before it matters.
Link Posted: 9/13/2018 12:07:53 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KD5TXX:
You gonna hang a bear bag? If so you need a rope. Maybe I missed it but I'd take a nalgene or something in addition to a bladder. First aid kit?
View Quote
One of the two 20L dry bags will be used just for food and I intend to hang it in a tree away from camp. I will find a water bottle of some sort to carry and I have a decent first aid kit.
Link Posted: 9/13/2018 12:11:48 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ME2112:
50lb is a lot of weight, you should really try to trim it down some. Just bring a single pot and fork instead of the whole cook set, food in cans is heavy and you have a lot of weight in trash to pack out, freeze dried is best from a weight standpoint, leave the stakes and tie off the tarp to trees, etc. Ditch every non-essential single purpose item. For example, if rain isn’t in the forecast you could leave the bivy and wrap up in the tarp instead. How many days and miles do you plan on going? Are you going to hike out and set up a base camp where you’ll hunt from the whole time, or moving every day? Weight is less of an issue for the former, assuming you’re not talking a 20 mile hike in.

Given the weight you’re talking about you’re not carrying lightweight gear, but if there’s a strong possibility of these trips becoming regular I’d recommend starting to acquire some. For the temps you’re talking about you can find a hammock or 1p tent, bag (down), and pad that weigh no more than 7-8lb total and not spend a boatload of money. Once you go lightweight you’ll never go back.
View Quote
2-3 days. Only planning on hiking two or three miles in and setting up a base camp, that's why I'm not terribly concerned about the weight. This will be on public land, I only intend to hike far enough out to get away from the lazy masses. With me being new to this type of camping I want to have the option of calling it quits and heading back to my truck if I get in over my head.
Link Posted: 9/13/2018 12:12:24 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
How long are you going to be afield on these trips? Just out and back for a single night or multi-day. You going solo or as part of a larger party. How far in are you walking
edit: I see solo trip. Missed that
What are you using for white or red light for working around the campsite or doing a middle of the night emergency walk-out if it comes to that.
View Quote
I have both a flashlight and a head lamp that have both red and white.
Link Posted: 9/13/2018 12:13:29 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KingRat:
Do you have quality hiking boots? How about something to act as a camp shoe and for crossing water? Hiking poles are excellent for saving your knees.
View Quote
I have decent hunting boots and some old sneakers that are well broken in but still comfortable for camp shoes.
Link Posted: 9/13/2018 12:18:53 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AFCarbon15:

Again, test as best you can before it matters.
View Quote
I have set up the hammock many times for afternoon naps. I've got a good eye for trees that are a good distance apart to get a good lay. The sleeping bag/bivvy is new to me. Here in a couple of weekends I have some time off from work that I am going to try and make it out to do the full setup of the sleeping system. I've already boiled water several times with the stove and pot.

I'm working on it, just trying to find time away from work so I can get out to somewhere I can do the full setup all night and see how it works.
Link Posted: 9/13/2018 6:37:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/13/2018 6:39:47 AM EST by Iram]
I know when you look at individual pieces (just the tarp, just the straps, just the hammock, etc.), I know hammocks look light and cheap, but when you look at your entire sleep system hammocks start getting as expensive within a few ounces (usually heavier) than tents.

You'll be very cold with what you listed. Maybe not freeze-to-death cold, but probably too cold to sleep. Keep in mind most cases of hypothermia are around 50 degrees.

Unless you're dead set on hammock camping, I'd just ditch it and buy a decent tent and sleeping pad. I think my Kelty TN2 tent was $200, and my insulated Klymit sleeping pad was $75.

------------------

You mentioned some budget gear, so I assume you're looking to keep prices low. Check out Walmart for stuff sacks and dry bags; they have decent (not great, but decent) stuff for a quarter the price you'll see elsewhere.

One of my local walmarts also frequently sells Sawyer filters (both mini and squeeze) cheaper than I can find them anywhere else. I own both; I carry the squeeze if I actually expect to use a filter (the mini has been relegated to the "just in case" stuff in my day pack).

Also, google "the deuce of spades". It's the lightest trowel I've seen, and they work.
Link Posted: 10/17/2018 7:29:39 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NightHawkIX:

Things to ditch: hatchet, fire steel. SOL Bivvy won't be sufficient for what you intend.
Things to add: underquilt or insulation for your backside. Fire starters (cotton balls soaked in Vaseline is great)
View Quote
Why do you say to ditch the fire steel? I've only backpacked a couple times, but on my first backpacking trip, my lighter didn't work (elevation?) and the strike-strip on my waterproof match container didn't work (my fault for not testing at home). The fire steel saved me. Seems like cheap (and light) insurance.
Link Posted: 10/17/2018 4:58:29 PM EST
I would also look at Hammock Gear they make their Econ line of quilts both top and bottom. They have 2 different models of that line for under quilts that are pretty reasonable. I looked at making my own until I found them. I have only been able to use them a couple of times so far but they are good to go. Hope this helps.
Link Posted: 10/18/2018 10:22:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/18/2018 10:28:17 PM EST by Lungbuster]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SnoopisTDI:

Why do you say to ditch the fire steel? I've only backpacked a couple times, but on my first backpacking trip, my lighter didn't work (elevation?) and the strike-strip on my waterproof match container didn't work (my fault for not testing at home). The fire steel saved me. Seems like cheap (and light) insurance.
View Quote
Where the hell were you, Mt. Everest?
I hunt/backpack every year above tree line at 10,000 to 14,000 feet and my lighters work fine.
Fire steels are stupid.

ETA:
Using a ferro rod to light a butane stove looks cool and I support that. If you can’t look cool, why bother?
Link Posted: 10/19/2018 6:31:19 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Lungbuster:

Where the hell were you, Mt. Everest?
I hunt/backpack every year above tree line at 10,000 to 14,000 feet and my lighters work fine.
Fire steels are stupid.

ETA:
Using a ferro rod to light a butane stove looks cool and I support that. If you can’t look cool, why bother?
View Quote
My current canister stove ( Soto Amicus )has a built in piezo ignition that's been so reliable that I don't
even keep a lighter in my cook kit anymore. A spare Bic mini lives in my First Aid / repair / ditty bag.

For my alcohol stoves I actually prefer a firesteel. I have a little steel and scraper that weighs less than a
lighter and is easier to use with less chance of singing my knuckle hair.
I suppose the looking cool thing is a bonus.
Link Posted: 10/23/2018 1:09:03 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sandboxmedic:
Skimming your list I'd lose the hatchet. No need for it and lighter is better; if you really feel you need something for cutting a folding saw is lighter and more efficient. As the saying goes, ounces equal pounds and pounds equal pain. If you aren't used to carrying a pack I'd start conditioning yourself as soon as you can.
View Quote
You and I think alike.

Ditch the hatchet. Sub par for use and lots of weight.
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